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Mitali Sharma, center, marches with Clayton High School classmates in downtown St. Louis.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

March for Our Lives: St. Louis rallies against gun violence

Thousands of people marched in downtown St. Louis on Saturday morning to protest gun violence and advocate for stricter gun control. Saturday’s March for Our Lives event was a culmination of a month-long effort to honor the 17 people killed during the Feb. 14 school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. Survivors of the shooting helped organize the rally in Washington, D.C., with sister marches occurring across the U.S. — including the one in St. Louis — and around the world. As a light rain fell, demonstrators chanted and carried signs reading “enough is enough” and “make our schools safe again.”

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College students in the Living Lands & Waters Alternative Spring Break program hauled roughly 35,000 pounds of garbage from the Mississippi River this year near Grafton, IL.
Shahla Farzan | St. Louis Public Radio


A rowdy group of college students slathers on sunscreen, getting ready for a day on the river.

Instead of bathing suits, these spring breakers are decked out in knee-high rubber boots and faded life jackets. They’re part of the Living Lands & Waters river cleanup crew and for a week, they’ll spend their days pulling trash from the Mississippi River near Grafton, Illinois.


Washington University faculty member Wilmetta Toliver-Diallo previewed the institution’s 13th annual African Film Festival, which is set for March 23 to 25.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

This weekend’s African Film Festival at Washington University comes on the heels of the wildly successful blockbuster “Black Panther” and is billed as a showcase of “the real Wakanda.”

Seven films comprise the 2018 iteration of the annual festival, which features filmmakers and stories depicting the rich diversity of the African continent.

File Photo |Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

The Missouri Ethics Commission currently has three members, which is not enough to decide complaints filed against elected officeholders or candidates for public office.

The commission lost half its members last week when their terms expired, and Gov. Eric Greitens has yet to fill them. James Klahr, the commission’s executive director, said it can still carry out some duties.

Nicole Galloway poses for a portrait at St. Louis Public Radio. March, 22, 2018
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

“I am tough and I am thorough,” explained Nicole Galloway, Missouri’s state auditor.

Galloway, who joined St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh on Thursday, detailed what her job entails, explained her ongoing audit of the City of St. Louis and addressed the mood in Jefferson City as Gov. Eric Greitens’ felony invasion of privacy trial is set to get underway May 14.

Galloway’s audit of the City of St. Louis began a few months ago and will likely take several years. Part of the audit, Galloway explained, will be a review of development incentives.

On Chess: the old guard and the new

Mar 22, 2018
The winners of the 2018 Spring Classic tournament. Group A (left) winner, Jeffrey Xiong, and group B winner, Victor Mikhalevski.
Austin Fuller | Saint Louis Chess Club

The 2018 Spring Chess Classic has come to an end, and we had two thrilling tournaments – both newsworthy in their own way. When analyzed, both tournaments could not be more different.

State Treasurer Eric Schmitt announces changes in Missouri's Linked Deposit Program on March 22, 2018, in St. Louis.
Jason Rosenbaum I St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri Treasurer Eric Schmitt is expanding a program that delivers low-interest loans to businesses.

Schmitt was in St. Louis on Thursday to announce changes in Missouri’s Linked Deposit Program. That program places state money into banks, and those dollars can then be used for low-interest loans.

Wash U medical resident Pawina Jiramongkolchai presents Joe Weissmann with a smell test.
Shahla Farzan | St. Louis Public Radio

Two years ago, Joe Weissmann lost something many take for granted: his sense of smell.

“I still eat, but I don’t enjoy it near as much, because I can’t taste any food or have any sensation of smell,” said Weissmann, a lifelong St. Louis resident and retired sheet metal worker.

Still, Weissmann hasn’t lost hope. He is now a participant in a Washington University research study designed to understand how the brain changes after a person loses their sense of smell. The goal is to eventually develop a treatment for long-term smell loss.


Artist Shea Brown and Sunni Hutton from the Dutchtown South Community Corporation hold up a meditation pouf made out of plastic bags. March 2018
Eli Chen | St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis artists plan to unveil two public art installations in the next couple weeks to draw attention to rampant illegal dumping in the Dutchtown neighborhood. 

Artist Shea Brown is building a "meditation and serenity station" made out of plastic bags that will be located at the corner of Virginia Avenue and Liberty Street. Another artist, Ann Johnson, is building a garden-inspired archway out of plastic barbecue-sauce jugs that will be illuminated by LED lights.

The Dutchtown South Community Corporation commissioned the two projects as a part of its public outreach campaign called "So Fresh, So Clean, So Creative Southside St. Louis" to reduce waste in the neighborhood.

The region actually grew slightly from 2016 to 2017, but Baltimore and other cities gained more residents in the same period.
David Kovaluk | St. Louis Public Radio

The latest estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau show that the St. Louis metropolitan area continues to lose ground compared to other cities.

Data released Thursday show the area, which includes St. Louis City and 14 neighboring Missouri and Illinois counties, dropped to the 21st most populous metropolitan area in 2017. Baltimore replaced St. Louis in the 20th position.

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens speaks to reporters after the 2017 adjourned. Greitens didn't have the smoothest relationship with legislators, including Republicans that control both chambers of the Missouri General Assembly.
File photo | Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated March 21 at 5:45 p.m. with comments from Wednesday's hearing — Gov. Eric Greitens will go on trial in May in St. Louis for felony invasion of privacy.

St. Louis Circuit Judge Rex Burlison on Wednesday denied an attempt by Greitens' defense team to start the trial in April, in order to get it done before a special state House committee investigating the governor finishes its work.


Hear the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra broadcast tonight at 8

Gemma New conducts works by Rimsky-Korsakov, Rautavaara, Tüür and Respighi featuring piccolo Ann Choomack.

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