St. Louis Public Radio
The St. Louis nonprofit Prison Performing Arts has been putting on plays with incarcerated people for 19 years. Here, two women at the penitentiary in Vandalia, Missouri rehearse a scene from "Hip Hop Hamlet." 10/11/18
Jeremy D. Goodwin | St. Louis Public Radio

In 'Hip Hop Hamlet,' women prisoners express their humanity: 'I didn't feel like I was incarcerated'

It’s opening night for “Hip Hop Hamlet” and more than 200 women dressed in baggy, khaki-colored clothes have packed into the gymnasium at the women’s penitentiary in Vandalia, Missouri. They’re eager to watch fellow members of the prison population perform a beat-filled, rap adaptation of the Shakespeare text. Shakespeare scholars say his work offers ways to get in touch with what makes a person fully human. For the women participating in this show, that plays out at a very basic level.

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Under the new law, registered voters can bring one of four IDs to the polling place: a state-issued driver's license, a state-issued non-driver's license, a U.S. passport or a military ID.
Rici Hoffarth | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated Oct. 10 with statement from Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft -- A Cole County judge has rejected a sworn statement that Missouri voters who wanted to use non-photo forms of identification had to sign in order to vote.

But Richard Callahan’s ruling, issued Tuesday, says most of the identification requirement the Missouri Legislature created in 2016 “is within its constitutional prerogative under the Missouri Constitution."

Joining host Don Marsh (at left) for Tuesday's discussion were (from center left) four-time Tony nominee Terrence Mann, Variety CEO Jan Albus and Variety teen performer Selah Harris.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Musical-theater aficionados likely associate four-time Tony nominee Terrence Mann with the original Rum Tum Tugger of “Cats,” Inspector Javert in “Les Miserables” or perhaps one of the titular characters in “Beauty and the Beast.” Now the acclaimed actor is diving into yet another key role – this one on a St. Louis stage that will take him under the sea as King Triton.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, while taking a break from rehearsals for Variety Theatre’s upcoming production of “The Little Mermaid,” Mann joined host Don Marsh for a conversation alongside two St. Louisans who are also involved in the show.

Teenage performer Selah Harris was one of them, and when Marsh asked her what it’s like to work with someone as esteemed as Mann, Harris described the opportunity as “really amazing” in terms of boosting her drive and confidence as a young performer.

Alyson Thompson (left) and Kathryn Stinson (right) give advice and stress the importance of avoiding physical and emotional burnout.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

Burnout, or the physical or mental collapse caused by overwork or stress, is an issue many people face in their day-to-day lives. Among those commonly susceptible to it are teachers, social service workers, activists and first responders.

On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed ways in which people who are invested in emotionally draining work can avoid burnout and practice self-care. Joining the conversation were licensed professional counselor Kathryn Stinson and Alyson Thompson, co-founder of The 4A Project.

St. Louis civic leaders, members of the Taylor family, which owns Enterprise Holdings, and World Wide Technology Jim Kavanaugh announced plans to form a bid to attract a Major League Soccer expansion team in St. Louis. Oct. 9, 2018.
Melody Walker | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at Oct. 9 at 4:50 p.m with comments from Major League Soccer —St. Louis is launching a new bid to attract a Major League Soccer team.

Members of the Taylor family, which owns Enterprise Holdings, are joining World Wide Technology CEO Jim Kavanaugh to form the bid for an MLS expansion team.

Students walk down a hallway of Lift for Life Academy, which includes an old bank vault door Life Academy. The charter school opened in the former Manufacturer's Bank and Trust Company building in Kosciusko in 2000.
Ryan Delaney | St. Louis Public Radio

When St. Elizabeth Academy, an all-girls Catholic high school closed in 2013, some of the alumnae and former staff wanted to keep the educational tradition alive with a charter school.

But that building wasn't available and no matter how hard they looked they just couldn't find the right space, said Jane Keuss, who wanted to co-found the planned Tessera Hall Academy.

The HPV vaccine protects against nine forms of the human papillomavirus, which can cause, anong others, cervical and throat cancer. The government recently announced it works for older adults as well as adolescents.
Benjamin W. Stratton | U.S. Air Force

Gynecologists hope the federal Food and Drug Administration's decision to approve human papillomavirus vaccine for older adults could protect more people. Missouri has one of the highest rates of cancer caused by the virus in the nation.

FDA officials previously recommended the Gardasil vaccine for those between ages 9 and 26. On Friday, the agency expanded the vaccine for those up to 45.

HPV is a skin virus that’s spread through sexual contact. There are many types of HPV and some eventually cause cancer in men and women, including cervical and throat cancer.

Members of National Association of Letter Carriers rallied against privatization of the U.S. Postal Service in cities around the country including St. Louis on Monday.
Melody Walker | St. Louis Public Radio

Wearing bright blue T-shirts with the slogan “U.S. Mail — Not for Sale,” about 80 postal workers gathered Monday in downtown St. Louis.

They joined postal workers across the country rallying against a plan floated by the Trump administration to privatize the U.S. Postal Service.

(L-R) Gabriela Ramirez-Arellano, Carol Lara and Ness Sandoval talk about the experience of running small businesses and the influence of Hispanic businesses in the region.
Evie Hemphill | St. Louis Public Radio

While Missouri may not be the first state that comes to mind as home to a thriving Hispanic/Latino population, data shows that the demographic is growing rapidly and in turn directly impacting the economics of the region.

Over a span of five years, the number of Hispanic-owned businesses in the region has increased by 42 percent, according to the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of St. Louis. Additionally, Missouri ranks sixth in the nation for its number of Hispanic residents with a bachelor’s degree or higher.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh discussed the influence Hispanic business owners have on the region in light of Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15 to Oct. 15) with Gabriela Ramirez-Arellano, business counselor at the HCC and co-host of the bilingual business podcast DmeToo.

Washington University historian Peter Kastor joined host Don Marsh for a special Columbus Day segment of St. Louis on the Air to discuss Christopher Columbus's complex legacy.
EVIE HEMPHILL | ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO

This summer, Tower Grove Park administrators announced the establishment of a commission to address mounting calls to remove the statue of Christopher Columbus currently exhibited in the public park.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air host Don Marsh addressed the issue of Columbus’s complex legacy with Peter Kastor, professor and chair of the Department of History at Washington University.

Marsh also heard from Bill Reininger, the executive director of Tower Grove Park, regarding the status of the commission tasked with determining the future of the Columbus statue.

Mary Elizabeth Coleman plans her route for canvassing while holding her son Gerhardt. Coleman is part of a historic surge in female candidates across the country and here in Missouri. This year 103 women are on Missouri's November ballot.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

As Mary Elizabeth Coleman drives her kids to school, her SUV is a cacophony of chatter. At a stoplight she pulls up behind a car with a "Jesus loves feminists" bumper sticker.

Coleman says to nobody in particular, “Yesterday was the day that women earned the right to vote! 98 years ago … ” She trails off as her footnote to the bumper sticker is drowned out by the shrieking of her baby and a barrage of school drop-off questions from her other kids.

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St. Louis on the Air

Behind the Headlines: Second chance for Major League Soccer in St. Louis

Host Don Marsh discussed the newly announced effort to bring a team to the region.