All Things Considered

Melissa Block and Robert Siegel

In-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.Melissa Block and Robert Siegel

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Music Interviews
5:34 pm
Sun January 27, 2013

Big Freedia Lays Out The Basics Of Bounce

Big Freedia (the stage name of New Orleans native Freddie Ross) is one of the biggest stars of the hip-hop subculture known as bounce.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 10:29 am

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World
3:58 pm
Sun January 27, 2013

Egyptian President Declares State Of Emergency

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 5:34 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SMITH, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Smith.

Friday was the second anniversary of the uprising in Egypt, the topple of the president there, Hosni Mubarak. The anniversary sparked massive protests against the new government, the Islamist government. The violence has left more than 40 people dead.

In a forceful address to the nation earlier today, Egypt's president declared a 30-day state of emergency in three Egyptian cities. NPR's Leila Fadel joins us to discuss the latest. Hey, Leila.

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Politics
3:58 pm
Sun January 27, 2013

The Senate And Its Finicky Filibuster Relationship

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 5:34 pm

This week, the Senate passed a rules change to make it just a little harder for members to start a filibuster. Some think it's not enough action, and others think it's too limiting, but most agree that a compromise is better than nothing. Weekends on All Things Considered host Robert Smith talks with political scientist Sarah Binder about how the filibuster grew in to such a road-blocking nuisance in the first place, and asks Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M., and Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., what these changes will mean for the senate filibuster.

Author Interviews
3:21 pm
Sun January 27, 2013

'Manifest Injustice': A 40-Year Fight For Freedom

Henry Holt

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 5:34 pm

In 1962, a grisly double murder on a deserted stretch of desert rocked a small community outside Phoenix.

A young couple had been shot to death in a case that stumped Maricopa County investigators. Then, something happened that should have cracked it wide open: A man named Ernest Valenzuela confessed to the crime. But police didn't pursue the lead, just one misstep in an investigation and eventual trial that were rife with irregularities.

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U.S.
5:34 pm
Sat January 26, 2013

Investing In Citizenship: For The Rich, A New Road To The U.S.

The Barclays Center in New York, the new home of the Brooklyn Nets, was built partially with investment from overseas donors seeking U.S. citizenship. A little-known immigration program allows wealthy investors to get a green card in exchange for funding American businesses.
Bruce Bennett Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 1:17 pm

The traditional immigrant story is a familiar one.

Someone who longs for a better life makes the tough journey, leaves behind the hardships of his or her native land and comes to the United States to start again. That story, in a lot of ways, helped build this country.

These days, however, there's a very different kind of immigrant who wants to come to this country — the rich — and they have a different set of dreams.

Anthony Korda was a barrister, or lawyer, in England who vacationed frequently in the U.S. with his family.

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Author Interviews
4:40 pm
Sat January 26, 2013

Ship Those (Virtual) Chips: The Rise And Fall Of Online Poker's Youngest Crew

Ship It Holla Ballas by Jonathan Grotenstein and Storms Reback.
Guy Bubb Courtesy Getty Images/Gallo Images

Originally published on Sat January 26, 2013 5:59 pm

In the early 2000s, the get-rich-quick scheme of choice for young college dropouts was poker — and not your grandfather's poker, with clinking chips on green felt tables. Online poker. For a few years it was a national obsession for a generation of young men who grew up playing hours and hours of video games.

Many of these players couldn't get into casinos because they were underage, but they used their brains and introductory statistics courses to rake in millions, often playing 10 or more games simultaneously on huge computer monitors.

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Analysis
4:02 pm
Sat January 26, 2013

Week In News: A Rocky Start To Obama's Second

Originally published on Sat January 26, 2013 5:34 pm

Less than a week into his second term, President Obama has already met with resistance over procedural matters, such as his use of the recess appointment to circumvent the Senate confirmation process. Weekends on All Things Considered host Robert Smith speaks with James Fallows, national correspondent for The Atlantic.

Performing Arts
4:02 pm
Sat January 26, 2013

The 'Life And Times' Takes Audiences On A Lengthy Journey

Originally published on Sat January 26, 2013 5:34 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SMITH, HOST:

Hey, thanks for sticking with us. It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Smith.

Opening this week in New York City, you can see a musical that demands a little something extra from its audience: endurance. The show is called "Life and Times," and it is more than 10 hours from start to finish. It's a production of Soho Rep at the Public Theater. And before the musical starts, the audience has that focus that you only see in marathon runners, preparing for the long haul.

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World
4:02 pm
Sat January 26, 2013

Predictions, Warnings Round Out World Economic Forum

Originally published on Sat January 26, 2013 5:34 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SMITH, HOST:

I don't know about you, but there's been something wrong in the United States this week. It felt a little bit - I don't know - more poor, less fabulous. Ah, of course, of course, the rich and powerful folks of the world and the United States are all in Davos, Switzerland, attending the World Economic Forum. That's where the big names in business and politics get together in the Alps.

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Around the Nation
6:32 pm
Fri January 25, 2013

To Combat Suicides, Army Focuses On The Homefront

Alicia McCoy holds a photo of her husband, Sgt. Brandon McCoy. Despite taking part in basewide suicide prevention efforts at Fort Campbell in 2009, Sgt. McCoy took his own life in 2012.
Blake Farmer for NPR

When Sgt. Brandon McCoy returned from Iraq, he showed signs of post-traumatic stress disorder. His wife, Alicia, remembers him being on edge in public.

"I'm watching him, and his trigger finger never stopped moving, constantly," says Alicia.

Four years later, after he returned from a tour in Afghanistan in 2011, she says, she'd wake up with his hands wrapped around her throat. She told him: Get help or get a divorce. So he scheduled an appointment and — along with Alicia — trekked to the Fort Campbell hospital located on the Tennessee-Kentucky border.

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