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Strange News
9:51 am
Wed May 1, 2013

High Schoolers Show Up For Prom On Wrong Night

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

Prom is the high school highlight for many teens. But maybe not for 400 students from Bloomington High here in Southern California, who showed up for their prom a week early. The invitations had the wrong date. Faced with students in gowns and rented tuxes, the venue managed a makeshift party complete with DJ and chicken strips. One mother wasn't impressed. Those chicken strips, she said, were the most expensive the kids would ever eat.

National Security
5:37 am
Wed May 1, 2013

Boston Bombing Investigators Cover A Lot Of Ground

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 9:51 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

All right, let's bring in NPR's counter-terrorism correspondent Dina Temple-Raston, to update us on the investigation into the Boston Marathon attack.

And, Dina, we just heard from Corey Flintoff all about the Russian Republic of Dagestan. And U.S. officials have been there already to see if there are leads to follow.

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NPR Story
4:45 am
Wed May 1, 2013

Decision Day: High School Seniors Secure Spots In College With Deposits

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 9:51 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Here in the United States, this is a big day for many high school seniors. It is College Decision Day, May 1st. It's when many seniors have to send in their deposits to college to secure a place in next year's freshman class. For many, this decision caps a long college application process. And to find out what it's been like, we visited a high school here in Washington D.C.

NICK VITALE: My name is Nicholas Vitale. I'm 18 years old and I'm a senior here at Gonzaga College High School. And I applied to six colleges.

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NPR Story
4:45 am
Wed May 1, 2013

J.C. Penney Wins Legal Fight Over Martha Stewart

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 9:51 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Proof of Martha Stewart's ongoing commercial appeal has been on display in a New York courtroom. Yesterday, an appeals court decided that department store J.C. Penney can continue selling a new line of housewares designed by Stewart. But the ruling keeps Macy's from having the exclusive rights to the brand.

NPR's Sonari Glinton reports.

SONARI GLINTON, BYLINE: There is one reason why both J.C. Penney and Macy's want Martha Stewart.

MARSHAL COHEN: She's had a history of having success.`

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It's All Politics
3:06 am
Wed May 1, 2013

Markey, Gomez Vie For John Kerry's Senate Seat

Republican Senate hopeful Gabriel Gomez celebrates with supporters as he makes his way to the stage to deliver a victory speech Tuesday in Cohasset, Mass.
Steven Senne AP

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 9:51 am

Veteran Democratic Rep. Ed Markey, who has been in office for 36 years, and novice Republican Gabriel Gomez will face off in the race to become the next U.S. senator from Massachusetts. They won their party primaries Tuesday in the special election to fill the seat vacated by Secretary of State John Kerry.

Officials say voter turnout was light. The race for the open Senate seat has been overshadowed by the deadly Boston Marathon bombings.

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Business
2:20 am
Wed May 1, 2013

Would You Pay A Higher Price For 'Ethical' Clothing?

The Joe Fresh store in New York City. Some of the clothes made in the building that collapsed last week in Bangladesh were destined for the brand.
Stephen Lovekin Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 9:51 am

Look at photographs from the Bangladesh garment factory collapse, and you can see clothing in the rubble destined for a store called Joe Fresh, one of the many retailers using supercheap fashions made overseas to keep shoppers buying often.

But in the aftermath of the tragedy, would customers pay more if they knew the clothes were made by workers treated fairly and safely?

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The Salt
2:19 am
Wed May 1, 2013

Antibiotic-Resistant Bugs Turn Up Again In Turkey Meat

A truckload of live turkeys arrives at a Cargill plant in Springdale, Ark., in 2011. Most turkeys in the U.S. are regularly given low doses of antibiotics.
Danny Johnston AP

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 4:29 pm

Consumer groups are stepping up pressure on animal producers and their practice of giving antibiotics to healthy animals to prevent disease. In two new reports, the groups say they're worried that the preventive use of antibiotics is contributing to the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which get harder to treat in humans and animals over time.

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Explosions At Boston Marathon
2:18 am
Wed May 1, 2013

Investigating The Boston Bombing ... In Southern Russia

Investigators work at the site of a bombing in the Dagestan capital, Makhachkala, last year. The blasts near a police post killed at least 15 people. The southern Russian republic has seen persistent violence.
AFP Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 8:59 pm

The search for the motivations of the alleged Boston Marathon bombers stretches from New England to Central Asia, but a lot of attention has been focused on Dagestan.

The mostly Muslim republic is located in the southernmost part of Russia, and it's been the battleground in a low-level insurgency that takes lives nearly every day.

One of the suspects, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, traveled to Dagestan twice in recent years, and investigators want to know whether that experience led him toward a radical and violent form of Islam.

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The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
2:14 am
Wed May 1, 2013

For A Black Doctor, Building Trust By Slowing Down

Dr. Gregory McGriff, who serves a predominantly white community, says he finds he has to communicate a bit more than his white colleagues to earn his patients' trust.
Courtesy of Gregory McGriff

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 8:58 pm

It may be hard to imagine that people can distill their thoughts on a topic as complicated as race into just six words. But thousands of people have done just that for The Race Card Project, in which NPR host/special correspondent Michele Norris invites people to send in their microstories about race and cultural identity.

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Code Switch
11:03 pm
Tue April 30, 2013

On 'Hicksploitation' And Other White Stereotypes Seen On TV

Some of the cast members of the reality show Duck Dynasty find themselves handcuffed to one another.
A&E

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 7:10 am

On cable TV, there's a whole truckload of reality shows that make fun of working-class, white Southern culture. They are some of the most popular and talked about new shows, too, such as Here Comes Honey Boo Boo and Duck Dynasty.

MTV tried cashing in on the redneck TV trend with its own hyped-up platform for young Southern kids behaving badly, Buckwild. It played like a Southern-fried version of Jersey Shore. Its stars were a dimwitted crew of young people in West Virginia drinking hard and riding pickup trucks through ditches filled with mud.

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