Morning Edition

Steve Inskeep & Renee Montagne

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 13 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 19 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182a946e1c876c6464716c0|5182a93be1c876c6464716bd

Pages

NPR Story
4:09 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Inmates To Be Moved Temporarily Out Of Infamous Iraqi Prison

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 10:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

And I'm Kelly McEvers. It's a name that conjures up grim images. Abu Ghraib prison. Once the site of prisoner abuse and torture, first under Saddam Hussein then under U.S. occupation, the prison temporarily closed this week. The decision comes as a Sunni-led insurgency in Western Iraq, near Abu Ghraib, is targeting Iraq's Shiite-led government in Baghdad.

Read more
NPR Story
4:09 am
Fri April 18, 2014

Plunge In Circulation Forces Changes At Japanese Magazine

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 10:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is: Wonderful Wife.

It's the name of a women's magazine in Japan. It used to be a top seller back when more women stayed home and took care of their kids.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

But times have changed. As more women work even after having kids, Wonderful Wife has plunged in circulation. So the publisher says it's taking Wonderful Wife off the racks and replacing it with a new magazine aimed at working mothers.

Read more
Planet Money
6:41 am
Thu April 17, 2014

To Increase Productivity, UPS Monitors Drivers' Every Move

Elise Amendola AP

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 7:33 am

The American workforce might want to pay attention to all those brown trucks full of cardboard boxes. UPS is using technology in ways that may soon be common throughout the economy.

On the surface, UPS trucks look the same as they did more than 20 years ago, when Bill Earle started driving for the company in rural Pennsylvania.

But underneath the surface, Earle says, the job has changed a lot. The thing you sign your name on when the UPS guy gives you a package used to be a piece of paper. Now it's a computer that tells Earle everything he needs to know.

Read more
Europe
5:30 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Salon Uses Image Of North Korea's Leader To Promote Discount

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:41 am

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Kelly McEvers. A salon in London recently used an image of North Korea's leader to promote a discount. Bad hair day? - said the sign with a picture of Kim Jong-un - 15 percent off all gent cuts through the month of April.

Around the Nation
5:09 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Lost Sea Lion Pup Found In California Almond Orchard

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 5:43 am

The pup was discovered 100 miles from the ocean. It mostly likely swam up the San Joaquin River, hopped out and couldn't find its way back.

Race
4:31 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Probe: Gains Of Integration Eroded, Especially In The South

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:41 am

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Kelly McEvers.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

This spring will mark 60 years since Brown versus Board of Education. That's the Supreme Court ruling that was intended to end segregation in America's public schools. But a year-long study by the investigative journalism group ProPublica finds that we've never gotten to that goal. In fact, America in recent decades has been moving backward.

Read more
NPR Story
4:07 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Does Business Innovation Depend On A CEO's Age?

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:41 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

One of the keys to success for a company or even a country is the ability to innovate, to create new ideas and products that change how people work, live and behave. And there's now new research suggesting that innovation could depend on the age of the people in charge. Of course innovation is just one measure of success. NPR's social science correspondent Shankar Vedantam has returned to join us. Shankar, good morning to you.

SHANKAR VEDANTAM, BYLINE: Hi, David.

GREENE: So what's this new research about?

Read more
NPR Story
4:07 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Pay It Forward Proposal Could Help Students Afford College

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:41 am

A new idea is making the rounds in education circles. Under the plan, states would allow students to go to college for free then they would pay back a percentage of their salaries after they graduate.

NPR Story
4:07 am
Thu April 17, 2014

Geneva Talks Aim To Ease Tensions In Ukraine Crisis

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 6:41 am

Secretary of State John Kerry is in Geneva to meet with his diplomatic counterparts from Russia, Ukraine and the European Union. They are trying to find a resolution to the crisis in Ukraine.

Animals
5:55 am
Wed April 16, 2014

Police Trace Heavy-Breathing Emergency Caller

Originally published on Wed April 16, 2014 3:33 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Police near London received a troubling emergency call. All the dispatcher could hear was heavy breathing. Cops rushed out to investigate, and found the caller running through a yard. It was a dog with a wireless phone in its mouth.

The Belgian Malinois named Layton must have tooth-dialed 999 - Britain's version of 911 - after snatching the phone from its owner. The owner told the Daily Mirror: He's downright naughty, but I would never swap him.

Pages