Morning Edition

Steve Inskeep & Renee Montagne

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 13 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 19 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

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NPR Story
4:25 am
Wed June 11, 2014

Clevelanders Discuss Replacing Sin Tax With Win Tax

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 11:55 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Business
4:25 am
Wed June 11, 2014

Community Sourced Capital Connects Businesses With Local Funds

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 6:46 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And small businesses are finding ways to raise money, outside the banking system, alternatives include Kickstarter. From member station WVTF in Virginia, Beverly Amsler reports on another lending site that serves small business, one that capitalizes on community spirit.

PENNIE AHUERO: We've got chocolate peanut butter and samoa.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Oh, boy.

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Europe
7:23 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Love Locks Weigh Paris Bridge Down

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. Happy couples have attached one too many love locks to a popular bridge in Paris. The bridge closed last night after part of it crumbled under the weight of thousands of padlocks, hooked there to symbolize endless love. Thousands of Parisians have signed a petition to remove all those locks, but this morning the bridge reopened to pedestrians. So Paris remains locked in battle over a lover's tradition for a little while longer. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
7:23 am
Tue June 10, 2014

We Said 'Tie', Listeners Told Us We Were Wrong

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Yesterday we reported on the U.S. men's soccer team as it heads to Brazil for the World Cup. Shortly afterwards, a scolding tweet came in over a misuse of some sports language. Soccer matches, we were told, don't tie, they draw. You also don't say two goals to nothing - it's two to nil. Like this...

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED ANNOUNCER: Manchester United now they are stopped by two goals to nil.

Politics
4:50 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Clinton Sought 'Tougher Deal,' But Won't Second-Guess Bergdahl Swap

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 1:38 pm

Below are excerpts from Hillary Clinton's interview Monday with NPR's Renee Montagne. Clinton's new book, Hard Choices, will be published Tuesday.

Portions of this interview will air on Morning Edition.

On running for president in 2016

HILLARY CLINTON: I have made some hard choices, and I face some hard choices. And, as I say in the book, I have not made a decision yet. ...

RENEE MONTAGNE: This is, may I say, a classic campaign book. ...

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NPR Story
4:39 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Supreme Court Rules BP Must Keep Paying For Spill

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 11:30 am

Under a legal settlement, BP has been sending money to businesses affected by the 2010 Gulf of Mexico spill. The company said the terms of the settlement are being misinterpreted. The court disagreed.

Asia
4:37 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Taliban Claim Credit For Another Attack In Karachi

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 11:25 am

Militants are attacking a security training facility near the Karachi airport. The incident comes less than two days after a deadly attack on the Karachi airport itself.

NPR Story
4:09 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Author: 2nd Amendment's Only Sentence Generates Recurrent Debate

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 7:23 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We're going to hear next about the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. It's a short one.

MICHAEL WALDMAN: One sentence, lots of commas and lots of confusion.

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Parallels
7:50 am
Mon June 9, 2014

Escaping South Sudan's Violence Often Means Going Hungry

Women carry sticks in Ganyliel, South Sudan, an area protected from the violence in the country due to its isolation. But food there is scarce.
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 9:00 am

Even in an undeveloped country like South Sudan, Ganyliel can feel like the middle of nowhere: a bunch of tiny islands surrounded by a gigantic swampy floodplain fed by the River Nile during rainy season. To get here, I took a helicopter from the capital, then ditched my sneakers for gumboots. I've waded out into water that's too deep for an SUV and too shallow for a speedboat.

I board a canoe made from a hollowed-out palm tree.

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Around the Nation
7:14 am
Mon June 9, 2014

After Shootings, Extended Silence: What The Border Patrol Hasn't Said

Maria Guadelupe Guereca Betancourt, a resident of Juarez, Mexico, lost her son Sergio, 15, when he was shot under the black bridge that spans the border from El Paso, Texas, to Juarez.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 10:42 pm

The U.S. Border Patrol is becoming more transparent, according to the commissioner who oversees it.

Still, there is much the agency has yet to disclose.

The agency has repeatedly used deadly force along the U.S.-Mexico border while providing little or no information about what happened or why. What follows are the stories of four notable killings that have raised unanswered questions between 2010 and 2014.

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