Joe Palca http://news.stlpublicradio.org en The Scientist Who Makes Stars On Earth http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/scientist-who-makes-stars-earth Transcript <p>AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: <p>From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.<p>On the outskirts of Albuquerque, New Mexico, scientists are doing something astonishing. They're creating a white dwarf star - not a whole star but enough of one to study in minute detail. Thu, 06 Mar 2014 21:16:00 +0000 Joe Palca 34223 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org To Clean Drinking Water, All You Need Is A Stick http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/clean-drinking-water-all-you-need-stick Removing all the dangerous bacteria from drinking water would have enormous health benefits for people around the world.<p>The technologies exist for doing that, but there's a problem: cost.<p>Now a scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology thinks he's on to a much less expensive way to clean up water.<p>MIT's <a href="http://meche.mit.edu/people/?id=279">Rohit Karnik</a> is a mechanical engineer who works on water technologies. He says it's relatively easy to make membranes that can filter the bacteria out of water. Wed, 05 Mar 2014 21:30:00 +0000 Joe Palca 34191 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org To Clean Drinking Water, All You Need Is A Stick Scientists Come Close To Finding True Magnetic Monopole http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/scientists-come-close-finding-true-magnetic-monopole Transcript <p>DAVID GREENE, HOST: <p>Scientists may have filled in a gap in one the fundamental theories of physics. We've always been told that magnets have two poles, north and south. But theory suggests there should be something called a magnetic monopole, a magnet that has either a north pole or a south pole but not both of them. So far no one has found this elusive magnetic monopole.<p>As part of his project, Joe's Big Idea, NPR's Joe Palca brings us the story of scientists at Amherst College in Massachusetts. They have created a synthetic magnetic monopole. Fri, 31 Jan 2014 10:04:00 +0000 Joe Palca 33380 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org 'The Coolest Thing Ever': How A Robotic Arm Changed 4 Lives http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/coolest-thing-ever-how-robotic-arm-changed-4-lives <p>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N1jbEvhFzQM</p> Thu, 28 Nov 2013 08:05:00 +0000 Joe Palca 31805 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org 'The Coolest Thing Ever': How A Robotic Arm Changed 4 Lives Why Painting Tumors Could Make Brain Surgeons Better http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/why-painting-tumors-could-make-brain-surgeons-bette Perhaps one of the most uncomfortable things a doctor has to tell patients is that their medical problems are iatrogenic. What that means is they were caused by a doctor in the course of the treatment.<p>Sometime these iatrogenic injuries are accidental. But sometimes, because of the limits of medical technology, they can be inevitable. Thu, 12 Sep 2013 07:45:00 +0000 Joe Palca 29838 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Why Painting Tumors Could Make Brain Surgeons Better Coronal Holes: The (Rarely Round) Gaps In The Sun's Atmosphere http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/coronal-holes-rarely-round-gaps-suns-atmosphere There's a hole in the sun's corona. But don't worry — that happens from time to time.<p>"A coronal hole is just a big, dark blotch that we see on the sun in our images," says <a href="http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/mission/team/team_pesnell.php">Dean Pesnell</a>, project scientist for NASA's <a href="http://sdo.gsfc.nasa.gov/mission/team/team_pesnell.php">Solar Dynamics Observatory</a>. "We can only see them from space, because when we look at them [through] a regular telescope, they don't appear."<p>That's because you have to look at wavelengths of light that the human eye can't see. Thu, 05 Sep 2013 19:38:00 +0000 Joe Palca 29677 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Coronal Holes: The (Rarely Round) Gaps In The Sun's Atmosphere Black Holes One Of Space's Great Paradoxes http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/black-holes-one-spaces-great-paradoxes Late summer tends to be a slow month for news. But at All Things Considered, we put on a two hour program, no matter what. So — without a trace of irony — one of our science correspondents offered to help fill some holes in the show with a series of stories about holes. In this edition: Black holes. Wed, 07 Aug 2013 20:31:00 +0000 Joe Palca 28902 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org If You Want A Doughnut Hole, Don't Ask A Mathematician http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/if-you-want-donut-hole-dont-ask-mathematician Transcript <p>ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: <p>From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.<p>A program such as ours is timed to the exact second, and occasionally, there are small holes when our mix of news and features doesn't quite fill up our two-hour slot.<p>So NPR's Joe Palca offered to come to our rescue with some short math and sciencey hole-filling stories, stories about what else - holes.<p>JOE PALCA, BYLINE: Today, we're going to talk about doughnut holes, those round things you buy in a bakery. Thu, 25 Jul 2013 21:43:00 +0000 Joe Palca 28558 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org All Charged Up: Engineers Create A Battery Made Of Wood http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/all-charged-engineers-create-battery-made-wood The big idea behind <a href="http://www.npr.org/series/156490415/joes-big-idea">Joe's Big Idea</a> is to report on interesting inventions and inventors. Wed, 17 Jul 2013 07:01:00 +0000 Joe Palca 28301 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org All Charged Up: Engineers Create A Battery Made Of Wood Atop A Hawaiian Mountain, A Constant Sniff For Carbon Dioxide http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/atop-hawaiian-mountain-constant-sniff-carbon-dioxide Climate scientists have a good reason to want to get away from it all. To get an accurate picture of the amount of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere, you have to find places where the numbers won't be distorted by cities or factories or even lots of vegetation that can have a major local impact on CO<sub>2</sub> concentrations.<p>Starting in 1958, scientists from the Scripps Institution for Oceanography have been using an instrument on the top of the Mauna Loa volcano in Hawaii to measure CO<sub>2</sub> in the atmosphere. Mon, 13 May 2013 04:30:00 +0000 Joe Palca 26321 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Atop A Hawaiian Mountain, A Constant Sniff For Carbon Dioxide