Dan Charles http://news.stlpublicradio.org en Can Fish Farms Thrive In The USA? http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/future-clean-green-fish-farming-could-be-indoor-factories Why hasn't fish farming taken off in the United States?<p>It's certainly not for lack of demand for the fish. Slowly but surely, seafood that's grown in aquaculture is taking over the seafood section at your supermarket, and the vast majority is imported. The shrimp and tilapia typically come from warm-water ponds in southeast Asia and Latin America. Mon, 07 Apr 2014 21:46:00 +0000 Dan Charles 35109 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Can Fish Farms Thrive In The USA? Chickens That Lay Organic Eggs Eat Imported Food, And It's Pricey http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/chickens-laying-organic-eggs-eat-imported-food-and-its-pricey The other morning, I found myself staring at something strange and unfamiliar: empty grocery shelves with the word "eggs" above them. The store, a Whole Foods Market in Washington, D.C., blamed, in another sign, the dearth on "increased demand for organic eggs."<p>This scene is unfolding in grocery stores across the country. But Whole Foods' sign wasn't telling the whole truth. Thu, 27 Feb 2014 21:40:00 +0000 Dan Charles 34052 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Chickens That Lay Organic Eggs Eat Imported Food, And It's Pricey Should Farmers Give John Deere And Monsanto Their Data? http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/should-farmers-give-john-deere-and-monsanto-their-data Starting this year, farmers across the Midwest can sign up for a service that lets big agribusiness collect data from their farms, minute by minute, as they plant and harvest their crops.<p><a href="http://www.monsanto.com/products/pages/fieldscripts.aspx">Monsanto</a> and <a href="http://www.deere.com/wps/dcom/en_INT/regional_home.page">John Deere</a> are offering competing versions of this service. Wed, 22 Jan 2014 21:52:00 +0000 Dan Charles 33181 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Should Farmers Give John Deere And Monsanto Their Data? Here's How Young Farmers Looking For Land Are Getting Creative http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/heres-how-young-farmers-looking-land-are-getting-creative Across the country, there's a wave of interest in local food. And a <a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2011/12/12/143459793/who-are-the-young-farmers-of-generation-organic">new generation</a> of young farmers is trying to grow it.<p>Many of these farmers — many of whom didn't grow up on farms — would like to stay close to cities. After all, that's where the demand for local food is.<p>The problem is, that's where land is most expensive. Tue, 31 Dec 2013 22:15:00 +0000 Dan Charles 32680 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Here's How Young Farmers Looking For Land Are Getting Creative Drug Companies Accept FDA Plan To Phase Out Some Animal Antibiotic Uses http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/drug-companies-accept-fda-plan-phase-out-some-animal-antibiotic-uses If drug companies follow <a href="http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm378100.htm">guidance</a> issued Wednesday by the Food and Drug Administration, within three years it will be illegal to use medically important antibiotics to make farm animals grow faster or use feed more efficiently.<p>The FDA's announcement wasn't a big surprise; a draft version of the strategy was released more than a year ago.<p>The bigger news is that the two biggest veterinary drug companies, <a href="http://www.elanco.us/">Elanco</a> and <a href="http://www.zoetis.com/">Zoetis</a>, said Wednesday that Wed, 11 Dec 2013 22:00:00 +0000 Dan Charles 32169 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Drug Companies Accept FDA Plan To Phase Out Some Animal Antibiotic Uses What's The Most Important Thing Food Labels Should Tell Us? http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/whats-most-important-thing-food-labels-should-tell-us Food labels have become battlegrounds. Just last week, voters in Washington state narrowly defeated a measure that would have required food manufacturers to reveal whether their products contain genetically modified ingredients.<p>Supporters of the initiative — and similar proposals in other states — say that consumers have a right to know what they're eating.<p>But there are lots of things we might want to know about our food. So what belongs on the label?<p>I went to four deep thinkers about food and asked them what they'd most like to see labeled. Thu, 14 Nov 2013 23:28:00 +0000 Dan Charles 31460 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org What's The Most Important Thing Food Labels Should Tell Us? FDA Moves To Phase Out Remaining Trans Fats In Food Supply http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/fda-moves-phase-out-remaining-trans-fat-food-supply If the Food and Drug Administration has its way, an era of food technology will soon end. Thu, 07 Nov 2013 20:56:38 +0000 Dan Charles 31257 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org FDA Moves To Phase Out Remaining Trans Fats In Food Supply Why Are Pig Farmers Still Using Growth-Promoting Drugs? http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/why-are-pig-farmers-still-using-growth-promoting-drugs It's one of the most controversial practices in agriculture: feeding small amounts of antibiotics to animals in order to make them grow faster.<p>But what if the drugs don't even work very well?<p>There's some good evidence that they don't, at least in pigs. They used to deliver a boost in growth, but that effect has disappeared in recent years or declined greatly.<p>The reason for this is interesting and even paradoxical.<p>Researchers think the antibiotics used to work by suppressing low-grade infections. Mon, 04 Nov 2013 21:09:00 +0000 Dan Charles 31158 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Why Are Pig Farmers Still Using Growth-Promoting Drugs? Heat, Drought Draw Farmers Back To Sorghum, The 'Camel Of Crops' http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/heat-drought-draw-farmers-back-sorghum-camel-crops Much of the world is turning hotter and dryer these days, and it's opening new doors for a water-saving cereal that's been called "the camel of crops": sorghum. In an odd twist, this old-fashioned crop even seems to be catching on among consumers who are looking for "ancient grains" that have been relatively untouched by modern agriculture.<p>Sorghum isn't nearly as famous as the big three of global agriculture: corn, rice and wheat. But maybe it should be. Thu, 31 Oct 2013 21:08:00 +0000 Dan Charles 31080 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Heat, Drought Draw Farmers Back To Sorghum, The 'Camel Of Crops' Kansas Farmers Commit To Taking Less Water From The Ground http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/kansas-farmers-commit-take-less-water-ground If you've flown across Nebraska, Kansas or western Texas on a clear day, you've seen them: geometrically arranged circles of green and brown on the landscape, typically half a mile in diameter. They're the result of pivot irrigation, in which long pipes-on-wheels rotate slowly around a central point, spreading water across cornfields.<p>Yet most of those fields are doomed. Mon, 21 Oct 2013 19:38:00 +0000 Dan Charles 30825 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Kansas Farmers Commit To Taking Less Water From The Ground