Bound by Division http://news.stlpublicradio.org en Urban and rural Missourians divided by views on puppies, state spending http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/urban-and-rural-missourians-divided-views-puppies-state-spending-0 <p><a href="http://stream.publicbroadcasting.net/production/mp3/national/local-national-974677.mp3">http://stream.publicbroadcasting.net/production/mp3/national/local-national-974677.mp3</a></p><p>The St. Louis metro area is considered Missouri&rsquo;s economic engine.&nbsp; But, it&rsquo;s in constant competition with both Kansas City and rural areas for state dollars for schools, roads and other needs.</p><p>Financial interests are not the only things that drive a wedge between city and country dwellers.&nbsp; In this installment of our series &ldquo;Bound by Division,&rdquo; St. Louis Public Radio&rsquo;s Marshall Griffin looks at how the divide between urban and rural interests often comes to a head in Jefferson City.</p><p> Tue, 21 Jun 2011 23:54:41 +0000 Marshall Griffin 1489 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Urban and rural Missourians divided by views on puppies, state spending Bound by Division - Race in St. Louis http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/bound-division-race-st-louis <p>As a commercial strip with a street car line down the middle, Delmar Boulevard formed a natural dividing line between St. Louis’s black and white populations. Lawmakers, banks and Realtors exploited that fact, using restrictive covenants and redlining to transform the natural barrier into a legal one.The practice wasn’t unique to St. Louis – but it was far more strategic, intentional and formal here – and it has left a legacy of Delmar as a psychologically powerful “red line.”</p> Fri, 15 Apr 2011 11:35:00 +0000 Rachel Lippmann 955 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Bound by Division - Race in St. Louis Bound by Division: Local Control of the St. Louis Police Department http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/bound-division-local-control-st-louis-police-department <p><a href="http://stream.publicbroadcasting.net/production/mp3/national/local-national-955084.mp3">http://stream.publicbroadcasting.net/production/mp3/national/local-national-955084.mp3</a></p><p>St. Louis residents pay for the city&rsquo;s police force, but the state controls it.</p><p>While St. Louis&rsquo; mayor sits on the Board of Police Commissioners, Missouri&rsquo;s governor appoints the other four members.</p><p>It&rsquo;s been that way for 150 years, since the outset of the Civil War.</p><p>In recent years, the drumbeat to bring local control back to the city has been growing louder.</p><p>As part of St. Louis Public Radio&rsquo;s continuing Bound By Division series, Maria Altman reports the reasons for and against local control have changed since the Civil War, but it&rsquo;s still an issue that pits the city against the state.</p><p> Tue, 01 Mar 2011 13:02:27 +0000 Maria Altman 622 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Bound by Division: Local Control of the St. Louis Police Department