bacteria http://news.stlpublicradio.org en Wash Your Hands, People! http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/wash-your-hands-people <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Saint Louis County is seeing an unusual spike in a bacterial disease that affects children in daycare centers.</span></p><p>The county has received 71 reports of shigellosis since the start of 2014 ― that’s compared to only a couple of cases in the same time period last year.</p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Dr. Faisal Khan, t</span>he St. Louis County Department of Health's director of communicable disease control, said the disease has obvious symptoms.</p> Thu, 05 Jun 2014 22:04:34 +0000 Véronique LaCapra 36766 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Wash Your Hands, People! Study: Poor Gut Health Persists In Malnourished Children, Even After Treatment http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/study-poor-gut-health-persists-malnourished-children-even-after-treatment <p>New research out of Washington University could help explain why malnourished children suffer long-term health effects, even after medical treatment.</p><p>As young children develop, the community of bacteria and other microbes in their intestines develops with them. In healthy children, the community reaches maturity about the time a child turns two years old.</p><p>Washington University microbiologist Jeff Gordon calls those tens of trillions of intestinal microbes “an organ within an organ,” because of the key role they play in helping people digest food and absorb its nutrients.</p> Wed, 04 Jun 2014 17:02:40 +0000 Véronique LaCapra 36714 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Study: Poor Gut Health Persists In Malnourished Children, Even After Treatment Bird, Plane, Bacteria? Microbes Thrive In Storm Clouds http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/bird-plane-bacteria-microbes-thrive-storm-clouds Microbes are known to be able to thrive in extreme environments, from inside fiery volcanoes to down on the bottom of the ocean. Now scientists have found a surprising number of them living in storm clouds tens of thousands of feet above the Earth. And those airborne microbes could play a role in global climate.<p>It's been known for a long time that there are microscopic life forms floating around high above our heads. Researchers have collected them from the air above rain forests and mountains. They've found them in snow and hail. Tue, 29 Jan 2013 08:38:00 +0000 Véronique LaCapra 8771 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Bird, Plane, Bacteria? Microbes Thrive In Storm Clouds Morning headlines: Monday, Sept. 3, 2012 http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/morning-headlines-monday-sept-3-2012 <p><strong>Isaac dumps rain, but Mo. drought persists</strong></p><p>The National Weather Service says large parts of rural Missouri and Illinois had between three-to-five inches of rainfall this weekend.</p><p>In St. Louis, Oakville received three and a half inches of rain, the most in the metropolitan area.&nbsp; But National Weather Service Meteorologist Jayson Gosselin said it will take much more rain to snap this summer's historic drought.</p> Mon, 03 Sep 2012 14:26:12 +0000 Julie Bierach, Tim Lloyd & The Associated Press 4477 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Morning headlines: Monday, Sept. 3, 2012 Soil may be a source of antibiotic resistance http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/soil-may-be-source-antibiotic-resistance <p>Soil bacteria may be helping to make disease-causing bacteria resistant to antibiotics.</p><p>That’s according to <a href="http://www.sciencemag.org/content/337/6098/1107.abstract">a new study</a> out of Washington University.</p><p>Lead researcher, microbiologist <a href="http://pathology.wustl.edu/faculty/index.php?user=1427&amp;pageload=indi&amp;passed=&amp;sort=">Gautam Dantas</a>, says he and his colleagues found seven genes in farmland soil bacteria that are identical to genes in human pathogens – and that provide resistance to a wide range of antibiotics.</p> Thu, 30 Aug 2012 21:59:23 +0000 Véronique LaCapra 4465 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Soil may be a source of antibiotic resistance We’re not alone: healthy humans have more microbes than cells http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/we-re-not-alone-healthy-humans-have-more-microbes-cells <p>Researchers have completed the first comprehensive census of the human &ldquo;microbiome&rdquo; &mdash; the trillions of bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms that live in and on our bodies.</p><p>The associate director of <a href="http://genome.wustl.edu/">Washington University&rsquo;s Genome Institute</a>, George Weinstock, was one of the project&rsquo;s lead researchers. He says we have about ten times more microbial cells in our body than we have human cells.</p> Wed, 13 Jun 2012 17:15:19 +0000 Véronique LaCapra 3895 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org We’re not alone: healthy humans have more microbes than cells Lab-grown gut microbes could help combat malnutrition, gastrointestinal diseases http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/lab-grown-gut-microbes-could-help-combat-malnutrition-gastrointestinal-diseases <p>Scientists have taken another step toward understanding human nutrition.</p><p>Researchers at <a href="http://medschool.wustl.edu/">Washington University School of Medicine</a> have shown they can grow entire collections of human intestinal microbes in the laboratory.</p><p>Washington University microbiologist Dr. Jeffrey Gordon says his team then transplanted the bacterial communities into previously germ-free mice, to see how the lab-grown bacteria would respond to a human diet.</p> Mon, 21 Mar 2011 22:48:38 +0000 Véronique LaCapra 776 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Lab-grown gut microbes could help combat malnutrition, gastrointestinal diseases