crops http://news.stlpublicradio.org en Horseradish Roots Run Deep In The Metro East http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/horseradish-roots-run-deep-metro-east <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">There's a pretty good chance that the jar of horseradish you have in the refrigerator has its origins in farms located just across the river from St. Louis.</span></p><p>St. Clair and Madison counties in Illinois produce the lion's share of horseradish in the U.S. <span style="line-height: 1.5;">According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, just 16 growers in Illinois harvest horseradish from 1,779 acres, accounting for about 60 percent of the nation's horseradish. Nationally, only about 3,100 acres are in horseradish production.</span></p> Fri, 06 Jun 2014 03:43:04 +0000 Maria Altman 36747 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Horseradish Roots Run Deep In The Metro East Report: 'Significant Portion' Of Extreme Weather Crop Losses Avoidable, But Some Farmers Aren't Sold http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/report-significant-portion-extreme-weather-crop-losses-avoidable-some-farmers-arent-sold <p><em>Reporting from&nbsp;<span style="line-height: 1.5;">Harvest Public Media’s Bill Wheelhouse.</span></em></p><p>Farmers across the country received more than $17 billion in federal crop insurance payouts after last year’s drought. A <a href="http://www.nrdc.org/media/2013/130827.asp?utm_source=feedburner&amp;utm_medium=feed&amp;utm_campaign=Feed%3A+NRDCPressReleases+%28NRDC+Press+Releases%29">report released Tuesday</a> by an environmental group blames farmers for not doing enough to shield the soil against the heat.</p> Tue, 27 Aug 2013 17:59:34 +0000 WUIS 29431 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Report: 'Significant Portion' Of Extreme Weather Crop Losses Avoidable, But Some Farmers Aren't Sold Missouri Crops Behind Schedule, But Conditions Much Improved Over Last Year http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/missouri-crops-behind-schedule-conditions-much-improved-over-last-year <p>The heavy rains that caused flooding across portions of Missouri this spring have also led to improved soil conditions for crops grown in the Show-Me State.</p><p>The exceptionally-wet spring did cause delays in getting corn, cotton and soybeans in the ground.&nbsp; But Bob Garino, Missouri Statistician with the U.S. Department of Agriculture's <a href="http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usdahome">(USDA)</a> state office in Columbia, says conditions are much better than a year ago when 2012's drought and heat wave began to take hold.</p> Fri, 14 Jun 2013 22:52:12 +0000 Marshall Griffin 27412 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Missouri Crops Behind Schedule, But Conditions Much Improved Over Last Year Nation's Drought Gets Worse http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/nations-drought-gets-worse <p>A new report shows that the nation's worst drought in decades is getting worse again, ending an encouraging five-week run of improving conditions.</p><p>The weekly U.S. Drought Monitor report shows that 60.1 percent of the continental U.S. was in some form of drought as of Tuesday. That's up from 58.8 percent the previous week. The portion of the lower 48 states in extreme or exceptional drought - the two worst classifications - also rose, to 19.04 percent from last week's 18.3 percent.</p> Wed, 21 Nov 2012 17:24:12 +0000 Associated Press 6673 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Nation's Drought Gets Worse Why do taxpayers subsidize farmers' insurance? http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/why-do-taxpayers-subsidize-farmers-insurance This summer's drought has hit more than half the states in the country. Crops are suffering, but farmers might not be. Most farmers have crop insurance.<p>U.S. taxpayers spend about $7 billion a year on crop insurance. It's our largest farm subsidy.<p>And this subsidy goes in part to farmers — who will tell you themselves they aren't so sure about the whole idea. "I have an aversion to it," says Jim Traub, a corn and bean farmer in Fairbury, Illinois. Thu, 23 Aug 2012 15:18:44 +0000 4387 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Why do taxpayers subsidize farmers' insurance? Regional farmers say worst drought since 1980s forces tough choices http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/regional-farmers-say-worst-drought-1980s-forces-tough-choices <p>A new report from the United States Department of Agriculture shows the ongoing drought has caused the nation&#39;s cattle herd to shrink by more than 2 million head so far this year.</p><p>Analysts project the dry weather will impact prices in the checkout aisle.</p><p>Today, we have two reports on the effects of the 2012 drought. &nbsp;In this combined feature, Adam Allington&nbsp;takes a look at the region&#39;s corn farmers.</p><p>But first, St. Louis Public Radio&#39;s Tim Lloyd reports on the agonizing choices faced by Missouri cattle ranchers. &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;</p><p> Fri, 27 Jul 2012 10:15:14 +0000 Adam Allington & Tim Lloyd 4192 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Regional farmers say worst drought since 1980s forces tough choices Despite crop insurance, drought still stings farmers http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/despite-crop-insurance-drought-still-stings-farmers Stop by most any unirrigated farm across the lower Midwest and you'll see crops in distress. Midwestern corn and soybean farmers are taking a beating during the recent drought, but it's not likely to drive many out of business.<p>Most of those farmers carry terrific insurance, and the worse the drought becomes, the more individual farmers will be paid for their lost crops. Tue, 24 Jul 2012 14:22:41 +0000 4171 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Despite crop insurance, drought still stings farmers Morning headlines: Tuesday, July 19th, 2011 http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/morning-headlines-tuesday-july-19th-2011 <p><strong>Joplin tornado contributes to unemployment</strong></p><p>Missouri officials say the May 22 tornado in Joplin contributed to the net loss of 13,000 jobs in the state. Joplin alone lost 9,400 jobs in June. The State Department of Economic Development says Missouri&rsquo;s jobless rate fell from 8.9 percent in May to 8.8 percent in June. In recovery efforts, Gov. Jay Nixon will make a speech Tuesday in Joplin to announce what he calls a &ldquo;major initiative to address both the near-term and long-term housing needs.&rdquo;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> Tue, 19 Jul 2011 12:56:10 +0000 Johanna Mayer & The Associated Press 1678 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Morning headlines: Tuesday, July 19th, 2011