microbes http://news.stlpublicradio.org en Study: Poor Gut Health Persists In Malnourished Children, Even After Treatment http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/study-poor-gut-health-persists-malnourished-children-even-after-treatment <p>New research out of Washington University could help explain why malnourished children suffer long-term health effects, even after medical treatment.</p><p>As young children develop, the community of bacteria and other microbes in their intestines develops with them. In healthy children, the community reaches maturity about the time a child turns two years old.</p><p>Washington University microbiologist Jeff Gordon calls those tens of trillions of intestinal microbes “an organ within an organ,” because of the key role they play in helping people digest food and absorb its nutrients.</p> Wed, 04 Jun 2014 17:02:40 +0000 Véronique LaCapra 36714 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Study: Poor Gut Health Persists In Malnourished Children, Even After Treatment We’re not alone: healthy humans have more microbes than cells http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/we-re-not-alone-healthy-humans-have-more-microbes-cells <p>Researchers have completed the first comprehensive census of the human &ldquo;microbiome&rdquo; &mdash; the trillions of bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms that live in and on our bodies.</p><p>The associate director of <a href="http://genome.wustl.edu/">Washington University&rsquo;s Genome Institute</a>, George Weinstock, was one of the project&rsquo;s lead researchers. He says we have about ten times more microbial cells in our body than we have human cells.</p> Wed, 13 Jun 2012 17:15:19 +0000 Véronique LaCapra 3895 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org We’re not alone: healthy humans have more microbes than cells