driving laws http://news.stlpublicradio.org en Supreme Court Weighs Warrantless Blood Tests In Drunken-Driving Cases http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/high-court-considers-mo-case-constitutionality-mandatory-blood-alcohol-tests The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments Wednesday in a case testing whether the police must get a warrant before ordering blood to be drawn from an unwilling drunken-driving suspect.<p>The court has long held that, except in emergency situations, warrants are required when government officials order bodily intrusions like a blood draw. But in Wednesday's case, the state of Missouri and the Obama administration contended that warrants should not be required before administering blood tests to suspected drunken drivers.<p><strong>The Case</strong><p>Tyler McNeely was stopped at 2 a.m. Wed, 09 Jan 2013 22:49:50 +0000 Nina Totenberg 8202 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org US Supreme Court To Hear Mo. Drunk Driving Case On Wednesday http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/us-supreme-court-hear-mo-drunk-driving-case-wednesday <p></p><p><em>Reporting by Jacob McCleland of KRCU.</em></p><p>The United States Supreme Court will hear arguments this Wednesday (today) to determine whether police officers can take blood tests from drunk driving suspects without a warrant.</p><p>The case springs from a drunk driving arrest in Cape Girardeau in 2010.</p> Wed, 09 Jan 2013 10:00:00 +0000 KRCU 8163 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org US Supreme Court To Hear Mo. Drunk Driving Case On Wednesday US Supreme Court To Take On Missouri Drunk Driving Case http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/us-supreme-court-take-missouri-drunk-driving-case <p></p><p><em>Jacob McCleland&nbsp;of KRCU's reporting used in this story.</em><br><br>The US Supreme Court will pick up a case that could determine whether police can legally administer blood tests without a warrant.</p><p>A Missouri State Highway Patrol officer took Tyler McNeely to a Cape Girardeau hospital for blood tests after he failed field sobriety tests but refused the breathalyzer.</p> Tue, 25 Sep 2012 22:59:06 +0000 KRCU 4701 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org US Supreme Court To Take On Missouri Drunk Driving Case On a phone? Driving a car? In Illinois? Make sure you're not breaking any of these new laws http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/phone-driving-car-illinois-make-sure-youre-not-breaking-any-these-new-laws <p>Illinois drivers are coming under more pressure to stay off their cellphones.</p><p>Gov. Pat Quinn<a href="http://www.illinois.gov/PressReleases/ShowPressRelease.cfm?SubjectID=3&amp;RecNum=10411"> signed four laws Friday</a> aimed at making roadways safer.</p><p>Three of them confront the problem of drivers becoming distracted by talking and texting on their cellphones, something that U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood has called a &quot;national epidemic.&quot;</p> Fri, 20 Jul 2012 18:33:08 +0000 The Associated Press 4154 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org On a phone? Driving a car? In Illinois? Make sure you're not breaking any of these new laws Do strict laws keep teens from driving drunk? http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/do-strict-laws-keep-teens-driving-drunk-0 <p>New research out of Washington University suggests the answer is &quot;yes&quot; to our headline question - that laws restricting how late at night teens can drive or how many passengers they can have may also be keeping teens from driving drunk.</p><p>The study used data from 1999 to 2009 on teen drinking and driving in 45 states with graduated driving licensing laws.</p><p>Wash U. psychologist Patricia Cavazos-Rehg led the study. She says states adopted teen driving restrictions at different times, and that some states are stricter than others.</p><p> Fri, 15 Jun 2012 20:08:49 +0000 VĂ©ronique LaCapra 3922 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Do strict laws keep teens from driving drunk? State police out in force on Memorial Day http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/state-police-out-force-memorial-day <p>The Missouri Highway Patrol and the Illinois State Police are urging drivers to slow down, buckle up and eliminate possible distractions in their cars as they return home from the Memorial Day weekend.</p><p>&quot;Inattentive driving is a big problem. We see not only texting on cell phones; we also see reading books and newspapers, putting on makeup, eating full meals in cars,&quot; said Capt. Ron Johnson of the Missouri Highway Patrol.</p> Mon, 28 May 2012 11:30:00 +0000 Bill Raack 3789 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org State police out in force on Memorial Day Morning headlines - Monday, May 28, 2012 http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/morning-headlines-monday-may-28-2012 <p><strong>Todd Epsten dies; former president of the Board of Police Commissioners was chair of the state&#39;s largest liquor distributor</strong></p><p>The former head of the appointed board that oversees the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department has died.</p><p>The <a href="http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/obituaries/todd-epsten-dies-was-on-police-board-and-headed-major/article_a7db3cb6-6bd8-51a5-b5a7-2dc43fbdd931.html">St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports</a> that Todd Epsten, who was the chairman of liquor distributor Major Brands, died Saturday of brain cancer. He was 52.</p> Mon, 28 May 2012 11:18:47 +0000 Rachel Lippmann, The Associated Press & Illinois Public Radio 3793 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Morning headlines - Monday, May 28, 2012 Lead foot? Ill. may get tougher on excessive speeding http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/lead-foot-ill-may-get-tougher-excessive-speeding <p>Illinois may get tougher on drivers who&nbsp;don&#39;t just break the speed limit but shatter it.</p><p>The state Senate voted Friday to deny the option of court&nbsp;supervision when drivers break the limit by certain amounts: over&nbsp;25 mph on city streets and over 30 mph on highways.</p><p> Fri, 30 Mar 2012 17:40:29 +0000 The Associated Press 3396 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Lead foot? Ill. may get tougher on excessive speeding Mo. senator Wright-Jones wants texting ban as secondary offense http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/mo-senator-wright-jones-wants-texting-ban-secondary-offense <p>A proposed compromise to expand Missouri&#39;s texting-while-driving law appears to have fallen flat in a Senate committee.</p><p>The Senate Transportation Committee heard testimony Wednesday on a bill by that would prohibit all drivers - not just those 21 and younger - from texting while driving. Because similar bills have failed in the past, Democratic Sen. Robin Wright-Jones of St. Louis proposed making texting a secondary offense - meaning police would have to pull motorists over for something else before they could write a ticket for texting.</p> Wed, 25 Jan 2012 16:05:54 +0000 The Associated Press 2937 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Mo. senator Wright-Jones wants texting ban as secondary offense Three people killed on Mo. roads over Christmas http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/three-people-killed-mo-roads-over-christmas <p>Fatalities and drunken driving arrests were up this Christmas season, according to the Missouri State Highway Patrol.</p><p>From 6 p.m. Friday until just before midnight on Sunday, state troopers investigated 213 crashes, which included two of the three fatalities and 67 injuries. Fifty-six people were arrested for driving while intoxicated.</p><p>Last year, troopers investigated 487 crashes, including one of two fatalities and 122 injuries, and arrested 51 people for impaired driving.</p><p>This year&#39;s fatalities were:</p> Tue, 27 Dec 2011 15:53:38 +0000 Rachel Lippmann 2754 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Three people killed on Mo. roads over Christmas