Missouri Botanical Garden http://news.stlpublicradio.org en Missouri Botanical Garden Completes Encyclopedia Of Missouri's Native Plants http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/missouri-botanical-garden-completes-encyclopedia-missouris-native-plants <p>The Missouri Botanical Garden has completed a 26-year effort to document the state's native plants.</p><p>The three-volume <a href="http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/media/fact-pages/flora-of-missouri.aspx"><em>Flora of Missouri </em></a>contains illustrations, plant distribution maps, and a detailed description of each species, including its taxonomy, uses, and conservation status.</p><p>This encyclopedic work updates the original <em>Flora of Missouri</em>, first published in 1963 by the late Julian Steyermark.</p> Fri, 23 Aug 2013 19:15:22 +0000 Véronique LaCapra 29344 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Missouri Botanical Garden Completes Encyclopedia Of Missouri's Native Plants Climate Change Prompts Renewed Interest In Native Missouri Grapes http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/climate-change-prompts-renewed-interest-native-missouri-grapes <p>If you are a fan of wine, particularly European wines, from France, Italy or Germany, you can be proud of the role Missouri plays in creating that wine.</p><p>Ever since the mid-1800s <a href="http://www.thehistorychannelclub.com/articles/articletype/articleview/articleid/337/the-louse-that-roared">roots from Missouri </a>grapes have been grafted on to European varieties, because of their natural resistance to certain pests.</p> Wed, 15 May 2013 11:31:00 +0000 Adam Allington 26399 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Climate Change Prompts Renewed Interest In Native Missouri Grapes Spring Gardening Help From The Missouri Botanical Garden http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/spring-gardening-help-missouri-botanical-garden <p>Now that it appears that Spring has arrived in the St. Louis region, the thoughts of many residents are turning to gardening.&nbsp; Efforts thus far have been frustrating for many because of the varying temperatures and large amount of rain.&nbsp; Many have delayed their Spring planting, and those who haven’t may find that the few warm days caused vegetables to flower prematurely and that the cold temperatures at night have harmed them.</p> Tue, 30 Apr 2013 21:59:33 +0000 Mary Edwards, Alex Heuer & Don Marsh 25953 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Spring Gardening Help From The Missouri Botanical Garden St. Louis Area 'Green' Efforts http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/st-louis-area-green-efforts <p>Campaigns to protect our environment and improve sustainability efforts are numerous and ongoing in the St. Louis area.&nbsp; Host Don Marsh talks with environmental experts about what has been done, what is being done, and what still needs to be done to further protect our planet.&nbsp; Tue, 25 Sep 2012 18:43:38 +0000 Alex Heuer, Mary Edwards & Don Marsh 4692 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org St. Louis Area 'Green' Efforts Not just for kids: a field trip to MOBOT's tree canopy climb http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/not-just-kids-field-trip-mobots-tree-canopy-climb <p></p><p>Most of us haven’t scaled a tree since we were kids.</p><p>But it’s not too late!</p><p>On several weekends this fall the Missouri Botanical Garden is giving both adults and kids the chance, with the help of a professional.</p><p>St. Louis Public Radio’s Maria Altman got a birds-eye view of the Garden’s tree canopy climb.</p><p> Thu, 13 Sep 2012 11:25:34 +0000 Maria Altman 4579 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Not just for kids: a field trip to MOBOT's tree canopy climb Odorous 'corpse flower' blooms again at Mo. Botanical Garden http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/odorous-corpse-flower-blooms-again-mo-botanical-garden <p>A second <em>Amorphophallus titanum</em> has bloomed at the Missouri Botanical Garden. It&rsquo;s known as the titan arum &ndash; the flower can reach over six feet tall &ndash; or the &ldquo;corpse flower&rdquo; for its strong smell of rotting meat. The odor attracts flies, which help pollinate the plant.</p><p>The corpse flower can go for years without blooming. When it does, the flower lasts just a few days. Fewer than 160 are known to have bloomed worldwide, in the almost 120 years since the plant was identified by scientists in Sumatra.</p> Wed, 20 Jun 2012 17:17:49 +0000 Véronique LaCapra 3952 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Odorous 'corpse flower' blooms again at Mo. Botanical Garden New Missouri initiative looks to create buzz about bees http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/new-missouri-initiative-looks-create-buzz-about-bees <p><a href="http://mda.mo.gov/">The Missouri Department of Agriculture</a> is launching a new initiative to try to create some buzz about bees.</p><p>Agriculture Director Jon Hagler says &ldquo;<a href="http://agrimissouri.com/the-great-missouri-buzz-off/">The Great Missouri Buzz Off</a>&rdquo; aims to educate Missourians about bees and beekeeping.</p><p>&ldquo;Whether it be honeybees, or native bees, they&rsquo;re so vital to our agriculture&rsquo;s success, and to our horticulture&rsquo;s success, and we have such amazing resources here in our state,&rdquo; Hagler said.</p> Fri, 11 May 2012 20:43:33 +0000 Véronique LaCapra 3682 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org New Missouri initiative looks to create buzz about bees Missouri Botanical Garden to help build online global plant database http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/missouri-botanical-garden-help-build-online-global-plant-database <p>The Missouri Botanical Garden has announced plans to help build an online database of the world&rsquo;s plants.</p><p>Working with the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, and the New York Botanical Garden, the Missouri Botanical Garden will compile information on as many as 400,000 land plant species, with the goal of having all the data available online by 2020.</p> Mon, 23 Apr 2012 10:00:00 +0000 Véronique LaCapra 3535 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Missouri Botanical Garden to help build online global plant database MOBOT scientists help rediscover two tree species thought to be extinct http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/mobot-scientists-help-rediscover-two-tree-species-thought-be-extinct <p>Scientists at the Missouri Botanical Garden have confirmed the discovery of two tree species that were thought to be extinct.</p><p>Last year botanists from the University of <a href="http://g.co/maps/8247m">Dar es Salaam</a> in Tanzania set out to look for the trees. They discovered small populations of both species in a remote forest in southeastern Tanzania, along Africa&rsquo;s eastern coast.</p><p>Missouri Botanical Garden botanist Roy Gereau worked with British scientist Phil Clarke to confirm the identity of the trees.</p> Fri, 30 Mar 2012 19:38:59 +0000 Véronique LaCapra 3397 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org MOBOT scientists help rediscover two tree species thought to be extinct Studying climate change in the Himalayas: the Missouri Botanical Garden's Jan Salick http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/studying-climate-change-himalayas-missouri-botanical-gardens-jan-salick <p>The Himalayan mountain range in Asia is one of the highest places in the world, with several peaks rising above 8,000 meters. It&rsquo;s also one of the most <a href="http://www.gloria.ac.at/">vulnerable to climate change</a>.</p><p>Seven years ago, <a href="http://www.wlbcenter.org/staff_salick.htm">Missouri Botanical Garden senior curator of ethnobotany Jan Salick</a> traveled to the Himalayas to begin a study of how climate change is affecting alpine plants&mdash;and the local people who depend on them.</p><p>St. Louis Public Radio&#39;s Véronique LaCapra sat down with Salick to talk about her research.</p><p> Mon, 19 Mar 2012 11:00:00 +0000 Véronique LaCapra 3279 at http://news.stlpublicradio.org Studying climate change in the Himalayas: the Missouri Botanical Garden's Jan Salick