News

Rep. Lacy Clay
St. Louis Public Radio

Updated 12:15 p.m., Feb. 1 with additional numbers - U.S. Rep. William Lacy Clay, D-University City, holds a huge financial lead over his Democratic challenger in next summer’s primary, state Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal.

According to campaign finance reports filed this weekend, Clay has $423,250 in the bank. That compares to $25,186 for Chappelle-Nadal. 

Yvonne Sparks of St. Louis (left) was sworn in as a member of the University of Missouri Board of Curators in December. She resigned from the board this week.
Dale Singer | St. Louis Public Radio

Updated at 10:10 a.m. Monday with Steward resignation and statement, Graham still on board:

Now the St. Louis area has just one representative on the University of Missouri Board of Curators. And all of the members are white

Following last week's resignation of Yvonne Sparks from St. Louis, David Steward of St. Louis County, a  founder of World Wide Technology, has also resigned from the board. Gov. Jay Nixon's office confirmed the news Monday, releasing this statement:

A 1963 photo of the Congress of Racial Equality demonstrating at the Jefferson Bank & Trust Company over the issue of jobs.
Arcadia Publishing

The author of a new book called “African American St. Louis” hopes images of the past will help people better understand the issues of today.

Lead author and educator John Wright Sr. grew up in St. Louis in the 1940s and '50s. His book, written in collaboration with his sons John Wright Jr. and Curtis Wright Sr., contains 170 color and black-and-white photos from the 1960s through the present.

Wright said many of the pictures are unique images you won’t see in museums, libraries, newspapers or online.

The largely deserted outside of the Comprehensive Behavioral Health building in East St. Louis
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio | file photo

Monday marks the start of Illinois’ eighth month without a budget. Most state departments and agencies are operating under a patchwork of court orders and legislation. But some state-funded social service programs haven’t received a dime since July.

According to a recent survey conducted by the United Way of Illinois, almost 90 percent of state-funded social service agencies in southern Illinois have had to cut services to clients during the budget impasse, including programs for teens, people who’ve experienced domestic violence, and people with disabilities.

U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, R-Kentucky, claimed that a third of Ferguson's budget was derived from civil fines. That statement is not true.
Flickr I ambientjohn

As voters in Iowa head off to caucus, a GOP presidential contender touched on the Ferguson unrest in the party's most recent debate. But U.S. Sen. Rand Paul's assertion about Ferguson's budgetary practices isn't lining up with the facts.

During last week’s GOP presidential debate, the Kentucky Republican senator was asked about expanding body cameras for police officers. Here's what Paul said:

police car lights
Jason Rojas | Flickr

A Kansas City-area Republican is sponsoring a bill that would set limits on when police camera footage is public record in Missouri.

The bill would block access to body camera recordings shot in homes, hospitals and schools unless the investigation is closed and someone in the video requests it.

(courtesy Monsanto)

On the same day the company paid out dividends to shareholders of 54 cents, Monsanto held its annual meeting.

Shareholders elected 13 members of the board of directors to one-year terms. They also approved the company’s executive compensation plan, ratified the hiring of accounting firm Deloitte and Touche, and approved the company’s performance goals.

Three shareowner proposals failed.

snebtor | Flickr

Owners of the best agricultural lands in Missouri will not see their taxes going up in 2017 and 2018.

The Missouri House and Senate have both passed a measure blocking a 5 percent tax hike on lands graded "1 through 4." That amounts to one-third of the state's most productive farmlands. The increase was authorized in December by the State Tax Commission and would have automatically taken effect without legislative action to stop it.

The Ferris Wheel moving to Branson from Chicago
Terence Faircloth | Flickr

It’s not a hoax—Chicago’s Navy Pier Ferris wheel is moving to Branson. The Track Family Fun Parks is paying $2.5 million to install the wheel in the Ozarks tourist town.

Known for its go-carts and bumper boats, CEO Craig Wescott said The Track had been thinking of adding a Ferris wheel for some time, and jumped on the opportunity to buy the Navy Pier wheel.

Rev. Osagyefo Sekou performs at a listening party for “The Revolution Has Come” on January 26, 2016. The album will be released January 31, 2016.
Carolina Hidalgo | St. Louis Public Radio

Inspired by the Rev. Osagyefo Uhuru Sekou’s forthcoming album “The Revolution Has Come,” we decided to look around St. Louis to find other interpretations of gospel music in the region. 

St. Louis has a rich tradition of gospel music, and our inquiry brought us to some unconventional interpretations. But let's start with what prompted this edition of Audio Agitation.

Updated 2:30 p.m.,  Jan. 29, to include court hearing information - Several property owners were in St. Louis Circuit Court Friday regarding land they own within a proposed site for a federal spy agency.

The city of St. Louis has been able to reach agreement with owners for nearly all the land it needs for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. But for 31 parcels, there’s still no resolution and the city has taken those property owners to court in condemnation proceedings.

.bobby | Flickr

In our weekly "Behind the Headlines" segment, “St. Louis on the Air” host Don Marsh discussed several of the top news stories that caught St. Louisans’ attention this week, with the people that produced them and influenced them. 

Here’s what we talked about, including:

A selection of posters from the nominees for a 2015 St. Louis Theater Circle Award.
Kelly Moffitt | St. Louis Public Radio

The St. Louis Theater Circle released its 2015 award nominees on Friday. The productions leading the nominations were Stages St. Louis’ production of “Anything Goes,” with nine nominations, and Stray Dog Theatre’s “The Mystery of Edwin Drood,” with seven nominations. The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis led all companies with 30 nominations.

In all, 21 companies were nominated in the fourth year of the awards, judged by 15 local theatre critics. All professional St. Louis productions are eligible; touring shows are not.

Andwele Jolly best donut
Willis Ryder Arnold | St. Louis Public Radio

Andwele Jolly is a trained physical therapist, an administrator at Washington University’s School of Medicine and an all-around doughnut connoisseur. In high school he could eat 12 doughnuts in a sitting. (Good thing that he ran track at the time.) Jolly has lived on two continents and in numerous states and has sampled doughnuts throughout the land. He says St. Louis’ love for the deep-fried delicacy stands out.

Students from Jefferson elementary schools cheer for the Normandy school board Thursday night, Jan. 28, 2016
Dale Singer | St. Louis Public Radio

On an evening when students in the Normandy Schools Collaborative expressed appreciation for their appointed board, the board voted to try to get more active involvement from the community at large.

Members of the Joint Executive Governing Board voted unanimously Thursday night to set up a community engagement group designed to help set long-term goals for the unaccredited district.

Ferguson resident Emily Davis waits to speak at a 2015 Ferguson City Council meeting. Davis is part of the Ferguson Collaborative, a group that's been following the consent decree process closely.
Jason Rosenbaum | St. Louis Public Radio

For Emily Davis, the future of Ferguson will come down to attitude.

Davis is part of the Ferguson Collaborative, a group of people who live, work and pray in the beleaguered St. Louis County municipality. Davis has been closely watching Ferguson and the debate over a consent decree with the Department of Justice, which came into public view on Wednesday after a 131-page document was released to the public. 

St. Louis County Police Chief Jon Belmar speaks with Special Agent in Charge James Shroba before the DEA news conference announcing the federal agency's new, more comprehensive strategy on Thurs. Jan. 28, 2016.
Camille Phillips | St. Louis Public Radio

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration is rolling out a new, more comprehensive approach to fighting drug trafficking, starting in St. Louis and three other cities.

According to the Special Agent in Charge of the DEA’s St. Louis division, St. Louis was chosen as a pilot for the agency’s “360 Strategy” because of the region’s high rate of violent crime and drug overdoses.

Marshall Griffin | St. Louis Public Radio

A Missouri Senate committee has passed a revised version of a bill that would eliminate the earnings tax in St. Louis.

This version of SB 575 would phase out the earnings tax in St. Louis over a 10-year period but would allow Kansas City to keep its earnings tax.

A rendering of the proposed riverfront stadium
Courtesy of HOK

Two more ethics bills are headed to the Missouri Senate after passing through the House today. That makes six that have gone on to the Senate. 

These are both sponsored by Rep. Jay Barnes, R-Jefferson City, and fit into a stated legislative goal of improving government oversight and accountability.

Saint Louis Science Center

A new interactive exhibit is opening at the Saint Louis Science Center called “Above and Beyond.” It explores the science of flight and what innovations are happening today that are shaping the future of aerospace.

Pages