News

Show-Me Cannabis hopes to collect enough signatures to put a measure to legalize marijuana on the 2016 Missouri statewide ballot.
(via Flickr/peter.a photography)

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon is pardoning five people for non-violent offenses, some of them committed decades ago.  One of those pardoned was convicted for stealing $1.46.

But most of the attention that Nixon is receiving for Friday's announcement is focused on his decision to commute the life sentence of Jeffrey Mizanskey, who has become a major figure in the movement to decriminalize marijuana.

Alex Heuer

Independent filmmaker Bill Streeter joined “Cityscape” guest host Don Marsh to discuss “Lo-Fi Cherokee,” an outgrowth of his award winning music and culture web video series, “Lo-Fi Saint Louis.”

“Lo-Fi Cherokee” is a yearly celebration of the St. Louis music scene featuring 18 live performance videos all produced in a single day in 18 different locations on Cherokee Street. The bands range from veteran national acts to up-and-coming local musical groups.

Alex Heuer

Shakespeare Festival St. Louis returns to Forest Park with the rarely performed “Antony and Cleopatra. Members of the company joined “Cityscape” guest host Don Marsh to discuss the production.

“Antony and Cleopatra” chronicles the love life of Mark Antony, one of three rulers of the Roman Empire, and Cleopatra, the Queen of Egypt, following the assassination of Julius Caesar.

Shirine Babb, an actor who plays the role of Cleopatra, said that in order to prepare for the role, she watched documentaries and read books about Cleopatra.

Flares at the Bridgeton Landfill are used to burn off smelly underground gases.
Véronique LaCapra | St. Louis Public Radio

The owners of the Bridgeton Landfill are facing fines from the Missouri Department of Natural Resources over noncompliance with emissions monitoring requirements.

According to a letter from Leanne Mosby, the DNR’s division director, Bridgeton Landfill LLC will be penalized up to $10,000 per violation, per day until the company resolves the issues. According to the letter the company:

he Chinese Lantern Festival opens at the Missouri Botanical Garden on May 23.
Stephanie Lecci / St. Louis Public Radio

A popular attraction that debuted in St. Louis a few years ago has returned. 

 

On Saturday night, the Missouri Botanical Garden will present the grand opening of Lantern Festival: Magic Reimagined, a display of 22 sets of Chinese lanterns constructed out of steel and silk and illuminated from the inside. 

 

 

Charles Ramsey, Philadelphia police commissioner and leader of President Obama's Task Force on 21st Century Policing
Provided by the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department

St. Louis Metropolitan Police officers, their families and supporters gathered in downtown St. Louis Friday morning to remember colleagues who have been killed in the line of duty.

One hundred sixty four officers from the department have been killed since 1863. The last name to be added to the list was in 2011, when Darryl Hall was killed while responding to a fight at a nightclub while he was off-duty.

Courtesy Circus Flora

By our internal clocks, if not by the solstice, Memorial Day weekend marks the beginning of summer. With concerns that run deeper than usual, many St. Louisans are wondering what kind of summer it will be. This week offers some clues.

Shaun Thomas, working on wood with acrylic paint markers, in front of student-made masks, which will also be on display
Edo Rosenblith

Many kids with severe autism can’t speak their minds. But when they communicate their thoughts and feelings through paint, paper mache, tin foil and beads, it can be a work of art.

Art by kids with autism is on display through June 6 at Cherokee Street’s beverly gallery, in a show called "Double Rainbow." The artists are students of Giant Steps, a private school for children, teenagers and young adults up to 21, who have autism.

Looking for the estranged husband. (Digital print, 2015) Sarah-Marie Land
Sarah-Marie Land

Artist Sarah-Marie Land is working to bridge the gap between the banality of daily life and the sometimes disturbing events that take place around us.  

“It’s important for individuals to see a different documentation of crime in our city. It really helps you think about your environment differently,” said Land. 

One of the studies suggests many Missouri women might be choosing between keeping their jobs and caring for family members.
Courtesy of GSCSNJ | Flickr

Two new reports on women's political participation and representation and work-family supports for women are giving Missouri middling rankings.

The studies are part of a larger series by the nonprofit Institute for Women's Policy Research on the "Status of Women in the States."

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