St. Louis Public Radio News
12:20 pm
Mon June 14, 2004

SIUE Dorms All Full for This Fall

(KWMU file photo)

Edwardsville, Ill. – Some procrastinating students at SIU-Edwardsville might find themselves without a place to live this fall.

Officials say the campus's residence halls are already full and more than 200 students are on the waiting list for a spot in the dorms.

The number of students living on the Edwardsville campus has increased by 22% over the past decade. Last fall, more than
13,000 students lived in campus housing.

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St. Louis Public Radio News
11:11 am
Mon June 14, 2004

St. Louis Schools Will Get Part Two of Audit Tonight

St. Louis Schools headquarters (KWMU photo)

St. Louis, MO – Missouri State Auditor Claire McCaskill will release the second half of a two-part audit of the St. Louis Public Schools tonight (Monday).

Part one of the audit released last February confirmed the findings of the district interim management team, that the St. Louis Public Schools would amass a projected $73 million operating deficit by June 30 if no budgetary cuts were made.

That report also found the unbalanced budget the school board approved in August 2003 violated state law.

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St. Louis Public Radio News
10:29 am
Mon June 14, 2004

SNAP Wants This Week's Bishops' Meeting Open

St. Louis, MO – The priest sex abuse victims' group, Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, is calling on U.S. Roman Catholic bishops to open their closed-door summit in Colorado this week.

The Conference of Catholic Bishops is holding what it calls a spiritual assembly in Denver starting today (Monday) which is not open to the public or the media.

But David Clohessy of St. Louis, the head of the victims group SNAP, says at the very least the discussion of the clergy sex abuse crisis, should be made public.

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St. Louis Public Radio News
9:57 am
Mon June 14, 2004

Holden Spokeswoman Says Reagan Day Cost Only $1 Million

St. Louis – A spokeswoman for Missouri Governor Bob Holden says the day of mourning for President Reagan did not cost the state as much as people think.

Reports last week said Friday's closing of state government in Missouri cost about $10 million.

That figure included overtime costs for employees of prisons, mental hospitals, and other state institutions that need 24-hour staffing, plus the paid day off other state employees got.

But Holden spokeswoman Mary Still says $10 million is an exaggeration.

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St. Louis Public Radio News
2:10 pm
Sun June 13, 2004

85 People Become Citizens at Old Courthouse

Sanaa Odah from Iraq, takes the Oath of Allegiance to become a United States citizen during a special Flag Day naturalization ceremony at the Old Courthouse. (UPI Photo/Bill Grenblatt)

St . Louis, MO – Some 85 people became American citizens Monday at a ceremony at the Old Courthouse in downtown St. Louis.

In the courthouse rotunda, replete with draped flags and bunting in honor of Flag Day, a diverse group from 35 countries pledged their citizenship to the United States.

Joseph Mua came to America from Cameroon. "I wanted to enjoy the land of milk and honey, which is better from where I came," he said. "Things are certainly better here; for example, education and to be able to do self-improvement."

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St. Louis Public Radio News
4:35 pm
Fri June 11, 2004

St. Louisans Pay Respects to President Reagan

St. Louis County police officers stand at attention Friday during a memorial service for former President Ronald Reagan.
(KWMU staff)

St. Louis – St. Louisans said their final farewell to former president Ronald Reagan Friday during two ceremonies in the region.

In Clayton, community leaders remembered Reagan as a man of commitment who had a vision of peace in the world.

Afterwards, Missouri state senator John Loudon, a Ballwin Republican, credited Reagan as being instrumental to the downfall of Soviet communism.

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St. Louis Public Radio News
4:30 pm
Fri June 11, 2004

The Osage, 200 Years After Lewis & Clark

This mural depicts the orgins of the Osage tribe. (KWMU photo)

Osage County, Oklahoma –

Since launching near St. Louis last month, the Lewis and Clark commemorative flotilla has traveled more than 200 miles up the Missouri River. Like the original expedition, the band of re-enactors is traveling through lands that were once home to the Osage Indians.

The Osage was the most prominent tribe in Missouri 200 years ago. But the Louisiana Purchase marked the beginning of the end for the Osage's traditional lifestyle.

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St. Louis Public Radio News
4:11 pm
Fri June 11, 2004

EPA, Airport Officials Agree on Asbestos Removal

St. Louis – Demolition workers clearing the way for Lambert Airport's new runway have agreed to stop using a controversial asbestos removal process.

Workers had been using what's known as the wet method, where a building is sprayed with water while it's being torn down in order to contain asbestos fibers.

But the EPA said Friday all wet method demolition will stop while officials review the process.

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St. Louis Public Radio News
3:41 pm
Fri June 11, 2004

P-D: Glitch Means Double Billing for Some MSD Customers

St. Louis, MO – The Post-Dispatch reports this (Fri.) morning some Metropolitan Sewer District customers have paid their water bills twice or even three times because of a computer glitch.

An agency spokesman says the problem started when a new company took over billing.

Alliance Data Systems, of Dallas, took payments out of people's checking accounts last month, just days after the payments had already been deducted. Then, after it put the money back, it charged customers again for the same payment period.

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St. Louis Public Radio News
2:11 pm
Fri June 11, 2004

Danforth Calls Reagan 'A Child of Light'

St. Louis – The Reverend John Danforth eulogized former President Ronald Reagan Friday as a "child of light."

The former Missouri Senator and Episcopal priest presided over Mr. Reagan's state funeral in Washington.

He said Puritan theologian John Winthrop's idea of America as a shining city on a hill became a central theme of the Reagan presidency.

"The Winthrop message became the Reagan message," Danforth said. "It rang of optimism, and we longed to hear it, especially after the dark years of Vietnam and Watergate."

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