Alzheimer's Disease
5:35 pm
Wed October 10, 2012

Study To Test Drugs Aimed At Preventing Alzheimer’s Dementia

The areas where the most Alzheimer’s plaques typically form are highlighted in red and yellow on these brain scans.
Tammie Benzinger, MD, PhD, Tyler Blazey/Washington University

Washington University will soon lead a clinical trial aimed at preventing people with Alzheimer’s disease from developing dementia.

The international trial will involve 160 patients in the U.S., Europe, and Australia who have a very rare, inherited form of Alzheimer’s, which typically causes dementia before age 50.

Washington University neurologist and study lead Dr. Randall Bateman says this is one of the first clinical trials to try to treat Alzheimer’s patients before they have any symptoms.

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Barbara Bradley Hagerty is the religion correspondent for NPR, reporting on the intersection of faith and politics, law, science and culture. Her New York Times best-selling book, "Fingerprints of God: The Search for the Science of Spirituality," was published by Riverhead/Penguin Group in May 2009. Among others, Barb has received the American Women in Radio and Television Award, the Headliners Award and the Religion Newswriters Association Award for radio reporting.

Jeff Lunden is a freelance arts reporter and producer whose stories have been heard on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition, as well as on other public radio programs.

Politics
3:33 pm
Wed October 10, 2012

In Wake Of New Ads, Akin Calls On McCaskill To Release Husband's Tax Returns

(via Claire McCaskill website/YouTube)

Democratic Senator Claire McCaskill released a trio of new campaign ads Wednesday that feature rape survivors discussing their opposition to her Republican opponent, Todd Akin.

The ads are grim and without music. They feature three sexual assault survivors, some of whom say they are Republican and pro-life, condemning Akin's stance on emergency contraception.

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St. Louis on the Air
3:01 pm
Wed October 10, 2012

Clayton, Missouri: Celebrating 100 Years

Downtown Clayton, Missouri
Mark Scott Abeln
  • Interview with Mary Delach Leonard

In April 2013, Clayton, Missouri will celebrate 100 years as a municipality.  Host Don Marsh talks with author Mary Delach Leonard, who also writes for the St. Louis Beacon, about her new book, Clayton, Missouri: An Urban Story. Leonard traces the beginning of the community from a rural outpost to a progressive metropolitan hub.  Mary Delach Leonard also highlights important city leaders who shaped Clayton and includes historic and contemporary photos of the community.

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Missouri Public Defenders
2:34 pm
Wed October 10, 2012

State Audit Released On Mo. Public Defenders

An audit of the Missouri Public Defender system recommends they better track the time they spend on cases and use different standards to decide proper caseloads.
(via Flickr/steakpinball)

The Missouri state auditor released a report Wednesday on the state’s Public Defender system.

Among the findings: public defenders need to better track the hours they spend on each case and update the standards they use to determine what’s the appropriate caseload.

Auditor Tom Schweich says Public Defenders have relied on national standards that are out-of-date.

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Robert Krulwich works on radio, podcasts, video, the blogosphere. He has been called "the most inventive network reporter in television" by TV Guide.

Krulwich is a Science Correspondent for NPR. His NPR blog, "Krulwich Wonders" features drawings, cartoons and videos that illustrate hard-to-see concepts in science.

He is the co-host of Radiolab, a nationally distributed radio/podcast series that explores new developments in science for people who are curious but not usually drawn to science shows. "There's nothing like it on the radio," says Ira Glass of This American Life, "It's a act of crazy genius." Radiolab won a Peabody Award in 2011.

St. Louis on the Air
11:09 am
Wed October 10, 2012

Health Disparities Among LGBT Missourians

Missouri Foundation for Health recent study about health disparities in the LGBT community
(via Missouri Foundation for Health)
  • Interview with Ryan Barker and A.J. Bockelman

A recently released report shows there is a disparity in health care among lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Missourians.  The study by the Missouri Foundation for Health shows LGBT individuals have less access to health care and tend to be less healthy than the general population.

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Michel Martin is curious about many things. "I wonder what it's like to leave everything and everyone you know for the promise of a better life, to run for President, to be a professional athlete, to parent children of a different race," she notes. "I am fascinated by people who live lives different from my own. And at the same time, I feel connected to all of these lives being a journalist, a woman of color, a wife and mother."

All these topics — from immigration to parenting in a multicultural family — are part of Tell Me More, the one-hour daily NPR news and talk show that made its national premiere on April 30, 2007, on public radio stations around the country.

Wrongful Death Suit
7:43 am
Wed October 10, 2012

Judge Denies Deposition Request in Martin Wrongful Death Hearing

Adrienne Martin (Bill Greenblatt/UPI)
(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

Jacob McCleland contributed reporting from Cape Girardeau.

A Cape Girardeau judge denied a deposition request on Tuesday in the wrongful death hearing of Adrienne Martin, the 27-year-old woman who died of a drug overdose in August Busch IV’s mansion in 2010.

Martin’s mother, Christine Trampler, requested depositions of Busch and three others.  But Judge William Syler denied her request because it would further drag out the year-and-a-half old case.

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