Race for the U.S. Senate
7:57 am
Tue October 2, 2012

Akin Goes on Offensive

(Akin: UPI Bill Greenblatt/McCaskill: Flickr/SenatorMcCaskill)

Republican challenger Todd Akin is going on the offensive against Missouri Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill by claiming her husband's businesses profited from the federal stimulus act.
 
 Akin began running a TV ad Monday claiming "the stimulus made McCaskill rich." In an interview with The Associated Press, Akin noted that the 2009 stimulus law funded a federal program for low-income housing that directed about $1 million to corporations affiliated with McCaskill's husband.
 

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Charter Communications
7:31 am
Tue October 2, 2012

Charter Offices Move To East Coast

Charter Communications provides video, high-speed Internet and telephone services to approximately 5.2 million customers in the U.S.
(via Wikimedia Commons)

Updated Tuesday, Oct. 2 at 10:20 p.m. with comments from St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley

Charter Communications announced Tuesday that it will move its corporate headquarters from Town and Country to Stamford, Connecticut. 

The move was motivated by a financial incentive package from Connecticut that could total up to $8.5 million by 2016. 

The details of the financial package were released at a press conference in Stamford Tuesday afternoon.

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Geraldo Rivera of the Fox News Channel once described David Folkenflik as "a really weak-kneed, backstabbing, sweaty-palmed reporter." Others have been kinder. The Columbia Journalism Review, for example, gave him a "laurel" for his reporting that immediately led the U.S. military to institute safety measures for journalists in Baghdad.

As NPR's Miami correspondent, Greg Allen reports on the diverse issues and developments tied to the Southeast. He covers everything from breaking news to economic and political stories to arts and human interest features. He moved into this role in 2006, after four years as NPR's Midwest correspondent.

Joseph Shapiro is a NPR News Investigations correspondent.

In this role, Shapiro takes on long-term reporting projects and covers breaking news stories for NPR's news shows.

Shapiro's major investigative stories include his reports on the failure of colleges and universities to punish for on-campus sexual assaults; the inadequacy of civil rights laws designed to get the elderly and people with disabilities out of nursing homes, and the little-known profits involved in the production of medical products from donated human cadavers.

Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

In his reporting, Stein focuses on the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, the obesity epidemic, and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein served as The Washington Post's science editor and national health reporter for 16 years, editing and then covering stories nationally and internationally.

Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years at NPR's science desk. Before that, he served as a science reporter for United Press International in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Martin Kaste is a correspondent on NPR's National desk. He covers the news throughout the Northwest, with an emphasis on technology and privacy stories.

In addition to general assignment reporting throughout the region, Kaste has contributed to NPR News coverage of major world events, including the 2010 earthquake in Haiti and the 2011 uprising in Libya.

Focusing on technology and privacy issues, Kaste has reported on the government's wireless wiretapping practices as well as the data-collection and analysis that goes on behind the scenes in social media and other new media. His privacy reporting was cited in a US Supreme Court opinion concerning GPS tracking.

Metro Transit
6:17 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Metro Starts Rolling Out New Fare Boxes Today

Pasa47 Flickr

Some Metro Transit riders saw new fare boxes as they boarded buses today.

The agency is testing the new fare boxes, which look a little like vending machines, on 40 of its buses.

The new fare boxes don’t allow customers to drop all of their money into the machines at the same time, and Metro Transit spokeswoman Dianne Williams said that change has been the source of most early complaints.

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lobbyists' gifts
5:42 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Mo. Sen. Candidate Wants Ban On All Lobbyist Gifts To State Lawmakers

Mo. Capitol
Marshall Griffin/St. Louis Public Radio

A Democratic candidate for the Missouri Senate is calling for a ban on all gifts from lobbyists to state lawmakers, and accusing his opponent of accepting more gifts and free meals over the past decade than any other Missouri legislator.

Scott Sifton (D, Affton) is a member of the Missouri House and is trying to unseat incumbent State Senator Jim Lembke (R, Lemay) in the 1st Senate District that covers most of South County.  Sifton accuses Lembke of accepting 560 gifts over the past 10 years.

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International Correspondent Anthony Kuhn official base is Jakarta, Indonesia, where he opened NPR's first bureau in that country in 2010. From there, he has covered Southeast Asia, and the gamut of natural and human diversity stretching from Myanmar to Fiji and Vietnam to Tasmania. During 2013-2014, he is covering Beijing, China, as NPR's Louisa Lim is on fellowship.

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