This American Life

The radio show and TV show follow the same format. There's a theme to each episode, and a variety of stories on that theme. It's mostly true stories of everyday people, though not always. There's lots more to the show, but it's sort of hard to describe. What is This American Life? It's "like movies for radio."

>> Visit the This American Life website for more detailed program information.

Scott Simon is one of America's most admired writers and broadcasters. He has reported from all fifty states, five continents, and ten wars, from El Salvador to Sarajevo to Afghanistan and Iraq. His books have chronicled character and characters, in war and peace, sports and art, tragedy and comedy.

Weekend Edition

The program wraps up the week's news and offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories.

>> Visit the Weekend Edition Saturday or Weekend Edition Sunday websites for more detailed program information.

The Tavis Smiley Show

A high-energy exchange of views, information, and insight hosted by Tavis Smiley. The one-hour weekly show offers a unique blend of news and newsmakers in expanded conversations, along with feature reports and regular commentators Cornel West, Connie Rice, Deroy Murdock, Omar Wasow, Kimberle Williams Crenshaw, Rachael Ross, Kathryn Lopez, Antonio Gonzalez, Jonathan Walton and George Johnson. Each weekend Tavis engages commentators and guests in substantive and provocative discussions on a wide range of topics including: politics, health, finance, sports, technology and pop culture. An insightful exploration of the issues that matter from fresh, diverse points of view is the show’s hallmark.

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360

Public radio’s smart and surprising guide to what's happening in pop culture and the arts.

Car Talk

Imagine the Marx Brothers answering questions about automobiles. Picture Monty Python trying to imitate car noises. Think of A.J. Foyt telling someone how to open the car hood. Mix it all up, throw in a little Dr. Ruth and a little Smothers Brothers, and you've got Car Talk, NPR's Peabody Award-winning radio program heard by more than 4 million listeners each week.

>> Visit the Car Talk website for more detailed program information.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!

Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! is NPR's weekly hour-long quiz program. Each week on the radio you can test your knowledge against some of the best and brightest in the news and entertainment world while figuring out what's real news and what's made up. On the Web, you can play along too.

>> Visit the Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me! website for more detailed program information.

BBC World Service

Programmes for radio, television, online and mobile phones in English and 27 other languages.

>> Visit the BBC World Service website for more detailed program information

Politics
6:02 pm
Fri September 28, 2012

Medicare: Hot Topic Between Enyart, Plummer

Bill Enyart speaks to senior citizens in East St. Louis.
(Chris McDaniel/St. Louis Public Radio)

Medicare has been a recurring topic of contention in the race for Illinois’ 12th Congressional district. Democratic candidate Bill Enyart introduced himself to senior citizens in East St. Louis to discuss his stance on the issue.

As this was the first time many of the senior citizens had ever seen Enyart, he took the time to link his name to a candidate that’s popular in the area.

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flying saucer opens
5:55 pm
Fri September 28, 2012

Starbucks Opens In 'Flying Saucer'

The newly-renovated 'Flying Saucer' building in Midtown now holds a Starbucks and is slated to hold a Chipotle restaurant.
(UPI/Bill Greenblatt)

A new Starbucks opened Friday in a Midtown St. Louis building often called the 'flying saucer.'

The modern building faced an uncertain future last year when Del Taco closed and the developer Rick Yackey wanted to tear it down.

Preservationists and even some politicians fought for the saucer, and Yackey changed his mind, instead luring national tenants.

St. Louis architectural historian Michael Allen says it was a big save.

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