Science
1:23 pm
Thu September 6, 2012

Drought fueling deer disease in Illinois, Midwest

A map depicting the distribution of EHD disease by Illinois county so far in 2012.
(via Illinois Department of Natural Resources)

The Illinois Department of Natural Resources says drought is fueling an outbreak of a fatal deer disease in southern and central Illinois and surrounding states.

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Developing: Jefferson County deaths
12:58 pm
Thu September 6, 2012

Officials: deaths in Jefferson County likely murder-suicide

Updated at 1 p.m. with information from Boyer's later press conference

The Jefferson County sheriff says although an investigation continues, evidence continues to mount that the deaths of a woman and her three children at a home in DeSoto, Mo. are a murder-suicide.

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Red-light cameras
11:08 am
Thu September 6, 2012

Appeals planned against red-light cameras in Missouri

Red light cameras at an intersection in Hazelwood, Mo.
(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

An appeal is planned after an eastern Missouri judge tossed out a lawsuit challenging the use of red-light cameras.

Jeff Brunner filed the suit last year against the city of Arnold and American Traffic Solutions, the Arizona firm that runs the city's red-light cameras. Brunner sued over a $94.50 fine for running a red light, arguing the cameras violate state law and are unconstitutional.

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Morning round-up
9:25 am
Thu September 6, 2012

Morning headlines: Thursday, September 6, 2012

(via Flickr/IndofunkSatish)

Criminal case against Kansas City Bishop to reach swift end today

The criminal case against the highest-ranking Catholic official in the U.S. to be charged with shielding an abusive priest is poised to reach a surprisingly fast end. Jackson County, Mo., prosecutors and attorneys for Kansas City Bishop Robert Finn have agreed to have a judge hear their case today, weeks ahead of a scheduled jury trial date.

Finn and the Catholic Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph are each charged with a misdemeanor count of failing to report suspected child abuse.

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Stormwater service
6:38 am
Thu September 6, 2012

When it comes to stormwater service, MSD is facing a perfect 'storm' of problems

Water whipping around the bend in Fishpot Creek carved this 25-foot cliff behind houses on Pepperdine Ct.
(photo courtesy of Ron Cox)

The remnants of Hurricane Isaac ended a summer-long dry spell. But for some customers of the Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District, it meant flooded backyards and basements.

For decades, MSD funded its stormwater service with a patchwork of different taxes, which allowed the agency to meet its regulatory requirements. But repairs were a different story.

Some parts of the region were flush with cash for capital projects. It took others months or years to accumulate enough funds for even basic repairs.

Earlier this year, a state appeals court struck down a potential solution - a fee based on how much water a property could absorb. An appeal to the state Supreme Court is pending.

For now, MSD has gone back to its old taxing districts - allowing the lingering problems to get worse.

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It's All Politics
6:29 am
Thu September 6, 2012

Five takeaways from Wednesday at the Democratic Convention

Former President Bill Clinton hugs President Obama onstage after Clinton's rousing speech during the Democratic National Convention on Wednesday in Charlotte, N.C.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 6, 2012 12:19 am

If you missed the second night of the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C., we live blogged it here.

But if you want a quick review, we've compiled five things that struck us about the night:

It's Not What You Say, It's How You Say It: In other hands, the very wonky speech that former President Clinton delivered on Wednesday could have been a snoozer.

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Health Care
5:43 am
Thu September 6, 2012

Show-Me Medicaid expansion? Missouri weighs the costs

Richard Freese sits in the waiting room of Family Care Health Centers in St. Louis. Freese is self-employed, servicing and selling industrial machines. But he says if he wound up hospitalized, he’d have no income – and no way to pay his bills.
(Veronique LaCapra/St. Louis Public Radio)

When the US Supreme Court upheld the federal health care law in June, it ruled that states couldn’t be penalized for failing to expand their Medicaid programs.

After the ruling, Missouri was one of a number of states that seemed ready to opt out of Medicaid expansion. Many in the Republican-led state legislature say expanding insurance coverage for low-income Missourians would cost too much.

But as St. Louis Public Radio’s Véronique LaCapra reports, without Medicaid expansion, Missouri’s working poor could be among those paying the biggest price.

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Loop Trolley Project
5:05 am
Thu September 6, 2012

Loop Trolley gets balance of $25M grant

Trolley car from the 1920s on the north lawn of the Missouri History Museum in Forest Park. This streetcar, along with an accompanying streetcar at Commerce Bank in the Loop, will be on display until the Loop Trolley system opens.
(Missouri History Museum)

The Loop Trolley project has received a boost of funding to help propel its construction process, according to the Missouri History Museum.

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Payday Loans
8:31 pm
Wed September 5, 2012

Activists protest to lower payday loan interest rates, raise the minimum wage

Justin Stein of Jobs with Justice leads protesters outside a payday loan shop on Grand Ave. on Wednesday, Sept. 5.
Tim Lloyd St. Louis Public Radio

Supporters of a failed effort to place initiatives on the November ballot in Missouri that would cap interest rates on payday loans and raise the minimum wage rallied in St. Louis today.

From priests to teenagers, around 100 people marched around a payday loan shop on Grand Ave.

Jamala Rogers is with Jobs for Justice and helped collect signatures for the ballot initiatives.

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Politics
6:49 pm
Wed September 5, 2012

Plummer points to levee uncertainty as cause of unemployment

Illinois congressional candidate Jason Plummer (at right).
(Chris McDaniel/Beyond November)

Illinois Congressional candidate Jason Plummer points to the uncertainty of the Metro East levee situation as a large cause of the area’s high unemployment rate. 

The Republican candidate says federal regulators are getting in the way of bipartisan work by local officials.  The Federal Emergency Management Agency alleges the area should be deemed a “hazard zone.” If that happens, the value of houses would reportedly plummet. Plummer said the number one complaint he hears is the lack of certainty.

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