St. Louis Symphony
11:42 am
Tue September 4, 2012

Live from London: St. Louis Symphony's Proms performance

Concertgoers lining up for the St. Louis Symphony performance at Royal Albert Hall on Sept. 4, 2012.
(via Adam Crane/St. Louis Symphony)

Today is the day our St. Louis Symphony performs at Royal Albert Hall in London - and you can listen right along, live. Here's how:

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Morning round-up
9:28 am
Tue September 4, 2012

Morning headlines: Tuesday, September 4, 2012

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Legal fight between Quinn and Union continues

The legal fight between Illinois Governor Pat Quinn and the union that represents prisons workers continues this week.

Quinn had wanted the prisons closed by last Friday. Instead that day an arbitrator said the administration violated its contract with the prison workers' union by moving to close the facilities before they'd finished what's called "impact bargaining."

Union spokesman Anders Lindall says impact bargaining doesn't only affect employees facing layoffs.

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Organic Agriculture
9:27 am
Tue September 4, 2012

Why Organic Food May Not Be Healthier For You

A shopper surveys the produce at Pacifica Farmers Market in Pacifica, Calif., in 2011.
AP

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 3:13 pm

Yes, organics is a $29 billion industry and still growing. Something is pulling us toward those organic veggies that are grown without synthetic pesticides or fertilizers.

But if you're thinking that organic produce will help you stay healthier, a new finding may come as a surprise. A new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine finds scant evidence of health benefits from organic foods.

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Dan Charles is NPR's food and agriculture correspondent.

Primarily responsible for covering farming and the food industry, Charles focuses on the stories of culture, business, and the science behind what arrives on your dinner plate.

This is his second time working for NPR; from 1993 to 1999, Charles was a technology correspondent at NPR. He returned in 2011.

Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News. Aubrey is a 2013 James Beard Foundation Awards nominee for her broadcast radio coverage of food and nutrition. And, along with her colleagues on The Salt, winner of a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. Her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's also host of the NPR video series Tiny Desk Kitchen.

Through her reporting Aubrey can focus on her curiosities about food and culture. She has investigated the nutritional, and taste, differences between grass fed and corn feed beef. Aubrey looked into the hype behind the claims of antioxidants in berries and the claim that honey is a cure-all for allergies.

Firefighter residency
4:00 pm
Mon September 3, 2012

St. Louis city, state will take residency law dispute to the Supreme Court

A dispute over a state law that allowed firefighters to leave St. Louis city after 7 years goes to the Supreme Court on Thursday.
(Rachel Lippmann/St. Louis Public Radio)

The state of Missouri and the city of St. Louis will go in front of the state Supreme Court on Thursday to argue over who can decide where city employees live.

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Weather
9:37 am
Mon September 3, 2012

Reminder from Ill. officials to stay prepared for storms

Flickr/Sky-y Photography

Illinois officials are reminding people to stay prepared for severe weather and disasters.

Morning round-up
9:26 am
Mon September 3, 2012

Morning headlines: Monday, Sept. 3, 2012

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Isaac dumps rain, but Mo. drought persists

The National Weather Service says large parts of rural Missouri and Illinois had between three-to-five inches of rainfall this weekend.

In St. Louis, Oakville received three and a half inches of rain, the most in the metropolitan area.  But National Weather Service Meteorologist Jayson Gosselin said it will take much more rain to snap this summer's historic drought.

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University of Missouri Press
9:24 am
Mon September 3, 2012

University of Missouri attempts to mend fences

The campus of the University of Missouri in Columbia, Mo.
Adam Procter Flickr

The University of Missouri is trying to mend fences with authors, while restoring the reputation and funding of its academic press.

The university announced plans in June to close the press, prompting outrage in the academic community. Some authors demanded their publishing rights returned. That decision was reversed Tuesday, when university officials said the press would continue to produce books and digital publications.

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Morning Round-Up
10:30 am
Sun September 2, 2012

Morning headlines: Sunday, September 2, 2012

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Faith leaders participate in “Labor in the Pulpits, on the Bimah, in the Minbar” 

This morning  faith leaders for more than 80 congregations across the state will deliver messages on the value of work and the need to raise the minimum wage. 

The event is being organized by Missouri Jobs with Justice, and is part of what it says is a campaign to pair religious leadership with labor advocates.

The group says it’s working to raise awareness about challenges facing minimum wage workers and the need to cap the interest rate on pay day loans.  

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