Severe Weather
5:20 pm
Sun April 1, 2012

New, ramped-up tornado warnings to start Monday

Joplin residents look through the remains of their house on May 24, 2011, two days after an EF-5 tornado devastated the city.
(UPI/Tom Uhlenbrock)

As of Monday, the National Weather Service will be issuing a new kind of tornado warning in Missouri and Kansas.

The new, more forceful and explicit messages are designed to get attention and drive people to take shelter during dangerous storms.

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St. Louis Symphony
5:10 pm
Sat March 31, 2012

St. Louis Symphony Extra - March 31, 2012

Powell Hall, home of the St. Louis Symphony.
(Alise O'Brien)

The St. Louis Symphony continues its 2011-2012 season this weekend, and you can be right there with them from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturday, March 31.

On select Saturday evenings, St. Louis Public Radio broadcasts the Symphony's performance over the air, bringing you a live classical music experience wherever you are.

Here's what's in store for you this weekend - a program highlighting the St. Louis Symphony Chorus:

BACH Mass in B minor 

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DAP list
3:44 pm
Fri March 30, 2012

Self-banned gamblers get chance to test their luck again

(via Flickr/sampsyo)

For the first time since it was implemented in 1996, gamblers in Missouri now have a way to remove themselves from the state's voluntary casino exclusion list.

The Missouri Gaming Commission today made forms available to start the removal from the "disassociated persons" list. Any gambler who's been on the list for five years is eligible.

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Record Heat
2:54 pm
Fri March 30, 2012

March was warmest on record in St. Louis - Illinois, too.

(via Flickr/Jack W. Reid)

March’s average temperature in St. Louis this year is almost 15 degrees above normal. If the forecast holds true tomorrow, St. Louis’s unusually high temperatures will make this the warmest March on record.

National Weather Service Meteorologist Mark Britt says the average temperature this month will be almost 61 degrees.

“The previous record of 1910 was only about 57.5 so that’s a considerable breaking of the record,” he said.  

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Conservation - Endangered Species
2:38 pm
Fri March 30, 2012

MOBOT scientists help rediscover two tree species thought to be extinct

The fruit and seeds of Erythrina schliebenii, a highly endangered East African coral tree.
(Frank Mbago/Missouri Botanical Garden)

Scientists at the Missouri Botanical Garden have confirmed the discovery of two tree species that were thought to be extinct.

Last year botanists from the University of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania set out to look for the trees. They discovered small populations of both species in a remote forest in southeastern Tanzania, along Africa’s eastern coast.

Missouri Botanical Garden botanist Roy Gereau worked with British scientist Phil Clarke to confirm the identity of the trees.

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Speeding
12:40 pm
Fri March 30, 2012

Lead foot? Ill. may get tougher on excessive speeding

(via Flickr/Viernest)

Illinois may get tougher on drivers who don't just break the speed limit but shatter it.

The state Senate voted Friday to deny the option of court supervision when drivers break the limit by certain amounts: over 25 mph on city streets and over 30 mph on highways.

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The Salt
11:47 am
Fri March 30, 2012

Feds to decide on banning BPA from food and other products

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Environmental groups say a ban would protect consumers from the health effects of BPA that leaches from products including some soup cans.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 30, 2012 4:26 pm

UPDATE 4:23 p.m.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has denied a call to ban the plastic additive BPA from food packaging. The action comes after government scientists found little reason to think people are being harmed by the chemical.

The FDA was responding to a petition from the Natural Resources Defense Council, which called for the ban on BPA, also known as bisphenol A, from any use where it comes in contact with food.

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Jon Hamilton is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk. Currently he focuses on neuroscience, health risks, and extreme weather.

Following the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, Hamilton was part of NPR's team of science reporters and editors who went to Japan to cover the crisis at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant.

Hamilton contributed several pieces to the Science Desk series "The Human Edge," which looked at what makes people the most versatile and powerful species on Earth. His reporting explained how humans use stories, how the highly evolved human brain is made from primitive parts, and what autism reveals about humans social brains.

The Two-Way
9:51 am
Fri March 30, 2012

Mega Millions Mania: What if you win? Then what do you do?

Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Fri March 30, 2012 11:27 am

Everybody, it seems, is talking about tonight's Mega Millions lottery drawing because the jackpot's up to a record $640 million. (Update at 12:15 p.m. ET: Officials just increased the estimated jackpot, which began today at an already record $540 million.)

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Morning round-up
9:37 am
Fri March 30, 2012

Morning headlines: Friday, March 30, 2012

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers breached the levee at Birds Point as part of the activation of the floodway May 2, 2011.
(via Flickr/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers)

Army Corps. seeks dismissal of lawsuit filed on behalf of southeast Mo. farmers

More than 140 southeast Missouri farmers are seeking damage caused by last year's intentional breach of the Birds Point levee at the height of spring flooding.

The Southeast Missourian reports that government attorneys filed a motion to dismiss the suit in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims. Oral arguments in the suit are scheduled to begin April 10 in Washington.

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