Energy efficiency plan
7:52 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Ameren Missouri discusses efficiency plan w/ Mo. PSC

Ameren’s 2,400-megawatt plant near Labadie, Mo. is the state’s largest coal-fired power plant.
(VĂ©ronique LaCapra, St. Louis Public Radio)

The Public Service Commission heard details Monday on Ameren Missouri’s proposed efficiency plan.

The proposal is designed to promote energy efficiency while still allowing the St. Louis-based utility to earn a profit.  It has an estimated price tag of $145 million and it would be paid by the utility’s customers, whose residential bills on average would be about $3 a month higher.  But Ameren Missouri’s Warren Wood says if approved, customers would save money in the long run.

Read more
Election 2012
5:48 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

Nixon adds $2.1 million to campaign chest

Mo. Gov. Jay Nixon in St. Louis on Jan. 24, 2011.

Gov. Jay Nixon’s re-election war chest continues to grow, according to new figures released today.

Nixon raised $2.1 million between April and June, and had over $7.6 million in his account as of July first.  His campaign calls it his strongest fundraising quarter this election cycle and says his bank account is twice the size it was around this time in July 2008.

The Democrat from DeSoto will face the winner of the August 7th Republican primary.

Read more
Urban Development
4:30 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

A Rust Belt dilemma: demolition or redevelopment

Taken in the 3rd Ward, north of the old Pruitt-Igoe housing project in St. Louis.
Adam Allington/St. Louis Public Radio

The City of St. Louis has some of the highest  home vacancy rates in the country, and last month the mayor of Detroit made news when he laid out ambitious plans to demolish as many as 10,000 vacant buildings by the end of his term.

With costs for maintenance and upkeep running in the tens of millions, many Rust Belt cities often find it expedient to simply demolish empty buildings in favor of vacant lots and the hope of future development.

But taking down problem properties creates a whole new set of issues which are often overlooked.

Read more
St. Louis Police
1:44 pm
Mon July 16, 2012

St. Louis police officer charged in burglary

If a vote on the latest proposal for temporary pay cuts passes at a East St. Louis Fraternal Order of Police meeting on Thursday, 16 police officers laid off Jan. 1 could be reinstated (via Flickr/davidsonscott15).

A six-year veteran of the St. Louis Police Department is suspended without pay after being charged with first-degree burglary.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that 29-year-old Andrew Perez was reportedly intoxicated when he unlawfully entered a home around 4 a.m. Sunday while off-duty. Perez allegedly thought the home he was entering was that of a friend.

Police say Perez left when the homeowner confronted him, but the homeowner called police.

Read more
Morning round-up
9:31 am
Mon July 16, 2012

Morning headlines: Monday, July 16, 2012

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Quinn to announce plan to address Illinois' drought

Gov. Pat Quinn plans  a visit to a southern Illinois farm today. The Illinois Farm Bureau says that so far, it's the sixth driest year on record. The average precipitation of the first half of the year was 12.6 inches. Much of Illinois' corn and soybean crop is suffering. Farm officials say southern Illinois is experiencing the worst of it.  Quinn is expected to detail whatever government relief may be available to drought-affected growers and ranchers.

Read more
Genetics - Cancer
6:43 am
Mon July 16, 2012

Unwinding the helix: using genetics to treat childhood cancer

Washington University’s Todd Druley uses a magnet to separate DNA-coated magnetic beads from a liquid reaction buffer, to isolate specific genes from patient DNA for sequencing analysis.
Scott Supplesa

Pediatric leukemia is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow. There are about 3,000 new cases in the United States every year, typically in children between the ages of four and six.

With treatment, about three-quarters of affected children are able to beat the disease.

But for those with what’s known as “high risk” leukemia, the odds of survival are much worse.

Washington University pediatric oncologist Dr. Todd Druley has been trying to use genetics to understand why some leukemia is so hard to treat. He spoke with St. Louis Public Radio's VĂ©ronique LaCapra.

Read more
Drought
2:44 pm
Sun July 15, 2012

No drought relief in sight

(via Flickr/KOMUnews/Malory Ensor)

Dry conditions are expected to get worse in the coming days, and it will take a whole lot more than scattered thunderstorms to break the drought. 

“We’re way, way, way below normal in rainfall,” National Weather Service Meteorologist Fred Glass said.  “Most of the area is in severe drought conditions, it’s going to quite a bit of rain to make that up, probably in many areas 8-12 inches, and in some areas in excess of 12 inches.”

Read more
Morning round-up
9:23 am
Sun July 15, 2012

Morning headlines: Sunday, July 15, 2012

(via Flickr/Indofunk Satish)

Some Missourians could soon have their criminal records expunged

Missourians could be able to get some criminal misdeeds expunged from their records.

Under newly approved state legislation, people could ask the courts to erase their criminal history after 10 years for a misdemeanor and after 20 years for a felony.

Those seeking to have criminal records expunged would need to have completed their prison terms, probation and parole. They also would need to have paid restitution and not have committed another crime.

Read more
Page-Olive Connector
1:33 pm
Sat July 14, 2012

Officials celebrate completion of Page-Olive Connector

Federal, state and local officials celebrated the completion of the relocated Route 141 project and the Page-Olive Connector on Saturday, July 14, 2012.
Tim Lloyd St. Louis Public Radio

A collection of federal, state and local officials celebrated the completion of the relocated Route 141 project and the Page-Olive Connector.   

The project’s completion opens up 24-miles of unimpeded traffic from Interstate 55 at the south to Highway 370 at the north.

Earlier today, joggers and bicyclists were allowed to leisurely peddle and jog down the stretch of new roadway before officially opening to traffic.

Read more
Missouri Elk
6:14 pm
Fri July 13, 2012

Elk herd "doing well" after first year in Missouri

In the fall, male elk bugle and fight to attract females. A bull can weigh as much as 1,100 pounds.

Missouri’s elk population appears to be settling into their new home state, according to state conservation officials.

Dr. Joseph Millspaugh of the University of Missouri -- Columbia updated the Missouri Conservation Commission today on the state’s elk herd, which he says seems to be doing well.

“(We have) evidence of survival rates (and) reproductive rates that are average to high," Millspaugh said.  "We see diet quality certainly within the range of what we would expect.”

Read more

Pages