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Health
10:29 am
Wed January 23, 2013

Culture, Politics Still Collide on Roe v. Wade's 40th

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 11:55 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Television
10:01 am
Wed January 23, 2013

Jimmy Kimmel: Making Late Night A Family Affair

Comedian Jimmy Kimmel interviews Mel Brooks on Jimmy Kimmel Live.
Randy Holmes ABC

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 11:04 am

This month, Jimmy Kimmel's late-night ABC talk show, Jimmy Kimmel Live, joins the 11:35 p.m. nightly lineup — which puts him in direct competition with two reining comedy kings: Jay Leno and Kimmel's idol, David Letterman.

Kimmel, who paid tribute to Letterman at the Kennedy Center Honors in December, didn't break the news to Letterman himself.

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Europe
6:05 am
Wed January 23, 2013

Wife's Phone Call Interupts Soccer News Conference

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 7:13 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. A Scottish sports reporter recorded a soccer team press conference using his phone. Great idea, but inevitably the reporter's phone rang. The soccer team manager picked it up.

(SOUNDBITE OF PRESS CONFERENCE)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Hello?

INSKEEP: It was the reporter's wife, who hung up in confusion, but then called again. And the manager answered again.

(SOUNDBITE OF PRESS CONFERENCE)

Around the Nation
5:58 am
Wed January 23, 2013

Young Journalist Discovers Experience Pays Off

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 7:13 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

Young Ethan Sattler started his own news organization last fall, a first step in being a real journalist. Then he put in a request to cover the inauguration from the White House Briefing Room, which was granted.

There were no briefings on Inauguration Day, but the 13-year-old did catch some of the action. He so impressed everyone, he landed a spot in the press viewing area; and caught a glimpse of the president leaving the White House.

NPR Story
4:14 am
Wed January 23, 2013

Netanyahu Must Turn Fractured Results Into A Government

Originally published on Sun January 27, 2013 8:17 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. In Israel last night a surprisingly close election. Voters appear to have reelected Prime Minister Netanyahu for another term. That was expected. But Netanyahu's right wing alliance suffered serious losses. Centrist and left wing parties defied opinion polls and won half the seats in parliament. As NPR's Larry Abramson reports from Jerusalem, the prime minister will now have to turn these fractured results into a government.

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NPR Story
4:14 am
Wed January 23, 2013

Nebraska Approves Keystone XL Pipeline's Tweaked Route

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 7:13 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with pipeline plans.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: Nebraska's governor has approved a new plan for where the controversial Keystone XL pipeline will pass through his state. In 2011, the governor opposed the pipeline for its potential environmental impact. Yesterday, he wrote a letter to President Obama saying the new route avoids the more environmentally fragile parts of Nebraska.

It now falls to the Obama administration to approve the project. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR Story
4:14 am
Wed January 23, 2013

Gen. John Allen Cleared In Email Probe

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 7:13 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

OK, the Pentagon says the U.S. commander in Afghanistan is cleared. Gen. John Allen was caught in a scandal last fall. You may recall, he'd been corresponding by email with a Florida socialite; and the question for the Pentagon was whether Gen. Allen's emails were inappropriate. NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman followed the story back then. He's with us now. Tom, good morning.

TOM BOWMAN, BYLINE: Good morning, Steve.

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Shots - Health News
2:39 am
Wed January 23, 2013

Rules Would Retire Most Research Chimps

Two chimps groom each other at the Save the Chimps facility in Florida. The National Institutes of Health owns about 360 chimpanzees that aren't yet retired and that are living at research facilities; new guidelines say most of its chimps should be retired.
Save the Chimps

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 2:56 pm

The National Institutes of Health should retire most of its chimps that are currently living in research facilities, according to a working group put together by the NIH to look at the future need for biomedical research on chimps.

The group did recommend keeping a small number of chimps in reserve in case they are needed for studies later on. But it also laid out a detailed description of the kind of living conditions that would be needed for those chimps, and said any proposed research should go through a review committee that includes members of the public.

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Around the Nation
2:36 am
Wed January 23, 2013

Schussing Down Slopes Can Snowball Into A Search-And-Rescue Bill

Some states can bill skiers for search-and-rescue efforts. Often, those who need rescuing wandered into out-of-bounds areas and couldn't find their way back.
Nina Keck Vermont Public Radio

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 8:02 am

Fresh snow lures a lot of people to do some outdoor exploring, but sometimes that exploring can go too far. When snowmobilers or skiers wander off or get in over their heads, many call 911, putting a strain on already underfunded search-and-rescue budgets.

In Vermont, state police have had to help find 50 lost skiers in the past four weeks.

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National Security
2:35 am
Wed January 23, 2013

Obama's Promise To Close Guantanamo Prison Falls Short

Demonstrators, dressed as detainees, march on Jan. 11 against the U.S. military detention facility in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and call for President Obama to close the facility.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 7:13 am

In one of his first acts as commander in chief, President Obama in 2009 signed an executive order to close the U.S. detention camp at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

It was part of a campaign promise the president made, to close the camp and "determine how to deal with those who have been held there." But four years on, the controversial prison remains open.

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