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Author Interviews
6:58 am
Sat May 17, 2014

Mark Twain's Famous Outcasts Float Through Three Centuries

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 10:29 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Author Interviews
6:58 am
Sat May 17, 2014

'Wynne's War,' A Modern Take On The Classic 'Mideastern'

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 10:29 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Aaron Gwyn has written a novel about modern man at war on horses. He calls it a mideastern. "Wynne's War" is the story of a U.S. Army Ranger from Okla., Elijah Russell, whose stellar horsemanship gets him assigned to train Green Berets for a special mission in Afghanistan, a horseback raid on the Taliban in treacherous mountain territory.

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Code Switch
5:42 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Federal Goverment Jeopardizes Navajo Family's Ties To Its Home

Navajo elder Stella Peshlakai Smith, 89, stands at a traditional dwelling on her homestead at Wupatki National Monument in 2014. The National Park Service says her children cannot stay when she dies.
Felicia Fonseca AP

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 9:46 am

At 89 years old, Stella Peshlakai Smith shuffles around her Arizona yard in white tennis shoes and a long traditional Navajo skirt. She points to her ceremonial home, called a hogan. "My father made this one [almost 100 years ago]," Smith says. Her modern house sits next door.

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This Week's Must Read
4:41 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

A 'New York Times' Shake-Up, But Not The One You're Thinking Of

Taxis speed past the headquarters of the New York Times.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon May 19, 2014 10:51 am

It's not all that often that the New York Times goes from printing the biggest stories of the day to actually being the biggest story of the day. But that's exactly what happened this week when the publisher, Arthur Sulzberger Jr. replaced Jill Abramson as the executive editor.

The Times has dealt with big problems before. I'm thinking of course about about Jayson Blair. Seth Mnookin's book, Hard News, is the definitive account of that saga. It's the story of an old line institution that allowed a snake to slip through unnoticed.

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The Two-Way
4:27 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Ancient Skeleton In Mexico Sheds Light On Americas Settlement

In this June 2013 photo provided by National Geographic, diver Susan Bird, working at the bottom of Hoyo Negro, a large dome-shaped underwater cave in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, brushes the Naia skull found at the site.
Paul Nicklen AP

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 7:00 pm

The nearly complete skeleton of a teenage girl who died some 12,000 to 13,000 years ago in a cave in the Yucatan Peninsula, has yielded DNA clues linking her to Native Americans living today.

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NPR Story
3:57 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

What's In A Name? Plenty Of Ways To Make A Mistake

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 7:00 pm

When Arizona State University graduates hear their names announced, they have Peter Lafford to thank. It's his job to ensure students' names are pronounced correctly — and it's not always an easy task.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

All Tech Considered
3:34 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

European Ruling On Removing Google Links May Leave A Mess

Legal experts say it's too soon to know the impact of a European court ruling that will require Google to remove some links upon request.
Virginia Mayo AP

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 7:31 pm

Google's lawyers are trying to make sense of a ruling they did not expect.

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NPR Story
3:23 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

U.K., France Compete For China's Tourists

People from China are considered the world’s top tourists. Studies show that on average they spend more money than people from other countries do.

This is a relatively new development because China’s economy has boomed and government restrictions on travel have been eased. The middle class now has money. They want to see the world and of course there are millions of them.

The BBC’s China correspondent Carrie Gracie reports on what Britain and France are doing to attract them.

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NPR Story
3:23 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

How A Quarrel In Panama Is Making Waves In Miami

Epic Endeavor: Building the Panama Canal's wider locks. (Panama Canal Authority)

The brand new PortMiami tunnel is set to open next week. It’s a billion dollar project that’s been in the works for more than four years. The tunnel will take trucks and cruise passenger traffic under Biscayne Bay, rather than through downtown Miami.

It’s the centerpiece of the $2 billion makeover of the Port of Miami, which was done largely so the city can capitalize on another major expansion going on more than 1,000 miles to the south: the widening of the Panama Canal, to accommodate bigger ships carrying more cargo.

But the Panama Canal project is now in limbo.

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NPR Story
3:23 pm
Fri May 16, 2014

Woman Organizes Against Police Killings In Brazil Ahead Of World Cup

Riot police stand near the Arena Corinthians stadium during a protest of the Workers Without a Roof Movement (MTST) against the upcoming FIFA World Cup Brazil 2014 in Sao Paulo on May 15, 2014. The Arena Corinthians will host the opening match of the FIFA World Cup Brazil 2014 on June 12, between Brazil and Croatia. (Nelson Almeida/AFP/Getty Images)

The World Cup kicks off in Brazil in less than a month, and preparations are still ongoing — three stadiums are still under construction.

Boston resident Liz Martin is worried that part of the preparations for the World Cup will include more violence by the police.

Amnesty International reports that Brazil’s police are responsible for about 2,000 deaths each year, one of the highest rates in the world.

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