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Remembrances
10:44 am
Tue October 23, 2012

Remembering Activist And Actor Russell Means

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And, finally today, we want to take a few moments to remember Native American activist and actor Russell Means. He died on Monday at his home in South Dakota. He had cancer. The Washington Post once called Means the quote, "biggest, baddest, meanest, angriest, most famous American Indian activist of the late 20th century," unquote. And that was an article describing a very different side of him. It was a review of his work in the animated Disney film "Pocahontas," where he was the voice of a Native American chief.

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Education
10:44 am
Tue October 23, 2012

Twitter "Saturday School" For Teachers

Every Saturday morning, nearly 200 educators join the online conversation #satchat. They say Twitter lets them instantly discuss issues like bullying, teacher recruitment and social media with colleagues outside their districts. Host Michel Martin talks with #satchat co-founder and New Jersey public school administrator Scott Rocco.

Children's Health
10:44 am
Tue October 23, 2012

Restraint And Seclusion: Discipline Gone Too Far?

At some schools, unruly children are physically restrained or isolated in so-called seclusion rooms. Critics like investigative journalist Bill Lichtenstein say the methods are often abusive and must stop. He wrote about his own daughter's experience in an opinion piece for The New York Times. He talks with host Michel Martin.

Presidential Race
10:44 am
Tue October 23, 2012

Debate Round 3: Split Decision Or Knock Out?

Originally published on Sun October 28, 2012 8:47 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, when you were in school, did you ever wonder how your teachers were spending their weekends? Well, these days some of them might be hanging out on Twitter talking about you. Or at least how to be a better teacher and other issues in education. It's called Sat Chat and we'll tell you more about it and we'll speak with the man behind it in just a few minutes.

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Economy
10:44 am
Tue October 23, 2012

Homeowners' Deductions: Economic Boost Or Burden?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now to matters of personal finance. As we head to the last lap of the election, you might be getting familiar by now with some of the issues being talked about over and over again by the candidates.

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Strange News
4:53 am
Tue October 23, 2012

A Captive Beluga Whale's Remarkably Human Song

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with a tale of the singing whale. Scientists this week published a study of a captive beluga whale in San Diego. The whale began to sing, apparently after spending time close to people. It died several years ago, but left behind a recording that sounds like a person in the shower.

(SOUNDBITE OF WHALE SINGING)

INSKEEP: We do not know if during his lifetime the singing whale ever made it to a karaoke bar.

Strange News
4:53 am
Tue October 23, 2012

Bridge Designers Envision Giant Trampolines

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Asia
3:58 am
Tue October 23, 2012

Malala Isn't Alone: Another Pakistani Girl's Dream

Pakistani security personnel stand guard in front of a burnt-out school following an attack by the Pakistani Taliban in the northwestern district of Upper Dir in June 2011. The Taliban have destroyed many schools in northwestern Pakistan.
AFP Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 7:18 pm

Stop someone in the street. Ask them about the case of Malala Yousafzai. They will likely know — after the worldwide publicity given to her story — that Malala is the Pakistani teenager who was shot for demanding the right of girls to go to school.

They will surely know, too, that the people who shot Malala in the head from close range were the Pakistani Taliban. They will probably view Malala as the heroine she clearly is. And the Taliban will be seen as the violent fanatics that they surely are.

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Author Interviews
3:38 am
Tue October 23, 2012

Running Toward Redemption On 'Ransom Road'

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 4:53 am

Meet a man with a powerful addiction — to running. Caleb Daniloff says he believes the sport saved him from addictions that were far worse, and he's written a new book, called Running Ransom Road: Confronting the Past, One Marathon at a Time, about his experiences.

Daniloff has run some familiar marathons — New York and Boston — but he's also been to a place not famous for outdoor running: Moscow.

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All Tech Considered
3:38 am
Tue October 23, 2012

Microsoft, An Empire Under Siege, Makes Its Next Moves

Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer speaks at a Microsoft event in San Francisco in July. This week, Microsoft launches Windows 8, a radical redesign of its operating system, as well as a new set of tablet computers.
Jeff Chiu AP

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 5:49 pm

Microsoft, the company that defined the PC, is still enormously profitable — but not as profitable as it once was.

This week, Microsoft will try to regroup. It is rolling out the largest upgrade of its Windows software in more than a decade. All of this is meant to help the company break into the exploding market for mobile.

While the company still commands a formidable computing empire, it is now under attack.

Microsoft's CEO is Steve Ballmer, a big, bombastic, balding guy. These days he's riled up about Windows 8.

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