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Around the Nation
4:04 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

The Difficult Choices Behind Bringing Sept. 11 Museum To Life

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 7:18 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm joined now by the director of the 9/11 Memorial Museum, Alice Greenwald. Welcome to the program.

ALICE GREENWALD: Hello, Melissa.

BLOCK: How do you see the role and the purpose of this museum, because as the name indicates, it is both a museum and a memorial, and I would think there might be a tension really between those two missions?

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U.S.
4:01 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

When States Can't Control Violent Youth, Is Prison The Answer?

Protesters rally outside the Department of Children and Families in Hartford, Conn., in April. The state's decision to send a transgender teen to adult prison has galvanized juvenile justice and LGBT advocates.
Lucy Nalpathanchil WNPR

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 7:18 pm

More than 4,000 children are in the custody of Connecticut's Department of Children and Families. But it's one girl, known as Jane Doe, who has galvanized advocates for juvenile justice reform and LGBT youth.

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The Impact of War
3:38 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

On Hill, VA Chief Shinseki Faces Hospital Death Allegations

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 7:18 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Veteran Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki faced tough questions from senators today. They wanted to know about allegations that VA clinics are cooking the books claiming they see patients within 14 days, when in reality veterans can wait months for an appointment. And there was something else senators raised with the secretary: Whether he should take responsibility for the troubles and resign. Here's NPR's Quil Lawrence.

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Around the Nation
3:17 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

Online Gambling In The Garden State Gets Off To A Slow Start

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 7:18 pm

Jason Schlachter has been gambling for a living since college, mostly online, and he makes lots of money doing it. The trouble is, New Jersey — where he does his gambling — isn't having the same success. The state legalized online gambling in 2013, expecting a $160 million windfall in tax revenue, but it has earned less than $8 million so far. WNYC's Jessica Gould looks at what's gone wrong with New Jersey's big bet.

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Africa
3:05 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

The Possibilities And Pitfalls Of The U.S.-Nigeria Team Search

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 7:18 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

There are questions not just about Nigeria's military capability but also about that government's commitment to bringing the girls home. Earlier today, I spoke with Sarah Sewell. She's the undersecretary of state for civilian security, democracy and human rights. She's just returned from Nigeria, where she met with senior government officials. They discussed efforts to find the kidnapped girls and, longer-term, how to combat violent extremism. I asked her to describe the tone of those meetings.

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NPR Story
2:31 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

TV 'Upfronts' Preview Next Season's Shows

Fox's "Gotham" is among the new shows airing this fall. (Fox)

This week, big TV broadcast networks released their fall schedules at an event in New York City.

The “upfronts,” as the event is called in the industry, draws in a huge crowd of advertisers, media executives, actors, agents and producers. It also serves as a chance for big networks to woo over advertisers.

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NPR Story
2:31 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

FCC Vote Could Open Internet Fast Lanes

People demonstrate for net neutrality in the neighborhood of Bel-Air outside a USC Shoah Foundation fundraiser to be attended by President Barack Obama on May 7, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. (David McNew/Getty Images)

With a three-to-two vote today, the FCC released a controversial set of proposed rules on Internet openness.

A leaked draft version had provoked protests among many who worried that the FCC was shirking its responsibility to protect open access.

Today, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler struck an emphatically reassuring tone, saying the proposal does not authorize paid prioritization. But numerous observers claim that that’s exactly what it does.

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NPR Story
2:31 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

What Happens To The Junk Donated To Charity

Every morning St. Vincent de Paul auctions off donations that won't sell at the store. (Peter O'Dowd/KJZZ)

Donations of unwanted clothes keep hundreds of millions of pounds of trash out of local landfills. But, in the end, a lot of the contributions that charities like Goodwill and the Salvation Army receive are basically garbage.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Peter O'Dowd of KJZZ tells us what happens to the stuff that doesn’t sell in thrift stores.

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Wisdom Watch
11:37 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Oldest National Park Ranger Shares 'What Gets Remembered'

Betty Reid Soskin, 92, is the oldest active full-time National Park Service ranger in the United States. She and her colleagues at the Rosie the Riveter World War II Home Front National Historical Park are preparing to unveil new permanent exhibits at the park on May 24.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 1:26 pm

As 92-year-old Betty Reid Soskin helped hash out plans for a new national park 13 years ago, this is what stuck in her mind: "What gets remembered is a function of who's in the room doing the remembering."

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Education
11:37 am
Thu May 15, 2014

Educating Girls: Big Payoff For $45 A Year

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Nigeria has been in the news a lot lately. That's since the militant Islamic organization Boko Haram kidnapped hundreds of schoolgirls on April 15. Professed to be against Western education, Boko Haram took the girls away from their books and their teachers and have threatened to sell them as wives and slaves.

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