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Planet Money
11:33 am
Fri October 19, 2012

Watch Our Fake Presidential Candidate's First Real Ad

The fake candidate.
Lam Vo NPR

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 6:12 pm

The story so far: A panel of economists from across the political spectrum came up with a presidential platform they could all support. It was a platform that would doom any real candidate. So we created a fake one.

We tested out one of our key ideas — eliminating the mortgage-interest tax deduction — on a focus group. They hated it.

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Author Interviews
11:21 am
Fri October 19, 2012

Baratunde Thurston Explains 'How To Be Black'

Baratunde Thurston is an American comedian and the digital director of The Onion. He co-founded the black political blog Jack & Jill Politics. He is also a prolific tweeter." href="/post/baratunde-thurston-explains-how-be-black" class="noexit lightbox">
Baratunde Thurston is an American comedian and the digital director of The Onion. He co-founded the black political blog Jack & Jill Politics. He is also a prolific tweeter.
Courtesy of the author

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 11:55 am

This interview was originally broadcast on Feb. 1, 2012. How to Be Black will be released in paperback on Oct. 30.

It's no coincidence that Baratunde Thurston's new memoir and satirical self-help book How to Be Black was slated for release on the first day of Black History Month.

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NPR Story
11:12 am
Fri October 19, 2012

Scientists In The Dark Over Birth Of The Moon

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 3:55 pm

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY, I'm Flora Lichtman, filling in for Ira Flatow today. The moon, it's our nearest neighbor, but we don't know much about where our companion came from. In the 1800s, Charles Darwin's son, Sir George Darwin, proposed that maybe the moon just popped off from the Earth when the Earth was spinning much faster than it is today.

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NPR Story
11:12 am
Fri October 19, 2012

Making Sense Of Presidential Polls

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 3:55 pm

In less than a month, the 2012 presidential election turned from an almost certain victory for President Obama to a neck-and-neck race. New York Times blogger and statistician Nate Silver and Princeton neuroscientist Sam Wang talk about making sense of the polls--and why not all votes are created equal.

BackTalk
10:59 am
Fri October 19, 2012

Listeners Love Fiasco And Cash Connection

Tell Me More host Michel Martin and editor Ammad Omar open up the mailbag to see what listeners have to say. This week, the program's Twitter feed lit up when rapper Lupe Fiasco talked about why he's a big Johnny Cash fan.

Faith Matters
10:59 am
Fri October 19, 2012

Young Mormon Women 'Thrilled' By New Mission Age

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, we dig into our digital mailbox to hear from you about stories that caught your attention this week. That's BackTalk and it's coming up in a few minutes.

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Music
10:59 am
Fri October 19, 2012

Public Enemy And The Music That Gives Arsalan His Game

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 2:09 pm

Civil rights attorney Arsalan Iftikhar regularly offers his thoughts about sports, politics and pop culture in Tell Me More's Barbershop roundtable. For the occasional series In Your Ear, Iftikhar shares his thoughts on the songs that make him dance and keep him happy, including Public Enemy's "He Got Game."

Election 2012
10:59 am
Fri October 19, 2012

Are Candidates Ignoring the Poor?

President Obama and Governor Romney have discussed the middle class a great deal during the debates, but the candidates haven't spent nearly as much time talking about the poor. To get a read on the state of poverty in America, host Michel Martin talks with Irwin Redlener, of the Children's Health Fund and Timothy Noah, a columnist for The New Republic.

Movie Reviews
9:51 am
Fri October 19, 2012

'The Sessions': Sex, Comedy And Something More

Living most of his life in an iron lung forces Mark O'Brien (John Hawkes) to see the world from a different point of view.
Fox Searchlight

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 9:53 pm

In 1983, Berkeley poet and journalist Mark O'Brien wrote an article about sexual surrogates — women and men trained to help people with disabilities learn to use their bodies to give themselves and others erotic pleasure.

For O'Brien, the subject wasn't academic. After a bout of childhood polio, he had spent much of his life in an iron lung. He could talk, and tap out words on a typewriter holding a stick in his mouth. He could feel things below the neck. But he couldn't move his muscles.

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Around the Nation
6:26 am
Fri October 19, 2012

Financially-Strapped Mass. Man Wins Lottery

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 12:03 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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