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The Salt
3:32 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Tuna Noodle Casserole, A Hot Dish In Need Of An Update, Gets One

Classic tuna noodle casserole is an often maligned yet much beloved hot dish.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 6:19 pm

Desperation, laziness, overwhelming craving: I say these are three conditions that drive a person to make a tuna noodle casserole.

The desperation? A cupboard bare except for those nonperishable standards: pasta, a can of tuna and a can of cream of mushroom soup. Our friends along the Northeast Seaboard probably know what we're talking about right now.

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NPR Story
1:37 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

'Race-Baiter': Media Feed On Fear And Prejudice

Eric Deggans is the TV and media critic for the Tampa Bay Times.
Carrie Pratt Simply Blue Studios

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 10:20 am

In his new book, Race-Baiter, media critic Eric Deggans says modern media outlets trade in bigotry and bias to build audience and sell advertising.

Deggans dissects media coverage of events such as Hurricane Katrina, the Trayvon Martin case and the 2012 presidential election to build an argument that Americans lack the right vocabulary for having important conversations about race, and that the echo chambers of our fractured media landscape aren't helping. The fix, he says, is a more savvy audience that demands better conversations.

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Author Interviews
1:26 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Ricks: Firing 'The Generals' To Fight Better Wars?

Penguin Group USA

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 4:17 pm

When Thomas Ricks first learned that Terry Allen, the successful general in charge of the 1st Infantry Division during World War II's Sicily campaign, had been fired, he says, his jaw dropped.

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Afghanistan
1:05 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Afghanistan: When Should Longest U.S. War End?

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 4:15 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. The war in Afghanistan has gone largely unmentioned by both presidential campaigns. When it does come up, conversations focus not so much on what happening now but withdrawal.

If timetables hold, the U.S. and NATO will hand over combat operations to Afghan forces by the end of 2014, but plans call for American troops to stay on for many years in support and counterterrorism roles.

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Around the Nation
1:05 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Sandy Especially Tough On Vulnerable Populations

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 4:15 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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Politics
1:05 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Well-Liked Leaders Know The Secret: Make Us Laugh

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 4:15 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Last week, after Donald Trump asked President Obama to produce more records to prove his citizenship, the president used an appearance on "The Tonight Show" to dismiss the issue with a one-liner. Host Jay Leno asked, what's this thing between you and Trump?

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "THE TONIGHT SHOW WITH JAY LENO")

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: This all dates back to when we were growing up together in Kenya.

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Opinion
12:30 pm
Thu November 1, 2012

Even Americans Find Some Britishisms 'Spot On'

Geoff Nunberg says that, like a lot of the Britishisms peppering American speech these days, "spot on" falls somewhere in the blurry region between affectation and flash.
Zdenek Ryzner iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 2:26 pm

Mitt Romney was on CNN not long ago defending the claims in his campaign ads — "We've been absolutely spot on," he said. Politics aside, the expression had me doing an audible roll of my eyes. I've always associated "spot on" with the type of Englishman who's played by Terry-Thomas or John Cleese, someone who pronounces "yes" and "ears" in the same way — "eeahzz." It shows up when people do send-ups of plummy British speech. "I say — spot on, old chap!"

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NPR Story
10:43 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Who Is Native American, And Who Decides That?

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 11:03 am

More than five million people in the U.S. claim some form of Native American identity, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. November is Native American Heritage Month and host Michel Martin kicks it off with the first in a series of conversations with author Anton Treuer. He talks about who is Native American and how that identity is determined.

NPR Story
10:43 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Sandy Raises Concerns For Nation's Infrastructure

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 11:03 am

The cleanup effort is underway after superstorm Sandy, and questions are cropping up about the country's aging infrastructure. Henry Gomez reports for The Plain Dealer in Cleveland. He put his questions to President Obama and GOP nominee Mitt Romney well before the storm hit. He speaks with host Michel Martin, as part of NPR's "Solve This" series.

NPR Story
10:43 am
Thu November 1, 2012

Voter Fraud Billboards Stir Controversy

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 10:45 am

Billboards declaring "Voter Fraud is a Felony" were recently taken down in some urban Ohio and Wisconsin areas. But not before civil rights groups said they could intimidate minority voters and decrease turnout. Host Michel Martin talks with WCPN reporter Brian Bull about the billboards, who paid for them, and concerns about their lasting impact.

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