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The Two-Way
6:05 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Armstrong Doping Scandal: Some Cyclists 'Made The Right Choice' Not To Cheat

Former cyclist Scott Mercier has gained notoriety for refusing to go on a doping program 15 years ago. Here, Mercier (in blue jersey) rides just ahead of cyclist Chris Horner in 1997.
Jed Jacobsohn Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 1:44 pm

Reactions to the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency's recently released report on cyclist Lance Armstrong's use of performance-enhancing drugs have ranged from denial to anger and disappointment. Some have said Armstrong merely did what it took to compete with pro racers, all of them chemically enhanced. But that's just not true, says Joe Lindsey, a contributor to Bicycling magazine.

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Religion
5:44 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Nuns: We'll Talk to Vatican But Won't Compromise

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 4:47 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And we go now to St. Louis, where hundreds of nuns have been meeting this week to map out strategy. They were planning their response to harsh criticism from the Vatican. The Vatican called for reform of the group after accusing the nuns of failing to adhere to doctrine on issues such as contraception and homosexuality.

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Around the Nation
5:32 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Florida's Dozier School For Boys: A True Horror Story

Dick Colon, one of the White House Boys, walks through grave sites near the Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Fla. Several men who suffered abuse and severe beatings believe the crosses mark the graves of boys who were killed at the school, victims of punishments that went too far.
Phil Coale AP

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 5:47 pm

Over the past decade, hundreds of men have come forward to tell gruesome stories of abuse and terrible beatings they suffered at Florida's Dozier School for Boys, a notorious, state-run institution that closed last year after more than a century.

Known as the "White House Boys," these 300-some men were sent as boys to the reform school in the small panhandle town of Mariana in the 1950s and 1960s. They have joined together over the years to tell their stories of the violence administered in a small building on the school's grounds they knew as the White House.

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It's All Politics
5:26 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Study: Secret Donors Significantly Fueling Pro-Romney TV Ads

Costumed demonstrators on Oct. 3 in Denver, before the first presidential debate.
Doug Pensinger Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 5:46 pm

Since April, most of the TV ads supporting Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney have come from outside groups, not from Romney's own campaign. And those groups raised more than half of their money from secret donors, according to a six-month study of ads.

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The Two-Way
3:08 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Debate Preview: Romney Aide On How GOP Nominee Would Confront Iran

Dan Senor, a senior adviser to Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney.
Jason Reed Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue October 16, 2012 9:45 am

  • Romney adviser Dan Senor talking with NPR's Steve Inskeep

A President Mitt Romney would make the "military option" a credible threat in the effort to keep Iran from developing nuclear weapons by repeatedly saying that it "remains on the table, that it is real" and by making sure that senior officials don't imply otherwise, a top foreign policy adviser to the 2012 Republican presidential nominee tells Morning Edition.

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World Cafe
2:59 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Next: Allah-Las

Allah-Las.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 2:54 pm

  • Hear two new tracks from Allah-Las

The vintage sounds of Allah-Las combine the harmonies and hooks of the British Invasion with the atmosphere of a West Coast psychedelic band. Three of the group's four members met while working at the legendary record store Amoeba, where they discovered a mutual love for '60s rock and the beach.

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The Salt
2:33 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Jerusalem: A Love Letter To Food And Memories Of Home

A boy chooses fruit from a stall as Jerusalem market vendors swirl around him.
Jonathan Lovekin Ten Speed Press

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 5:46 pm

Jerusalem is known for its bitter politics, a divided city where decades of religious and political strife have torn away shared spaces. But as British-Israeli chef Yotam Ottolenghi tells NPR's Melissa Block, if there's one place in which Jerusalemites of all stripes still stand united, it's in their love of food.

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Movie Interviews
1:32 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

Tyler Perry Transforms: From Madea To Family Man

Tyler Perry is currently starring in the new action thriller Alex Cross, which opens in theaters on Friday.
Sidney Baldwin 2012 Summit Entertainment LLC

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 1:40 pm

Whenever Tyler Perry is in front of the camera, he's usually behind it as well. A screenwriter, director, producer and star, Perry grew up poor in New Orleans, but he has become a movie phenomenon — he was described in the New Yorker as the most financially successful black man the American film industry has ever known.

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Remembrances
1:12 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

'Killing Fields' Author Remembers Cambodian King

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 3:05 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Few stories in the 20th century are more tragic than the fate of Cambodia, a small, peaceful country on the sidelines of the war in Vietnam. Cambodia would be invaded by both sides, carpet-bombed by the United States, taken over by murderous Maoists, invaded again by the Vietnamese and left to wither for a decade by a grotesque, international impasse.

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Politics
12:49 pm
Mon October 15, 2012

How Much Power Does The President Really Have?

In three weeks, millions of Americans cast their vote for president in an election that both campaigns depict as a stark choice between two fundamentally different visions for the country. But the chief executive's power is limited in real ways, by Congress, foreign interests, and other players.

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