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Space
8:51 am
Tue June 5, 2012

Rare Transit Of Venus 'A Beautiful Event'

Venus passes between Earth and the sun during its last transit on June 8, 2004, as seen from Manila, Philippines. The next transit of Venus will be in 2117.
Bullit Marquez AP

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 11:11 am

A rare astronomical event will take place Tuesday evening: The planet Venus will pass between Earth and the sun, appearing as a small black dot moving across the sun's bright disk. It's known as the transit of Venus, and it won't happen again for more than 100 years.

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Humans
3:37 pm
Sat June 2, 2012

Ancient Suburb Near St. Louis Could Be Lost Forever

Illinois State Archaeological Survey crew members scrape the soil in search of Cahokian artifacts. The crumbling smokestacks of a 19th century meat packing plant are visible in the background, along with a bulldozer working on the current interstate freeway construction.
Courtesy of the Illinois State Archaeological Survey, University of Illinois

Originally published on Sat June 2, 2012 10:01 am

Across the Mississippi River from St. Louis' famous Gateway Arch is a part of Illinois that's a post-industrial wasteland.

Some hope the construction of a new bridge across the Mississippi River will help revitalize the area. But archaeologists worry future development could destroy what's left of another neighborhood — one that flourished there almost a thousand years ago.

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Beer & Baseball
5:58 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

No Beer Goggles For Baseball Stadium Brew Prices

A fan of the St. Louis Cardinals buys a beer from a vendor prior to Game 3 of the World Series against the Detroit Tigers at Busch Stadium in 2006. At 56 cents an ounce, St. Louis is second only to Boston for the priciest ballpark brew in the country.
Jamie Squire Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 5:13 pm

Change has been the story of the season for the Miami Marlins, formerly the Florida Marlins. With a new coach, a new name, new team colors and a new stadium the baseball team set a franchise record for winning games in May.

But one tradition isn't changing anytime soon: beer. Ordering a beer at a baseball game is as American as apple pie. So is forking over a small fortune for that beer.

According to an analysis by TheStreet.com, the most expensive beer of any baseball stadium is sold at the new Marlins Park, where baseball fans pay $8 for a Bud Light draft.

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The Two-Way
3:16 pm
Wed May 30, 2012

VIDEO: 'Let my people go:' Illinois state Rep loses cool on house floor

Illinois State Rep. Mike Bost.
YouTube

Originally published on Wed May 30, 2012 3:19 pm

We already know that budgets and austerity measures are controversial, especially when it concerns the pensions of public employees. Wisconsin is solid proof. But if you need another reminder of just how combustive it gets when you mix politics, unions and public employees, just take a look at this video:

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Food / St. Louis Public Radio on NPR
8:08 pm
Mon May 28, 2012

'Flash Drought' Threatens To Destroy Mo. Crops

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block. Climatologists call it a flash drought - a sudden, unexpected burst of high temperatures and low humidity. It can wither crops in a matter of days and it's happening in many parts of the Midwest. With temperatures hovering above 90 degrees, farmers worry the weather could have disastrous consequences on corn and other crops.

From St. Louis Public Radio, Adam Allington has that story.

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Around the Nation / Joplin
9:57 am
Fri May 18, 2012

After devastating tornado, Joplin High bounces back

The main entrance of Joplin High School was severely damaged in a May 2011 tornado.
Mark Schiefelbein AP

Originally published on Thu May 17, 2012 3:33 pm

Nearly one year ago, a devastating tornado ripped through the city of Joplin, Mo. The tornado was the deadliest in the U.S in almost 60 years, killing 161 people and injuring more than 900. But life for Joplin's residents is finally starting to return to normal.

That includes life for students at Joplin High School. The school was destroyed by the tornado just hours after last year's commencement ceremony. Although the school's old location is still in ruins, the city has found a temporary solution to keep classes going.

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Game Changers
2:49 pm
Wed May 16, 2012

St. Louisan, chess champ Nakamura: Next Bobby Fischer?

Chess Club and Scholastic Center of St. Louis

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 4:32 pm

At the U.S. Chess Championships under way in St. Louis, all eyes are on America's top-ranked player, and the favorite going into the tournament, Hikaru Nakamura.

During the past decade, Nakamura has made a name for himself as the new superstar of American chess, and with it, he's become a kind of spokesperson for a game that hasn't been too popular in this country since the days of world champion Bobby Fischer.

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Around the Nation - Joplin
9:46 am
Mon May 7, 2012

Tornado Recovery Offers Joplin Students New Lessons

In this photo taken June 14, 2011, a damaged sign for Joplin High School (transformed into "hope" with tape) is seen in front of the school. The school was one of three in the city destroyed by an EF-5 tornado that wiped out much of the community.
Charlie Riedel AP

Originally published on Mon May 7, 2012 5:34 am

Graduation is supposed to in part be about celebrating the future, but last year in Joplin, Mo., shortly after the high school graduation ceremony, an EF-5 tornado — the highest-strength rating — destroyed one-third of the city and killed 161 people, including one teen who had received his diploma that day.

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Deceptive Cadence
12:25 pm
Tue April 17, 2012

St. Louis native Kevin Puts wins music Pulitzer for World War I opera 'Silent Night'

Troy Cook (left) as Father Palmer and John Robert Lindsey as Jonathan Dale in the Minnesota Opera production of Silent Night, which won composer Kevin Puts the Pulitzer Prize for music.
Michal Daniel Minnesota Opera

Originally published on Mon April 16, 2012 6:38 pm

New York-based composer and Peabody Institute faculty member Kevin Puts has won the Pulitizer Prize for music with Silent Night, his first opera. The work received its world premiere in November in at Minnesota Opera in St. Paul.

Pulitzer officials described Silent Night as "a stirring opera that recounts the true story of a spontaneous cease-fire among Scottish, French and Germans during World War I, displaying versatility of style and cutting straight to the heart."

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Animals
4:56 pm
Thu April 5, 2012

White-Nose Syndrome: A scourge in the bat caves

A little brown bat with white-nose syndrome hangs in Greeley Mine, Vt., in March 2009. The disease is spreading across the country, currently affecting bat populations in 19 states.
Marvin Moriarty U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Originally published on Thu April 5, 2012 2:01 pm

A disease that has killed more than 5.5 million bats in the eastern United States and Canada is making its way west. White-nose syndrome has now been diagnosed in three Missouri bats — the first confirmed cases west of the Mississippi. And scientists say it won't stop there.

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