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Middle East
1:25 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

In Syria, Tensions And Buildings Burn

Originally published on Sun October 7, 2012 7:23 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Over 18 months Syria has come unraveled. Infuriated by government brutality and emboldened by the Arab Spring, protestors in provincial cities took to the streets and spawned a movement that evolved in the face of ever-escalating violence to a revolution.

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NPR Story
1:19 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Bill Pullman, Headed Back To '1600 Penn'

Bill Pullman plays Ken, and Marcia Cross plays his wife, Mary, in Bringing Up Bobby.
Monterey Media

Originally published on Tue October 2, 2012 12:10 pm

Bill Pullman enjoyed a star turn as the president of the United States in Independence Day. And in an upcoming NBC show, 1600 Penn, he's back in the White House. He's also starring in a new film, Bringing Up Bobby.

"This is an amazing time to be making a comedy about the White House," Pullman tells NPR's Neal Conan. "There's all these ... articles about the misspeaking that the presidents have done ... and I thought, boy, these are the lines I get to say, you know?"

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The Fresh Air Interview
1:13 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

In Memoir, Neil Young Wages 'Heavy Peace'

Neil Young.
Pegi Young

Originally published on Mon October 1, 2012 3:00 pm

At age 66, Neil Young has taken the advice of his doctor and stopped smoking marijuana — though he's not "making any promises," he says.

The Canadian singer-songwriter and guitarist has a new memoir titled Waging Heavy Peace, in which he talks about his music, family and medical conditions, including polio, epilepsy and a brain aneurysm. In the book, he describes a particularly painful procedure he went through, which has since been banished.

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World Cafe
11:59 am
Mon October 1, 2012

JD McPherson On World Cafe

JD McPherson.
Samantha Franklin

Originally published on Mon October 1, 2012 2:57 pm

JD McPherson's "big break" came when he introduced himself to producer and bassist Jimmy Sutton of The Four Charms via MySpace. After receiving several of McPherson's demos, Sutton immediately recognized his talent, and the Oklahoma native moved to Chicago to begin recording with Sutton. The pair released a music video for "North Side Gal," which became a viral hit.

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History
11:05 am
Mon October 1, 2012

Dominicans, Haitians Remember Parsley Massacre

October marks 75 years since a dark period in the Dominican Republic's history. In 1937, President Rafael Leonidas Trujillo ordered the execution of thousands of ethnic Haitians. Guest host Celeste Headlee discusses the "Parsley Massacre" with two noted authors, one Dominican and one Haitian: Julia Alvarez and Edwidge Danticat.

Arts & Life
10:57 am
Mon October 1, 2012

First Black Editor-In-Chief For Conde Nast

Keija Minor recently made history when she became the first African-American editor-in-chief of a Conde Nast publication. She sits down with guest host Celeste Headlee to talk about her plans for Brides magazine and how she views her historic achievement.

Education
10:57 am
Mon October 1, 2012

Join The Education Conversation With Tell Me More

Tell Me More will host a live radio broadcast and Twitter Education Forum on October 10th. Host Michel Martin will discuss the roles of teachers, parents, government, business --- and of course, social media. To do that, Martin wants to start the conversation now with listeners via Twitter. Join Tell Me More on Twitter today by using #npredchat.

Law
10:57 am
Mon October 1, 2012

Affirmative Action Back On Supreme Court Docket

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, Hispaniola may be a popular vacation destination, but the nations that share that island have a complicated and sometimes violent history. We'll look back 75 years to a massacre that caused a rift between Dominicans and Haitians. That's in a moment.

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Books
10:29 am
Mon October 1, 2012

Being 'Joseph Anton,' Rediscovering Salman Rushdie

Salman Rushdie is the author of The Satanic Verses, which inspired a fatwah calling for his death. His novel Midnight's Children has been adapted into a film that opens in the U.S. on Nov. 2.
Johannes Eisele AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 9:39 am

In the fall of 1989, I was walking down a London street when someone handed me a flier that asked, "Should Rushdie Die?" The following afternoon, I headed over to the Royal Albert Hall to hear that question answered by a renowned Islamic scholar.

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NPR Story
9:15 am
Mon October 1, 2012

Watch This: Native American Author Sherman Alexie

Author and Spokane Indian Sherman Alexie won the American Book Award in 1996 for Reservation Blues.
Seth Wenig AP

Originally published on Mon October 8, 2012 3:35 am

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