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Simon Says
10:33 am
Sat September 22, 2012

The Emoticon Turns 30, Seems Happy About It :-)

The emoticon turns 30 this week.
iStockphoto.com

The emoticon, punctuation to depict a facial expression, began 30 years ago this week. Using three keystrokes, the colon, dash and parenthesis, to suggest a smile may not be a great scientific advance, like the coronary stent or computer chip. But the emoticon has been simple, useful and enduring.

There had been previous hints of emoticons. A newspaper transcript of Abraham Lincoln drawing a laugh in 1862 follows it with a semi-colon and parentheses, but that may have simply been a printer's typo.

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It's All Politics
9:35 am
Sat September 22, 2012

There's Still Time For Romney To Make An Effective Case

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney speaks at a campaign event at the Cox Pavilion Friday in Las Vegas.
David Becker Getty Images

Despite a series of political fumbles, Mitt Romney is "still very much in the game," according to political strategist Steve Schmidt. But, he says, it will take some work.

Schmidt served as John McCain's senior strategist in the 2008 election and helped George W. Bush get reelected in 2004. He spoke with Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon about the Romney campaign's stresses.

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Education
9:35 am
Sat September 22, 2012

Duncan On Chicago: 'When Adults Fight, Kids Lose'

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Chicago teachers voted to end their strike this week, the first in 25 years, and came back to class. It brought an end to a heated confrontation between leaders of the Chicago teachers union and Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who repeated this phrase time and again during the strike.

MAYOR RAHM EMANUEL: This was a strike of choice and it's a wrong choice for the children. Really, it was a choice.

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The Two-Way
9:03 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

After Seven Days, Chicago Teachers Vote To Suspend Strike

Teacher Patty Westcott pickets outside Clissold Elementary School in Chicago on Tuesday.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 6:43 am

Update at 6:15 p.m. ET. Strike Suspended:

Chicago teachers voted to suspend a strike that had gone into its seventh day today.

The Chicago Sun-Times reports that means that 350,000 students in the nation's third-largest school district will return to classrooms this week.

The AP reports:

"The union's House of Delegates voted Tuesday to suspend the strike after learning details of a tentative contract agreement.

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Shots - Health Blog
3:44 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Teachers' Expectations Can Influence How Students Perform

Teachers interact differently with students expected to succeed. But they can be trained to change those classroom behaviors.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 8:52 am

In my Morning Edition story today, I look at expectations — specifically, how teacher expectations can affect the performance of the children they teach.

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It's All Politics
1:47 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Football And (Conservative) Politics Do Mix For Some NFL Fans

Rowdy Smith, who brought his sons to the St. Louis Rams game on Sunday, said that President Obama's "not a leader" and is hurting the energy industry. He's shown here walking in front of the Americans for Prosperity campaign bus.
Alan Greenblatt NPR

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 2:18 pm

There's nothing like a ready-made crowd to help a group get its message out. That's why a conservative political organization set up shop Sunday outside the St. Louis Rams-Washington Redskins NFL football game.

Why mix politics and football?

"People are here," explained Patrick Werner, Missouri state director for Americans for Prosperity.

Football fans are used to encountering promotional tents for sports-talk radio stations and brands of beer and mixed nuts on their way to the game. Not so many of them expect to discuss politics as part of the pregame festivities.

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Monkey See
12:26 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

The 25 magic words of American television

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 11:13 am

Tonight, two new fall shows premiere: Mob Doctor, which is about a doctor who works for the mob, and Revolution, which is about a devastating global power outage and — more than that — a revolution.

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The Salt
2:54 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

Love To Hate Cilantro? It's In Your Genes And Maybe, In Your Head

The very sight of this lacy, green herb can cause some people to scream. The great cilantro debate heats up as scientists start pinpointing cilantrophobe genes.
lion heart vintage Flickr.com

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 1:45 pm

There's no question that cilantro is a polarizing herb. Some of us heap it onto salsas and soups with gusto while others avoid cilantro because it smells like soap and tastes like crushed bugs.

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The Picture Show
1:10 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

Found photos: The 1930s in full color

Charles W. Cushman gazes across the Grand Canyon in Arizona, November 1939
The Charles W. Cushman Photograph Collection/Indiana University

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 7:51 am

Not just the '30s — also the three decades that followed. But let's not spoil the fun. Basically: Go here to experience a special interactive about the amazing found photos of Charles W. Cushman. You won't regret it!

Then come back and leave your comments below — or on Twitter: #nprcushman

Economy
9:57 am
Fri September 14, 2012

Discouraged in hunt for a job, many stop looking

A job fair was held at the The Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C., last month. The U.S. unemployment rate declined in August in part because the number of "discouraged workers" climbed.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 10:43 am

The U.S. population is growing. In normal times, the labor force — working or not — would be growing too. But these are not normal times, and the labor force is actually smaller than it was four years ago, meaning millions of people who should be there aren't.

The reasons people drop out of the workforce are myriad. People go back to school. Others have health issues or family priorities that keep them from looking for work. But some stop looking because they are discouraged.

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