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The Salt
2:54 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

Love To Hate Cilantro? It's In Your Genes And Maybe, In Your Head

The very sight of this lacy, green herb can cause some people to scream. The great cilantro debate heats up as scientists start pinpointing cilantrophobe genes.
lion heart vintage Flickr.com

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 1:45 pm

There's no question that cilantro is a polarizing herb. Some of us heap it onto salsas and soups with gusto while others avoid cilantro because it smells like soap and tastes like crushed bugs.

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The Picture Show
1:10 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

Found photos: The 1930s in full color

Charles W. Cushman gazes across the Grand Canyon in Arizona, November 1939
The Charles W. Cushman Photograph Collection/Indiana University

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 7:51 am

Not just the '30s — also the three decades that followed. But let's not spoil the fun. Basically: Go here to experience a special interactive about the amazing found photos of Charles W. Cushman. You won't regret it!

Then come back and leave your comments below — or on Twitter: #nprcushman

Economy
9:57 am
Fri September 14, 2012

Discouraged in hunt for a job, many stop looking

A job fair was held at the The Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C., last month. The U.S. unemployment rate declined in August in part because the number of "discouraged workers" climbed.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 10:43 am

The U.S. population is growing. In normal times, the labor force — working or not — would be growing too. But these are not normal times, and the labor force is actually smaller than it was four years ago, meaning millions of people who should be there aren't.

The reasons people drop out of the workforce are myriad. People go back to school. Others have health issues or family priorities that keep them from looking for work. But some stop looking because they are discouraged.

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The Two-Way
5:53 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

What a face: Monkey, new to science, found in Africa

Researchers have identified a new species of African monkey, locally known as the lesula.
Maurice Emetshu, Noel Rowe PLOS ONE/AP

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 10:19 pm

It would seem difficult to overlook something as large as a new species of monkey, but scientists had no idea about the lesula until just a few years ago when conservation biologist John Hart discovered a specimen being kept as a pet in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

In retrospect, the monkey's striking, almost humanlike face should have made it hard to miss, and Hart, who spoke with All Things Considered host Melissa Block, is the first to admit that this new monkey was apparently not such a mystery to the Congolese themselves.

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Education
2:23 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

What's at stake for U.S. teachers

Chicago Teachers Union members picket the CPS headquarters in Chicago on Thursday, the fourth day of their strike.
John Gress Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 3:46 pm

The intractable issues that led to the teachers' strike in Chicago are being argued about in states and school districts across the country.

The past decade has been a time of enormous ferment in education policy, with numerous new ideas and approaches being promoted by everyone from conservative think tanks to the well-heeled Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to Obama administration officials.

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Shots - Health Blog
12:09 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

Report: Whooping cough vaccine's protection fades quickly

Nurse Fatima Guillen (left) gives 4-year-old Kimberly Magdeleno a whooping cough booster shot at a health clinic in Tacoma, Wash., in May.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 10:24 am

To protect children against whooping cough, doctors recommend five shots of vaccine before they turn 7.

But what happens after that? How long does the protection last?

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The Two-Way
11:59 am
Thu September 13, 2012

Federal Reserve Announces New Round Of Economic Stimulus

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke arrives for a dinner at the Jackson Hole Economic Symposium on Thursday.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 12:22 pm

Update at 12:31 p.m. ET. Federal Reserve Announces QE3:

The Federal Reserve announced it would spend $40 billion a month on bond purchases in an effort to stimulate the economy and drive the the unemployment rate down.

The Wall Street Journal says that unlike the first two rounds of Quantitative Easing, this time the Fed will focus solely on buying mortgage-backed securities.

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The Salt
11:20 am
Wed September 12, 2012

Five ways to spot a fake online review, restaurant or otherwise

One sign that a restaurant review is a fake is if it gives a very high or very low rating without many specifics.
Bill Oxford iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 1:47 pm

Thinking of going to a nice restaurant? Before you decide, you probably go online and read reviews of the place from other customers (or you listen to these actors read them to you). Online reviews of restaurants, travel deals, apps and just about anything you want to buy have become a powerful driver of consumer behavior. Unsurprisingly, they have also created a powerful incentive to cheat.

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Science
10:22 am
Tue September 11, 2012

A berry so shiny, it's irresistible (and inedible)

The shiny blue berries of the tropical Pollia condensata plant rely on their looks, not nutritional content, to attract birds to spread their seeds.
Silvia Vignolini et al. via PNAS

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 8:57 am

That fake fruit in the wooden bowls that hotels love to decorate their lobbies with never looks quite right. No, apparently it takes nature to make a fake that looks even better than the real thing.

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The Salt
10:57 am
Fri September 7, 2012

Panera (aka St. Louis Bread Co.) explores 'pay what you want' concept

This Panera Cares store in Chicago switched from for-profit to nonprofit this summer, and it started asking customers to pay whatever they want.
Niala Boodhoo for NPR

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 3:11 pm

The concept of "pay what you want" for goods and services is a nostalgic throwback to the days when people trusted one another just a little bit more, and it's something you expect to see at the occasional farm stand or at a hip, independent coffee shop.

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