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Digital Life
11:54 am
Wed February 26, 2014

Do Tech Startups Need More Diversity?

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 7:56 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We've spent a lot of time lately talking about the technology business and why more women and minorities aren't more present in those fields and how to get more diversity into those fields. But let's say you're already there. Let's say you're one of the people who already has the interest and the background and not only that, you're ready to do your own thing. Where do you go from there?

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Around the Nation
6:43 am
Wed February 26, 2014

Florida Man Tattoos Black Widow Spider On His Face

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. A Florida man decided to face his fear of spiders by tattooing a huge black widow on his face. The Daytona Beach News-Journal reports that 24-year-old Eric Ortiz chose to ink the arachnid because, quote, everybody fears spiders, and he wanted to see what people think. The lifelike tattoo has gotten reactions from startled jumps to you will never get a job. One person who does not think it's cool - his girlfriend. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:19 am
Wed February 26, 2014

Doctors Perform More Facial Hair Transplants

Originally published on Wed February 26, 2014 6:43 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene, with an update on hair transplants for your face. Beards and mustaches are becoming a popular trend, especially among hipsters. And if you can't grow one, why not buy one? One doctor says he's performing three-or-so facial hair transplants each week at his offices in Manhattan and Miami. The hair costs 7,000 bucks for a full beard. The procedure, which usually involves relocating hair from the head to face, takes about eight hours, razors not included.

Research News
4:09 am
Wed February 26, 2014

Researchers Debate Effectiveness Of Snow Helmets

Originally published on Wed February 26, 2014 6:43 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Olympic snowboarder Sarka Pancochova of the Czech Republic got a flurry of attention when she suffered a nasty crash on the slopes in Sochi that split her helmet. She's OK, the helmet absorbed some of the blow. More than two-thirds of Americans who ski or snowboard now wear helmets.

But as Fred Bever, of member station WBUR reports, there are still the question about how much protection they really provide.

(SOUNDBITE OF SKIING)

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NPR Story
4:09 am
Wed February 26, 2014

Obama Tells Pentagon To Plan A Full Afghan Departure

Originally published on Wed February 26, 2014 6:43 am

Afghan President Hamid Karzai has refused to sign a security agreement that would keep U.S. troops in his country. Despite the pressure, Obama is giving Afghan officials more time to finish a deal.

NPR Story
4:09 am
Wed February 26, 2014

U.S. Response To Syria's Humanitarian Crisis Criticized

Originally published on Wed February 26, 2014 6:43 am

Washington Post columnist Michael Gerson describes the response to the Syrian crisis as "strategic despair." He and Michael Abramowitz of the Holocaust museum, tell Renee Montagne about what they saw.

All Tech Considered
4:22 pm
Tue February 25, 2014

ISO Romance: Dating Sites Help Older Singles

The fastest-growing part of the online dating market is people over 50, according the CEO of the Match Group.
Carmen Winant Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 7:01 pm

With nearly 40 percent of Americans over 50 single and many looking for love online, dating sites are catering to this fast-growing market.

Vicki Cherco, 58, of Libertyville, Ill., uses one called OurTime.com. Her most recent date went well. "He was good-looking and funny and nice and thoughtful and paid for everything and asked for my phone number and said he'd like to call me again," she says.

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Politics
4:22 pm
Tue February 25, 2014

Chris Christie's Sandy Problem

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie addresses a Feb. 12 gathering in Toms River, N.J., that included some victims still out of their homes or businesses as a result of Superstorm Sandy.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 7:01 pm

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is facing criticism over what was once a source of his political strength — his handling of Superstorm Sandy.

While national attention focuses on accusations that the governor's top aides created traffic jams to punish political adversaries, back home it's the slow storm recovery from Sandy that's causing him new headaches.

Sandy crashed into the Jersey Shore eight days before the 2012 presidential election. Republican Christie had been campaigning hard for Mitt Romney, and trashing President Obama.

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NPR Story
3:41 pm
Tue February 25, 2014

Citrus Recipes To Brighten Up A Winter Menu

Kathy's "Meyer Lemon Tart." (Kathy Gunst/Here & Now)

Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst has been thinking citrus: blood oranges, cara cara oranges, grapefruits and Meyer lemons.

“Citrus is kind of this perfect food,” she tells host Jeremy Hobson. “It’s low in calories, high in potassium, tons of vitamin C.”

Citrus can be used in salads, to enhance meat or fish, in desserts and even drinks. Gunst brings in a variety of fruit to taste, as well as a Meyer lemon tart and a blood orange soda. She also shares four recipes:

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NPR Story
3:41 pm
Tue February 25, 2014

Researchers Look For Clues To Polio-Like Illness In California Children

Jessica Tomei holds her 4-year-old daughter, Sofia Jarvis, during a news conference at Lucille Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford University on Monday, Feb. 24, 2014, in Palo Alto, Calif. Sofia is one of a handful of California children who has been diagnosed with a rare polio-like syndrome that has left her arm paralyzed. (Martha Mendoza/AP)

Since late 2012, between 20 and 25 children in California have developed sudden, permanent paralysis that looks similar to polio. Doctors and public health officials are looking for causes and similarities in the cases.

Dr. Keith Van Haren, a pediatric neurologist at the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford University, looked closely at five cases. Two of the samples tested positive for enterovirus 68, a rare virus which is from the same family as the polio virus.

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