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All Tech Considered
3:32 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Nick Bilton On Twitter's Creation Myth & 'Forgotten Founder'

A worker unveils a floor mat bearing the logo of Twitter on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 9:21 am

On arguably the biggest day in Twitter's history, we wanted to look back to find out just how it all started, because like many Silicon Valley companies, its origin story is fraught.

That's the subject of Nick Bilton's new book, Hatching Twitter: A True Story of Money, Power, Friendship, and Betrayal. On Thursday, he chatted with All Things Considered host Audie Cornish about the 140-character service's complicated history, how Twitter made his book reporting easier and the forgotten founder of Thursday's stock darling.

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NPR Story
3:32 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

When It Comes To Public Opinion, More News Is Not Good News For NSA

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 5:51 pm

New public opinion polls show distaste for National Security Agency surveillance does not break cleanly across party lines. Despite the administration's attempts otherwise, one new study finds that the more people know about the NSA, the more they dislike it.

Technology
3:32 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Twitter Goes Public And Its Stock Price Soars

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 5:51 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish, this week at NPR West in California.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block in Washington, D.C.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL RINGING)

BLOCK: Ringing the bell to open trading on the New York Stock Exchange today, @SirPatStew, @vivienneharr and @CherylFiandaca - all of them big users of Twitter - to mark the day the social networking site became a publicly traded company.

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Ask Me Another
3:12 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Trivia Freaks And Puzzle Geeks

Clap-sody In Blue. (OK, even we groaned about that one.)
Josh Rogosin NPR

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 8:54 am

Would you classify your high school self as an A/V nerd, band geek or mathlete? This week's show pays homage to them all. In the games, we'll spoil some famous films by not spoiling anything at all, teach you how to "put a Björk in it," and make an inordinate amount of cat jokes. And Paul Feig, director of Bridesmaids and The Heat, discusses why funny women should be bigger stars, and reflects on the legacy of his beloved creation, the short-lived TV series Freaks and Geeks.

The Salt
2:56 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

FDA Moves To Phase Out Remaining Trans Fats In Food Supply

Crisco was the original product made with partially hydrogenated soybean oil, which contains trans fats. Today, Crisco has only small amounts of the fats.
Tony Dejak AP

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 5:51 pm

If the Food and Drug Administration has its way, an era of food technology will soon end. The agency announced Thursday it is aiming to ban partially hydrogenated vegetable oils from all food products.

Margaret Hamburg, the FDA commissioner, said at a press conference that her agency has come to the preliminary conclusion that the oils "are not generally recognized as safe for use in food."

If the agency makes this decision final, it will mean a complete ban on this ingredient.

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TED Radio Hour
2:54 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Success

Is success objective or subjective?
George Doyle thinkstock.com

Originally published on Fri November 1, 2013 8:34 am

"There is real danger of a disconnect between what's on your business card and who you are deep inside, and it's not a disconnect that the world is ready to be patient with." — Alain de Botton

Success has become synonymous with financial wealth, influence and status. But can we define success in another way — one that welcomes a broader range of accomplishment? It may not be as obvious as you think. In this hour, TED speakers share ideas for what makes us successful.

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Author Interviews
2:50 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Roy Choi's Tacos Channel LA And The Immigrant Experience

Chef Roy Choi was named Food and Wine Magazine's Best New Chef in 2010.
Bobby Fisher Courtesy of Harper Collins

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 4:24 pm

Roy Choi is a chef who's celebrated for food that isn't fancy. He's one of the founders of the food truck movement, where instead of hot dogs or ice cream, more unusual, gourmet dishes are prepared and sold. His Kogi trucks specialize in tacos filled with Korean barbecue.

Choi was born in South Korea in 1970 and moved to Los Angeles with his parents at the age of 2. His parents owned a Korean restaurant near Anaheim for a few years when he was a child. He tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that his mother had some serious cooking talent.

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Fine Art
2:39 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Art Revolution Blooms After Arab Spring

A painter uses his brush against a policeman armed with a mace. This mural is at the intersection of Muhammad Mahmud Street and Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt.
Mona Abaza

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 3:10 pm

In the U.S., graffiti is often condemned as vandalism. But during the Arab Spring, artists say city walls were often the only places where they could talk back to tyrants.

Street art can be found across the Middle East and North Africa, and the Arab Spring protests inspired an artistic revolution. The "Creative Dissent" exhibit at the Arab American National Museum in Dearborn, Michigan is putting that art on display.

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NPR Story
2:30 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

'Here & Now' Interview Inspires Song Of The Year

Paul Monti is pictured in May 2011 with his son Jared's truck. Jared Monti was killed while serving in Afghanistan in 2006.(Anna Miller/Here & Now)

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 2:42 pm

At the Country Music Association Awards last night, “I Drive Your Truck” won Song of the Year.

The song tells the story of a Massachusetts father whose son was killed in Afghanistan. The father drives his son’s Dodge Ram to honor his memory.

Paul Monti talked about his son Jared’s truck with Here & Now’s Alex Ashlock in May 2011. A songwriter in Nashville heard that interview and co-wrote the song, which was recorded by Lee Brice.

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NPR Story
2:30 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Murder Of Teen Sheds Light On World Of Street Youth

22-year-old “James” from Tillamook, Oregon shows off his graffiti art in an Olympia alleyway. (Austin Jenkins/Northwest News Network)

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 2:38 pm

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