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Author Interviews
2:50 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Roy Choi's Tacos Channel LA And The Immigrant Experience

Chef Roy Choi was named Food and Wine Magazine's Best New Chef in 2010.
Bobby Fisher Courtesy of Harper Collins

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 4:24 pm

Roy Choi is a chef who's celebrated for food that isn't fancy. He's one of the founders of the food truck movement, where instead of hot dogs or ice cream, more unusual, gourmet dishes are prepared and sold. His Kogi trucks specialize in tacos filled with Korean barbecue.

Choi was born in South Korea in 1970 and moved to Los Angeles with his parents at the age of 2. His parents owned a Korean restaurant near Anaheim for a few years when he was a child. He tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that his mother had some serious cooking talent.

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Fine Art
2:39 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Art Revolution Blooms After Arab Spring

A painter uses his brush against a policeman armed with a mace. This mural is at the intersection of Muhammad Mahmud Street and Tahrir Square, Cairo, Egypt.
Mona Abaza

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 3:10 pm

In the U.S., graffiti is often condemned as vandalism. But during the Arab Spring, artists say city walls were often the only places where they could talk back to tyrants.

Street art can be found across the Middle East and North Africa, and the Arab Spring protests inspired an artistic revolution. The "Creative Dissent" exhibit at the Arab American National Museum in Dearborn, Michigan is putting that art on display.

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NPR Story
2:30 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

'Here & Now' Interview Inspires Song Of The Year

Paul Monti is pictured in May 2011 with his son Jared's truck. Jared Monti was killed while serving in Afghanistan in 2006.(Anna Miller/Here & Now)

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 2:42 pm

At the Country Music Association Awards last night, “I Drive Your Truck” won Song of the Year.

The song tells the story of a Massachusetts father whose son was killed in Afghanistan. The father drives his son’s Dodge Ram to honor his memory.

Paul Monti talked about his son Jared’s truck with Here & Now’s Alex Ashlock in May 2011. A songwriter in Nashville heard that interview and co-wrote the song, which was recorded by Lee Brice.

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NPR Story
2:30 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Murder Of Teen Sheds Light On World Of Street Youth

22-year-old “James” from Tillamook, Oregon shows off his graffiti art in an Olympia alleyway. (Austin Jenkins/Northwest News Network)

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 2:38 pm

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NPR Story
2:30 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

US Economic Growth Accelerates In Q3

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 2:42 pm

Things are looking up in the U.S. economy — at least for the third quarter of this year.

The gross domestic product (GDP) — the measure of goods and services — rose at a 2.8 percent annual rate, much stronger than expected.

Economists expected third-quarter growth to be around a 2 percent annual rate, according to a Dow Jones survey.

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Book Reviews
2:04 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

'Self-Help Messiah' Dale Carnegie Gets A Second Life In Print

Courtesy of Other Press

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 2:50 pm

"Make the other person feel important." "Let the other fellow feel that the idea is his." "Make people like you." Those are some of the peppy commands that have sent generations of Americans out into the world, determined to win friends and influence people — oh, and make big bucks.

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Parallels
12:30 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

Who Owns The Archives Of A Vanishing Iraqi Jewish World?

This colorfully illustrated French and Hebrew Passover Haggadah was published in Vienna in 1930. Caption on the image: "Eating Matzah." This restored document is part of an exhibit at the National Archives in Washington, D.C., that opens Nov. 8.
National Archives

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 11:22 am

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Parallels
11:10 am
Thu November 7, 2013

In Libya, The Militias Rule While Government Founders

Militias from towns throughout the country's west parade through Tripoli, Libya, in 2012. Analysts say the country is awash with heavy weapons in the hands of militias divided by tribe, ideology and region. The central government has little power over the gunmen.
Abdel Magid Al Fergany AP

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 5:51 pm

Zintan, a mountain town in northwestern Libya, is a place of gray and brown buildings, with little infrastructure, about 50,000 people and no central government control.

The Libyan government doesn't provide basic services, not even water. People use wells to provide for themselves. The local council runs all of Zintan's affairs out of a building in the center of town.

At the local militia base on the outskirts of town, we meet the keeper of Saif el-Islam Gadhafi, the son and one-time heir apparent of Moammar Gadhafi.

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NPR Story
10:37 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Typing Love Letters To St. Louis

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is actually on her way to St. Louis Public Radio. Coming up, we'll take a look at the Arab Spring through street art, paintings and photographs. We'll hear from the curator and a featured artist from a new exhibit at the Arab American National Museum. But first, as I just mentioned, TELL ME MORE is taking the show to St. Louis tomorrow.

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NPR Story
10:37 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Doctor In Eastern Congo: 'Not Normal To Be Attacked'

The eastern Congo is known to some as the 'rape capital of the world' because nearly 50 women are raped there every hour. Dr. Denis Mukwege, a gynecologist, has put his practice, and his life on the line, to help save these women. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with him about his work.

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