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Law
3:03 pm
Tue February 18, 2014

Florida's 'Santa Claus' Of Speeding Tickets Gets Clipped

Originally published on Tue February 18, 2014 6:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Motorists in north Florida know the town of Hampton as a speed trap, or at least the two-block stretch of Highway 301 that passes through Hampton. And now, state lawmakers are planning to get rid of it - not the stretch of highway, they plan to get rid of the town. To explain this, reporter Aaron Deslatte joins us from Orlando. He's the capital bureau chief for the Orlando Sentinel. Welcome to the program.

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Law
3:03 pm
Tue February 18, 2014

Once Neglected, Secretaries Of State Step Into The Spotlight

Originally published on Tue February 18, 2014 6:58 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Control of Congress won't be the only big question in this fall's elections. A quieter but critical battle is being waged over state-level races for secretary of state. In most states, that's the official in charge of running elections. Elections have become a political lightning rod. Many conservatives rail against voter fraud and lax rules, liberals say that's voter suppression. And now, as NPR's Peter Overby reports, superPACs want to nationalize the fight over secretary of state.

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Television
2:03 pm
Tue February 18, 2014

With Humor And A Nod To History, Fallon Takes Over 'The Tonight Show'

Jimmy Fallon took over as host of The Tonight Show on Monday. "I hope I do well," he told the audience. "I hope that you enjoy this."
Theo Wargo Getty Images for The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon

Opening nights of new incarnations of late-night TV talk shows are good, mostly, for first impressions — or, in the case of Jay Leno, sometimes a second impression. It's not fair to make strong judgments on the content alone, because a first show always is top-heavy with ideas, special guests and nervousness. But it is fair game to judge the set, the environment, the overall mood, and how well the host fits into the history of late-night television.

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Author Interviews
2:03 pm
Tue February 18, 2014

Teens Rehearse For Adulthood In Wolitzer's 'Interestings'

iStockphoto

Teen years are sort of a "rehearsal" for adulthood, author Meg Wolitzer tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross, and that's particularly true at the performing arts summer camp where her latest novel begins. It's 1974, and the main character, Jules, a newcomer to the camp, is invited into a circle of 15- and 16-year-olds who nickname themselves — with knowing irony — The Interestings.

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Law
11:22 am
Tue February 18, 2014

Verdict In Florida's Loud Music Trial Causes Uproar Over Self Defense Laws

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 7:54 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Today, we want to spend some time talking about that controversial verdict in the trial of Michael Dunn. He is the Florida man who fired into an SUV back in 2012, with four unarmed teenagers inside. He killed one of the teens, then-17-year-old Jordan Davis. Apparently, Dunn was angry because he felt the boys' music was too loud, and he decided they should turn it down. And then a verbal altercation ensued. That's why you might have seen this referred to as the loud music trial.

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World
11:22 am
Tue February 18, 2014

Is Egypt Cracking Down On Freedom Of Press?

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 7:54 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Switching gears now to a form of employment that has become increasingly dangerous in many places around the world. We hope you don't mind if we talk for a few minutes about our field - journalism. In Egypt, several Al Jazeera journalists are facing trial after weeks behind bars. They're accused of working with a terrorist group, among other things. In Iraq, there has been a spike in the number of journalists killed in recent months.

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Economy
11:22 am
Tue February 18, 2014

Long-Term Unemployed End Up Earning Less After They Get A Job

Originally published on Wed February 19, 2014 7:54 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now we want to take a look at the economy, and we wanted to focus today on people who have been unemployed for a while. There are currently 3.6 million Americans who've been unemployed for more than six months. That's according to the latest numbers from the Bureau of Labor statistics.

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NPR Story
7:08 am
Tue February 18, 2014

Candy Crush Saga's Developer Plans To Go Public

Originally published on Tue February 18, 2014 11:09 am

King Digital Entertainment filed for an initial public offering aimed at bringing in a half-billion dollars. The company revealed it has 128 million active daily users, with 93 million playing Candy Crush Saga, the Apple App Store's No. 2 highest-grossing game. King also makes Pet Rescue Saga and Farm Heroes Saga.

Around the Nation
5:13 am
Tue February 18, 2014

Woman Arrested For Not Returning Movie Rental

Originally published on Tue February 18, 2014 10:03 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Kayla Finley is finally paying for her crime. Back in 2005, the South Carolina woman rented a movie. It was "Monster-In-Law," starring Jane Fonda and JLo on VHS. She never returned it. The movie store is now closed but there was still a warrant out for her arrest and police nabbed her last week. She spent a night in jail. Given the reviews of the movie, she should've been given time served for the 101 minutes she spent watching that film. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:00 am
Tue February 18, 2014

Association Warns Of A Possible Clown Shortage

Originally published on Tue February 18, 2014 10:03 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

Sad clown face, we're headed for a clown shortage. As the head of a clown organization told the New York Daily News: Clowns just aren't cool anymore. Rubber noses and rainbow wigs just can't compete for young talent with tech startups and Wall Street. That's a pie in the face for the World Clown Association and its aging clown population. Its membership numbers have dropped like a pair of oversized polka dot trousers.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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