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All Tech Considered
11:47 am
Mon October 28, 2013

What You Need To Know About Babies, Toddlers And Screen Time

Eva Hu-Stiles virtually interacts with her grandmother. iPad assist by Elise Hu-Stiles.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Tue October 29, 2013 11:15 am

This week, we're exploring the tech frontier through the eyes of our children. So we're starting with the littlest ones — babies. Can certain kinds of screen time help babies learn?

To find some answers, I employed the help of my 1-year-old daughter, Eva. She's still a wobbly walker and the sum total of her speaking skills sound like gibberish. But she has no problem activating Siri, the virtual assistant on my iPhone. Her 16-month-old friend, Lily, is even savvier with the gadgets.

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Theater
11:00 am
Mon October 28, 2013

Condola Rashad: A Fresh Face To The Classic 'Juliet'

Condola Rashad stars opposite Orlando Bloom in the new Broadway production of Romeo & Juliet.
Carol Rosegg

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 1:02 pm

Many people might know Condola Rashad as the daughter of actress Phylicia Rashad, who played Claire Huxtable on The Cosby Show, and NFL sportscaster Ahmad Rashad. The 26-year-old got Tony Award nominations for her performances in Stick Fly and The Trip to Bountiful. Now she takes on her first lead role on Broadway in the new production of Romeo & Juliet. Her Romeo is Orlando Bloom of Lord of the Rings fame.

Condola Rashad spoke with Tell Me More guest host Celeste Headlee about making the iconic role her own.

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Television
11:00 am
Mon October 28, 2013

Sean Combs' Revolt TV: Puff Daddy Magic?

Hip-hop mogul Sean Combs has launched his own channel for cable. Revolt TV aims to bring a new generation - and its love of social media - to music television. Guest host Celeste Headlee discusses the venture with NPR television correspondent and critic Eric Deggans.

Technology
11:00 am
Mon October 28, 2013

Putting The Spotlight On Blacks In Tech

Pitch Mixer founder Ayori Selassie speaking at an entrepreneur forum.
Tamara Orozco

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 2:14 pm

Representatives from Historically Black Colleges and Universities are meeting in Stanford this week to talk about African Americans in the tech world.

According to a recent study by the National Science Foundation, Black men and women made up 5 percent of scientists and engineers working in their field in 2010.

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National Security
11:00 am
Mon October 28, 2013

International Bugging: Why The U.S. Snoops

News organizations in France, Germany and Spain have reported wide-spread monitoring by the National Security Agency in their countries. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with journalists from Der Spiegel and Le Figaro, about the recent revelations.

The Two-Way
7:28 am
Mon October 28, 2013

All You Need To Know About The All Tied Up World Series

Kolten Wong of the St. Louis Cardinals slumps as Boston Red Sox first baseman Mike Napoli celebrates Sunday night. Wong was picked off at first base to end the game and the Cardinals' hopes of winning. Boston's 4-2 victory means the World Series is tied at 2-2.
Elsa Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 6:39 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Tom Goldman reports on Sunday's World Series game

The score Sunday night was:

Boston Red Sox 4; St. Louis Cardinals 2.

Which means the World Series is:

Tied at two games apiece.

The big moment Sunday:

Came in the sixth inning, when Boston outfielder Jonny Gomes hit a three-run homer.

The big mistake:

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Strange News
5:13 am
Mon October 28, 2013

What Employees Will Say To Get A Sick Day

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 7:00 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Employers do fire workers who use fake excuses to call in sick, but there are still plenty of examples of this adult version of The Dog Ate My Homework, according to a new study released by the website CareerBuilder. Nearly a third of employees reported they've called in sick when they weren't really. Among the imaginative medical excuses: losing false teeth out of the car window or extreme grumpiness from quitting smoking. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

It's All Politics
4:22 am
Mon October 28, 2013

A Churchill 'Quote' That U.S. Politicians Will Never Surrender

Winston Churchill opens the new headquarters of a Royal Auxiliary Air Force squadron at Croydon in 1948.
Central Press/Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 7:28 am

This week, Congress dedicates a new bust of Winston Churchill in the Capitol's Statuary Hall. The sculpture is meant to honor the British statesman's legacy of determination and resolve.

It's also a salute to Churchill's friendship with the United States — summed up in an oft-quoted line that Maine Sen. Angus King used during the recent congressional debt-ceiling debate.

As King put it: "Winston Churchill once famously observed that Americans will always do the right thing, only after they have tried everything else."

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Strange News
4:11 am
Mon October 28, 2013

New Venezuelan Ministry Focuses On 'Supreme Social Happiness'

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 7:00 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro has not had a great year. After a winning a disputed election, he faces inflation near 50 percent. Supplies of basic goods like toilet paper have run low. But now Maduro is acting. He created a new Vice Ministry of Supreme Social Happiness. It's supposed to coordinate services for the poor. We do not know of the Happiness Ministry will work but it has given a practical benefit, causing people to laugh.

NPR Story
4:05 am
Mon October 28, 2013

Spying Allegations Rock U.S.-German Relations

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 7:00 am

German officials are scrambling to gather more information and U.S. officials are assessing diplomatic options in the wake of claims that the U.S. National Security Agency has been monitoring German Chancellor Angela Merkel's cellphone for more than a decade. Renee Montagne talks to Tim Naftali of the New America Foundation about America's history of spying and what this recent news means for the U.S. relationship with its European allies.

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