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Politics
4:57 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Boehner Picks Cathy McMorris Rodgers For GOP Rebuttal

Rep. Cathy McMorris-Rodgers, R-Wash., walks to a Sept. 2013 classified, members-only briefing on Syria in Washington.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 9:16 am

Tuesday night is the State of the Union Address — the biggest opportunity President Obama gets all year to speak to the American people about his priorities. There's also another speech that night — the GOP response. On Thursday, House Speaker John Boehner announced Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers from Washington State would deliver the official rebuttal.

Around the Nation
4:57 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Drinking Water Not Tested For Tens Of Thousands Of Chemicals

Al Jones of the West Virginia Department of General Services tests water as he flushes faucets and opens a rest room at the State Capitol in Charleston, W. Va., on Jan. 13, four days after a chemical spill into the Elk River. It wasn't until Jan. 21 that state officials were told by Freedom Industries that a second contaminant had also entered the river.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 7:48 pm

The fact that a second contaminant in West Virginia's drinking water eluded detection for nearly two weeks — despite intense testing of the water — reveals an important truth about how companies test drinking water: In most cases, they only find the contaminants they're looking for.

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The Edge
6:22 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

A Baby Didn't Bump These Moms Out Of Competition

Malaysian shooting athlete Nur Suryani Taibi was eight months pregnant in 2012 as she prepared for the Summer Olympics in London.
Rebecca Blackwell AP

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 4:32 pm

Let's be clear: Olympians handle the physical challenges of childbirth differently than most of the rest of us.

Aretha Thurmond is a discus thrower who'd already competed in two Olympics when she went to the hospital in labor.

"So I get there and they're like, 'Yeah, whatever, you're 4 centimeters dilated. Go walk around the hospital and come back,' " she says.

Thurmond's hospital was part of a university, so she headed straight for its track, where she power-walked for the next two hours. Then the school's discus throwers came out.

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Economy
5:21 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Study: Upward Mobility No Tougher In U.S. Than Two Decades Ago

The study did reveal widespread disparity in upward mobility based on geography. For those hoping to climb the economic ladder, San Francisco is one of the best places to live, the study found.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 4:32 pm

A new study finds that contrary to widespread belief, it's no harder to climb the economic ladder in the United States today than it was 20 years ago.

But the study did find that moving up that ladder is still a lot more difficult in the U.S. than in other developed countries.

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Code Switch
4:00 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Raised In The U.S. And Coming Out To Immigrant Parents

Camila Fierro and her girlfriend, Erica Brien.
Jasmine Garsd NPR

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 4:32 pm

Editor's Note: This week Code Switch has been bringing you a series of stories prompted by a poll from NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health. And one of the findings that stood out was a striking difference between Latinos born and raised in the U.S. and immigrants when it comes to the degree of openness when it comes to talking about sexual orientation.

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All Tech Considered
4:00 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Retailers Can Wait To Tell You Your Card Data Have Been Compromised

The security breaches at Target and Neiman Marcus have raised questions over how quickly companies are required to disclose that customer information was hacked.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 4:32 pm

You might think that retailers have to let you know right away if they get hacked and someone steals your account information.

But recent disclosures by Target and Neiman Marcus that their networks were hacked, and data about their consumers were stolen, have raised questions about how quickly merchants need to alert their customers.

In the case of Neiman Marcus, the company may have had evidence of a breach as far back as July. But the law is a bit murky on just how quickly companies need to let customers know.

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Economy
4:00 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

What Do Americans Think About Income Inequality?

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 4:32 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And as we just heard from Jim, economic mobility may not have changed much in the last 20 years, but income inequality has skyrocketed. More on the latter now from Michael Dimock, vice president of research at the Pew Research Center. Pew has a new survey out, asking Americans what they think about income inequality.

Michael Dimock, welcome once again.

MICHAEL DIMOCK: Thanks for having me.

SIEGEL: And first finding is Americans say there is growing income inequality, yes?

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NPR Story
3:41 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Color Used In Many Sodas Contains Potential Carcinogen

A recent article in Consumer Reports says that the caramel color used to make most sodas brown, contains a potential carcinogen. One of the the worst offenders is the diet brand Pepsi One. (Brandon Warren/Flickr)

It may not be news that soda is unhealthy, but today, Consumer Reports is saying that in addition to the sugar and empty calories most soda consumers may worry about, they also should be concerned about the color of the soda.

Tests show that the caramel color used to make most sodas brown, contains a potential carcinogen, and one of the the worst offenders is the diet brand Pepsi One.

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NPR Story
3:41 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

'Sustainability' Is Big In Food Retail, But Hard To Prove

Whole Foods already employs a labeling system to identify the sustainability ratings of its seafood. The company plans to introduce a similar system for flowers and produce later this year. (Quim Gil/Flickr)

When you head to the supermarket, you have a lot of choices these days. You can choose from any number of brands, prices and labels. You can go organic, buy local, make sure your food is antibiotic free. And now you can add “sustainable” to the grocery list.

Retailers and restaurants like Whole Foods, Chipotle and Walmart are all providing information to consumers about how “sustainably” some of their products were produced. But it’s hard to know just what “sustainably” means and how to judge whether food was produced in a “sustainable” way.

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NPR Story
3:41 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

How China's Web Traffic Wound Up In Wyoming

Pictured is the building in Cheyenne, Wyo., registered to the Internet address that received the Chinese web traffic. (Google Streetview)

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 6:52 am

Half a billion Internet users in China were blocked from the Internet for nearly eight hours on Tuesday when China’s vast “firewall,” or censorship technologies, accidentally routed most of the country’s web traffic to an Internet address registered to a company in Cheyenne, Wyoming.

While the physical location of the servers receiving the traffic isn’t clear, the massive loss of Internet service may be the biggest crash in the Internet’s history.

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