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Sweetness And Light
4:23 am
Wed January 22, 2014

In Ice Skating's Biggest Story, The Media Were Poor Sports

Tonya Harding and Nancy Kerrigan at the 1992 U.S. Figure Skating Championships in Orlando, Fla.
Phil Sandlin AP

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 8:51 am

It's difficult to understand why certain athletes are harshly singled out by the media, but one of the most baffling examples has to be the criticism displayed toward figure skater Nancy Kerrigan after she was clubbed in the leg at a practice session just weeks before the 1994 Olympics.

The ex-husband of another member of the U.S. women's team, Tonya Harding, was convicted of arranging the attack. Harding herself was fined and banned from the sport.

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Around the Nation
4:41 pm
Tue January 21, 2014

Storm And Stress Visit The East Coast

Originally published on Tue January 21, 2014 6:55 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

A fast-moving winter storm is barreling across the mid-Atlantic and up the East Coast today. Some places are expecting up to a foot of snow. The blizzard conditions from Virginia to Massachusetts will be followed by bitterly cold temperatures. NPR's Allison Keyes reports.

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Sports
4:40 pm
Tue January 21, 2014

Aerial Skiing Is A Game Of Skill — And Strategy

Emily Cook trains in aerials for the Visa Freestyle International in Park City, Utah, last February.
Matthew Stockman Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 21, 2014 7:08 pm

During the Winter Olympics, seeing an aerial skier perform is unforgettable.

It's like gymnastics in the air. And, like gymnasts, aerial skiers get points for doing a harder routine and for sticking the landing. But there's a crucial difference between the two sports.

In the final few rounds of aerials, you can't use the same trick twice. Sometimes, after seeing what the athletes before you have done, you have to change which moves you'll use in the very last seconds.

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It's All Politics
4:40 pm
Tue January 21, 2014

Finding Common Interests, Obama And The Pope Set A Date

Pope Francis waves to faithful during the Angelus prayer from his studio overlooking St. Peter's Square at the Vatican on Sunday. President Obama will meet with the pope for the first time in March.
Alessandra Tarantino AP

Originally published on Tue January 21, 2014 7:32 pm

President Obama plans to meet this spring with Pope Francis.

On Tuesday, a White House spokesman announced the president will visit the Vatican as part of European trip in March. The president is said to be looking forward to talking with the pope about their "shared commitment to fighting poverty" and income inequality.

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NPR Story
3:34 pm
Tue January 21, 2014

The Kings Of Ice Castles Come To New Hampshire

Cory Livingood stands in a potential ice throne location. (Sean Hurley/NHPR)

Utah has one. So does Colorado. And now New Hampshire has one, too: Its very own ice castle.

The frozen structure is now open to the public at Loon Mountain in north central New Hampshire.

It’s taken mother nature and 20 workers about a month to turn tons of homemade icicles into a glacial maze of frozen caverns and clear blue coliseums.

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NPR Story
3:34 pm
Tue January 21, 2014

One Year Later: Reflections On An Inaugural Poem

President Barack Obama and Richard Blanco look at a framed copy of "One Today," in the Oval Office, May 20, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

When Richard Blanco was tapped last year to write the inaugural poem at the ceremony for President Obama’s second term, he was more than surprised. The Latino gay poet was given three weeks to write and submit three poems.

Blanco says the poem chosen for the big day, “One Day,” was not his favorite. We hear the one that was: “Mother Country.”

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NPR Story
3:34 pm
Tue January 21, 2014

Pandora And Performance Rights Organization In Court Over Music Fees

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 7:32 am

Pandora is facing off with the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) in federal court today to determine how much money the online radio giant should pay for the use of their compositions.

Pandora pays 4.3 percent of its revenues to ASCAP publishers and songwriters. It pays about half its revenue to record labels and performers. The decision could have an impact on the evolving digital music industry.

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Music Interviews
2:10 pm
Tue January 21, 2014

Schubert's 'Winterreise' Paints Bleak Landscape For Bill T. Jones

Choreographer Bill T. Jones at an appearance earlier this year.
Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 21, 2014 6:55 pm

As snowstorms hit the country today, All Things Considered revisits a vivid story that choreographer and dancer Bill T. Jones shared about one winter song. It originally aired Dec. 13, 2011.

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Movie Interviews
12:11 pm
Tue January 21, 2014

Phoenix To Self: 'Why Am I Talking About This? ... Joaquin, Shut Up'

Joaquin Phoenix's Her character, Theodore, has a job writing intimate — and sometimes erotic — cards and letters on behalf of other people.
Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 4:56 pm

Joaquin Phoenix started his acting career in 1982, when he was about 8, on an episode of the TV series Seven Brides For Seven Brothers. (His brother, the late River Phoenix, was a regular in the series.) He tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that he still vividly remembers his first time on a set.

"I remember feeling like I was buzzing, like my whole body was vibrating, because it was just so exciting to experience this thing that wasn't real but at moments felt like it was real," he says. "It's basically the feeling that I've been chasing ever since."

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U.S.
11:00 am
Tue January 21, 2014

Why A 'White Guy' Bought A House In Detroit For $500

Originally published on Tue January 21, 2014 12:57 pm

When Drew Philp bought a house in Detroit for $500, he thought it would take a lot of work to make it livable. But as he was fixing it up, he learned a lot about Detroit and rebuilding a city. He tells guest host Celeste Headlee about the experience.

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