Pages

NPR Story
2:21 pm
Tue December 3, 2013

Did Silicon Valley Help The NSA Spy?

Originally published on Tue December 3, 2013 3:19 pm

Georgetown University professor Abraham Newman argues that business practices at the big technology companies have helped the National Security Agency gather consumers’ personal data in the U.S. and abroad.

Technology companies have reacted sharply to revelations of N.S.A. spying on their customers’ data. Google said, “We are outraged at the lengths to which the government seems to have gone to intercept data from our private fiber networks, and it underscores the need for urgent reform.”

Read more
NPR Story
2:21 pm
Tue December 3, 2013

'Giving Tuesday' Follows Record-Breaking Cyber Monday

(givingtuesday.org)

Originally published on Tue December 3, 2013 3:19 pm

Cyber Monday, the Super Bowl of online sales, broke all records this year, with sales up 19 percent over last year.

Mobile traffic accounted for 13 percent of total site visits, and sales are projected to reach $2 billion for desktop online sales, according to comScore.

But the bonanza isn’t over. Today is “Giving Tuesday.” The movement to create a national day of giving started last year, raising $10 million dollars for more than 2,500 charities nationwide.

Read more
Parallels
1:28 pm
Tue December 3, 2013

The High Price Egyptians Pay For Opposing Their Rulers

Supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood run from tear gas during clashes with riot police near Cairo's Rabaa al-Adawiya square on Nov. 22.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue December 3, 2013 6:11 pm

Mohamed Yousef is a tall, handsome practitioner of kung fu. In fact, he's an Egyptian champion who recently won an international competition.

But a month ago, when he collected his gold medal at the championship in Russia, he posed for a picture after putting on a yellow T-shirt with a hand holding up four fingers.

That's the symbol of Rabaa al-Adawiya, the Cairo square where Egyptian security forces opened fire in August on supporters of ousted Islamist President Mohammed Morsi. Hundreds were killed, including seven of Yousef's friends.

Read more
Author Interviews
12:25 pm
Tue December 3, 2013

Underground Cities And 'Ghost' Miners: What Some People Do For Gold

The price of gold rose dramatically after Lehman Brothers collapsed in 2008.
David Paul Morris Getty Images

Originally published on Tue December 3, 2013 1:41 pm

Gold is assumed to have eternal, inherent value, but what makes it valuable? And what determines its value now that it's no longer the basis of our currency? In the book Gold: The Race for the World's Most Seductive Metal, journalist Matthew Hart examines the new gold rush driven by investors. He travels to gold mines — including the Mponeng mine in South Africa, where he descended into the deepest man-made hole on Earth — and investigates why gold and crime sometimes go hand in hand.

Read more
Author Interviews
12:25 pm
Tue December 3, 2013

Ted Williams: A Perfectionist Ballplayer With Many Demons

Ted Williams, pictured here in 1941, was deeply marked by his parents' absence while he and his brother were growing up.
AP

Originally published on Tue December 3, 2013 1:16 pm

There are great ballplayers, and then there's Ted Williams. In a 22-year career, Williams accomplished things that give him a legitimate claim to being the greatest hitter who ever lived; but he was also a tormented soul who hurt a lot of people, including himself.

Read more
NPR Story
11:09 am
Tue December 3, 2013

Toy Gender Wars: Team Pink Or Team Blue?

'Tis the season! Tell Me More's parenting roundtable weighs in on navigating toy shelves this year. Are gender neutral toys the best way to go? And is the pink presidential Barbie politically correct or just a hot mess? Host Michel Martin talks toys with parents Sarah Maizes, Neal Hoffman and Jamila Bey.

NPR Story
11:09 am
Tue December 3, 2013

Sylvia Porter: Right On The Money

Tracy Lucht is author of a new biography, Sylvia Porter: America's Original Personal Finance Columnist.
Courtesy of the author

Originally published on Tue December 3, 2013 1:57 pm

Although she's little-remembered today, personal finance columnist Sylvia Porter was one of the best-known and most admired women in 1950s America. A nationally syndicated newspaper columnist, she also wrote books, appeared on TV shows such as Meet the Press and advised presidents. Her monthly column in the Ladies Home Journal broke ground by encouraging women to control their own finances.

Read more
NPR Story
11:09 am
Tue December 3, 2013

The Season Of Giving... And Getting Scammed?

It's the season of giving, but scammers are trying to take as much as they can this holiday season. Host Michel Martin speaks with Sheryl Harris, consumer columnist for The Plain Dealer, about avoiding seasonal scams.

NPR Story
11:09 am
Tue December 3, 2013

Immigration Activists Push For Reform With Water-Only Diet

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later this hour, we're going to spend some time talking about money management in the season of giving. We'll talk about some of the scams that always seem to crop up at this time of year, and we'll talk about how you can spot them and avoid them.

Read more
Religion
6:15 am
Tue December 3, 2013

Pope Francis Reveals He Once Worked As A Bouncer

Originally published on Tue December 3, 2013 5:02 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Pages