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Law
2:34 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Is It Legal For Undocumented Immigrant To Practice Law?

Sergio Garcia speaks at The Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA) news conference on Aug. 27. Garcia, 36, is a law school graduate who passed California's bar examination, but he's living in the United States illegally. California State Bar officials have not issued him a lawyer's license because of his immigration status.
Nick Ut AP

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 2:44 pm

On Wednesday, the California Supreme Court holds oral arguments in a case that will determine whether Sergio Garcia, an undocumented immigrant, can become a licensed attorney.

The case has drawn attention from legal groups across the country and comes amid the larger national fight over immigration reform.

On the side of Garcia are the State Bar of California and the California attorney general. Opposing his admission to the bar is the Justice Department, among others.

'This Is The Country I Know'

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The Salt
2:05 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Small Farmers In New England Fear New Food Safety Rules

Joe Buley owns Screamin' Ridge Farm in Montpelier, Vt. He says the FDA's new food safety rules threaten the viability of small New England farm operations like his. Here, Buley harvests cucumbers.
Emily Corwin

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 5:42 am

Back in January, the Food and Drug Administration issued two proposed food safety rules to prevent tainted food from entering the food supply.

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All Tech Considered
2:05 am
Wed September 4, 2013

For Biographers, The Past Is An Open (Electronic) Book

Digital ephemera can capture things that don't appear in official accounts of events — but the material's in danger of disappearing if it's in obsolete formats.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 12:00 pm

For centuries, biographers have relied on letters to bring historical figures to life, whether Gandhi or Catherine the Great. But as people switch from writing on paper to documenting their lives electronically, biographers are encountering new benefits — and new challenges.

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Sweetness And Light
1:15 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Why Keep Athletes Eligible But Uneducated?

Ersin Kisacik iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 3:31 pm

Each football season brings exciting plays and game heroes, but Frank Deford says the real heroes are often overlooked.

As another school year and college football season gets underway, Deford looks at the frustrations and challenges facing educators to keep student athletes eligible.

Click on the audio link above to hear Deford's take on this issue.

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Business
4:28 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Spirit Airlines Sees Business Take Off With Raunchy Ads

Spirit Airlines has gotten notice — and criticism — for its racy ads.
Courtesy of Spirit Airlines

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 4:22 pm

South Florida-based Spirit Airlines is known for being cheap. It boasts "ultralow" base fares and then charges for items such as carry-on luggage or printing out your boarding pass at the airport.

That thrift carries over to Spirit's advertising. Even compared with other low-cost airlines, Spirit spends almost nothing on ads. And yet the company makes a surprising splash with its campaigns. A visit to Spirit headquarters reveals the secrets of its marketing.

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Around the Nation
3:24 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

California Lawmakers Target Boy Scouts' Tax-Exempt Status

Boy Scouts attend a Memorial Day event in Los Angeles in May. A bill under consideration by the California Legislature would take away the tax-exempt status of the Boy Scouts of America.
Jonathan Alcorn Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 6:44 pm

Beginning next year, the Boy Scouts of America will allow openly gay youth to join as members. But the policy change doesn't go far enough for Democratic lawmakers in California. They're on the verge of passing a bill that would strip tax breaks for the Boy Scouts and any other group that discriminates against gay, lesbian or transgender members.

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Business
3:23 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

New Carpet Factories Help Cushion Blows From Recession Losses

Fibers are rolled into spools at the Engineered Floors carpet plant in Dalton, Ga.
Kathy Lohr NPR

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 4:22 pm

Known as the "Carpet Capital of the World," Dalton, Ga., has struggled and lost 17,000 manufacturing jobs over the past decade.

But now, Engineered Floors is investing $450 million in two new manufacturing facilities and a distribution center in the area. The Dalton expansion is part of a resurgence in manufacturing in Georgia and it reflects an optimistic outlook for manufacturing across the Southeast.

Something Different, Something New

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NPR Story
3:23 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Jersey Shore Feels Summertime Blues After Sandy

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 4:04 pm

Labor Day weekend marks the close of the official summer season on the Jersey Shore. But for some towns, it's like the summer never really began. Destruction from Hurricane Sandy last October kept tourists away. Some towns are still struggling to rebuild. Businesses that rely on seasonal visitors for much of their yearly take are wondering if they'll be around next year.

World Cafe
1:11 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Houndmouth On World Cafe

Houndmouth.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 1:31 pm

Houndmouth is a rootsy rock band from New Albany, Ind., right across the river from Louisville. In an age of loops, samples and all things digital, Houndmouth is a refreshingly straightforward rock band with guitars, B-3 and all members singing in harmony.

The group recently released its debut album, From the Hills Below the City. Hear Houndmouth perform four of its songs on this installment of World Cafe.

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All Tech Considered
11:51 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Beyond The Shadows: Apple's iOS 7 Is All About The Screen

Craig Federighi, senior vice president of software engineering at Apple, discusses features of the new iOS 7 during the keynote address of the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference on June 10 in San Francisco.
Eric Risberg AP

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 2:55 pm

At some point in the coming weeks, users of Apple iPhones and iPads will wake up to an alert that there is a new version of the company's mobile operating system, known as iOS, for them to install.

If users follow historical patterns, within a few days of the launch of iOS 7, almost all of them will install the updated software and, just like that, more than 500 million phones and tablets will be made new. Never before has a technology industry launch come close to matching the scale and speed of this switch.

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