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Television
12:31 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

'Dancing On The Edge' Is Fun For Both The Eyes And The Ears

Set in London in the early 1930s, Dancing on the Edge is a five-part miniseries about a black jazz band trying to crack the dance halls and radio playlists. Made for BBC-2, the episodes will air starting Saturday night on the Starz cable network.
Starz

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 3:52 pm

One of my most enjoyable parts of being a critic is steering people toward something so good, but so relatively obscure, that they might never have checked it out unless they'd been nudged in that direction. My personal best example of that, ever, was the imported BBC miniseries The Singing Detective, by Dennis Potter, about 25 years ago.

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Author Interviews
12:31 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

Billy Crystal Finds Fun In Growing Old (But Still Can't Find His Keys)

Courtesy of Henry Holt and Co.

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 2:48 pm

Billy Crystal isn't happy about turning 65, but at least he's finding a way to laugh about it. His new memoir — Still Foolin' 'Em: Where I've Been, Where I'm Going, and Where the Hell Are My Keys? — is on the best-seller list, and he'll be back on Broadway in November.

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Author Interviews
11:41 am
Thu October 17, 2013

Jack London Believed 'Function Of Man Is To Live, Not To Exist'

Jack London's 1903 The Call of the Wild was a sensation — it sold one million copies and made London the most popular American writer of his generation. He's shown above in 1916, shortly before his death at age 40.
AP

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 4:54 pm

A literary critic once remarked, "The greatest story Jack London ever wrote was the story he lived." In his brief life, London sought adventure in the far corners of the world, from the frozen Yukon to the South Pacific, writing gripping tales of survival based on his experiences — including The Call of the Wild, White Fang and The Sea Wolf.

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Movies
11:11 am
Thu October 17, 2013

Tough Love And Lessons From 'American Promise' Film

The black male achievement gap has always been a hot-button topic. But a new film - 13 years in the making - attempts to address that issue by chronicling the experiences of two black boys as they navigate a prestigious private school. Host Michel Martin speaks with filmmakers and parents, Joe Brewster and Michele Stephenson, and their son Idris Brewster, about the film American Promise.

U.S.
11:11 am
Thu October 17, 2013

Federal Employees Return To Work

Yesterday Congress brought the country back from the brink of defaulting on its debt. Host Michel Martin talks to Joe Davidson of The Washington Post about how federal workers will bring the government back to life.

Around the Nation
11:11 am
Thu October 17, 2013

Regional Roundtable: News From Outside The Beltway

Host Michel Martin continues her conversation with regional newspaper editors on what news is grabbing their readers' attention.

Politics
11:11 am
Thu October 17, 2013

Post Shutdown, Many Reassessing Government's Role

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 9:19 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Well, it's finally over for now. This is President Obama speaking earlier today.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: Well, last night, I signed legislation to reopen our government and pay America's bills because Democrats and responsible Republicans came together. The first government shutdown in 17 years is now over.

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NPR Story
9:23 am
Thu October 17, 2013

How Financial Markets View Fiscal Deal

For a glimpse of how financial markets may view the deal by Congress to reopen the federal government and raise the debt ceiling, Renee Montagne speaks to HSBC's chief U.S. economist Kevin Logan.

Europe
6:55 am
Thu October 17, 2013

Businessman Retaliates Against Ice Cream Truck Driver

Originally published on Thu October 17, 2013 9:23 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Money cannot always buy you peace and quiet. A Swedish newspaper reports on a prominent businessman, Percy Nilsson, owner a hockey team. The 71-year-old confessed he'd drilled holes in the tires of an ice cream truck. Mr. Nilsson said he was infuriated by the teenage driver blowing the horn. He says I want to start a debate about ice cream truck noise. The driver admits to blowing the horn almost 100 times per hour. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Europe
6:18 am
Thu October 17, 2013

Who Was First To Enjoy Frog Legs, France Or England?

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 8:44 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

It would be hard to be more French than frogs' legs, but an archeological dig in Southwest England has revealed that frogs' legs were actually enjoyed by the English first, 8,000 years before they appeared across the channel.

This will be a contentious claim, given the long rivalry between the countries. While the British may have eaten frogs' legs first, there's still hope for the French that they were the first to gently saute them in garlic and butter.

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