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5:44 pm
Sat June 29, 2013

Back On The Ground, Nik Wallenda Dreams Up His Next Walk

Nik Wallenda practices walking across a wire in Sarasota, Fla., last week.
Chris O'Meara AP

Originally published on Sat June 29, 2013 6:07 pm

Daredevil Nik Wallenda of the famous "Flying Wallendas" family successfully walked on a 2-inch-thick cable across a 1,500-foot gorge near the Grand Canyon last week — without a net.

Back on solid ground, Wallenda says of course he has butterflies, but he doesn't get dizzy and there's no fear. He speaks with weekends on All Things Considered host Jacki Lyden about his latest death-defying walk on the high wire.


Interview Highlights

On training for the Grand Canyon

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Monkey See
4:50 pm
Sat June 29, 2013

Girls' Legos Are A Hit, But Why Do Girls Need Special Legos?

Olivia also has a treehouse.
Lego

Originally published on Sat June 29, 2013 8:55 pm

Two years ago, in 2011, 90 percent of Lego's consumers were boys. A tough statistic to swallow for those of us who grew up playing with Lego's gender-neutral buckets of bricks. But the statistic came straight from Lego, which was then focused on boys with franchised sets based on properties like Star Wars and The Avengers after weathering a disastrous period in the 1990s that left the company on the brink of collapse.

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Sports
4:46 pm
Sat June 29, 2013

'I Am A Gay High School Basketball Coach'

Anthony Nicodemo is head basketball coach at Saunders High School in Yonkers, N.Y.
Courtesy of MSG Varsity

Originally published on Sun June 30, 2013 4:03 pm

When pro basketball player Jason Collins announced earlier this year that he was gay, Anthony Nicodemo was listening.

Nicodemo is the head basketball coach at Saunders High School in Yonkers, N.Y. At great risk to his cherished career, he recently decided to come out to his team.

"I said, 'You know, I always try to preach to you guys about being yourself and really being honest and open,' " Nicodemo recounts his story to NPR's Jacki Lyden.

"'I haven't been honest with you guys. I haven't been honest with a lot of people. I am a gay high school basketball coach.' "

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Movies
4:08 pm
Sat June 29, 2013

Rescued, Hitchcock's Silent Films Flicker Anew

The Ring. That and eight more of the master's early silent features have restored by the British Film Institute." href="/post/rescued-hitchcocks-silent-films-flicker-anew" class="noexit lightbox">
Carl Brisson stars as sideshow boxer "One Round Jack" in Alfred Hitchcock's 1927 film The Ring. That and eight more of the master's early silent features have restored by the British Film Institute.
Rialto Pictures/BFI

Originally published on Sat June 29, 2013 6:07 pm

Alfred Hitchcock's early silent films have resurfaced in what's being called the single biggest restoration project in the history of the British Film Institute, and now "The Hitchcock 9" are touring the U.S. this summer.

Hitchcock is best known for his Hollywood suspense films of the post-war era, like Psycho and Vertigo. But the director was born in England and began his directing career there during the silent era. In fact, he loved both seeing and making silent films.

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Music Interviews
4:08 pm
Sat June 29, 2013

La Vida Bohème: Dance Rockers Harness Chaos And Conflict

La Vida Bohème's second album, Sera, draws upon a handful of musical influences, from disco to reggae.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat June 29, 2013 6:07 pm

Henry D'Arthenay grew up in Caracas, Venezuela — a country currently rife with political conflict. As lead singer of the Venezuelan alt-rock band La Vida Bohème, D'Arthenay used that chaos for fuel in constructing the band's latest album, Será, which was released in April.

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NPR Story
4:08 pm
Sat June 29, 2013

Measuring The African-American Financial Divide

Originally published on Sat June 29, 2013 6:07 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

We continue this week to dig into the findings of our poll of African-American communities and how black Americans rate many aspects of their lives. We conducted the poll with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health.

While the gap between the well-off and poor in the U.S. has stretched wide in recent years, we found that black Americans describe their financial divide as a nearly 50-50 split, and it affects how they view their world. NPR's Cheryl Corley reports.

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Music
11:54 am
Sat June 29, 2013

Sasha Dobson's Journey Out Of Jazz And Into Songwriting

Formerly a scat singer, Sasha Dobson has just released her first solo album of original songs, Aquarius.
L. Arthi Krishnaswami Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat June 29, 2013 2:44 pm

Smith Dobson was one of the most sought-after pianists of the Bay Area when he died in a car crash in 2001. He was part of a musical family — his wife, Gail, a jazz singer; his son a drummer. His daughter, Sasha Dobson, was a scat singer who followed the family's jazz muse until her dad's tragic death.

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NPR Story
10:41 am
Sat June 29, 2013

Egyptian Protests Grow Violent

Originally published on Sat June 29, 2013 2:44 pm

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

President Obama may be in South Africa but his attention is also on Egypt. Mr. Obama said today, he's concerned about political protests and clashes between supporters and opponents of President Mohamed Morsi which have left at least three people dead, including one American.

Joining us now is NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson from Cairo. Thanks for joining us, Soraya.

SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, BYLINE: You're welcome.

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Books News & Features
8:05 am
Sat June 29, 2013

'Empire Falls' Author Richard Russo Gives E-Publishing A Try

Originally published on Sat June 29, 2013 2:44 pm

Richard Russo, the writer who won the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for his book Empire Falls, published a new novel six months ago. If you're wondering how you missed it, it might be because Russo chose not to publish with a traditional publisher. There are no hardcover or paperback copies of Nate in Venice -- it's only available by subscription on Byliner, a digital publishing service, where you can only read it on an e-reader, phone or tablet.

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Parallels
8:05 am
Sat June 29, 2013

War Correspondent's Unflinching 'Diary Of A Bad Year'

A Syrian woman is evacuated after being wounded in shelling by regime forces in the Shaar neighborhood of the northern Syrian city of Aleppo, on Oct. 13, 2012.
Fabio Bucciarelli AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 10:50 pm

  • Listen to Kelly McEvers' Hourlong Documentary

NPR's Kelly McEvers struggled with intense, unexpected emotions during the Arab Spring, when friends were being kidnapped and worse. It made her wonder, why do otherwise intelligent people risk their lives to report on conflicts?

In early 2011, I started seeing things in slow motion. I cried unpredictably. It was the time of the Arab uprisings. Colleagues and friends were getting kidnapped. Some were getting killed.

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