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Around the Nation
3:36 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Miss., Texas Won't Offer VA Benefits To Same-Sex Partners

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 4:22 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

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Around the Nation
3:36 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Ohio Kidnapper Ariel Castro Commits Suicide In Prison

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 4:22 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Just months after Amanda Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight escaped from years of captivity in a house in Cleveland, their captor is dead. Ariel Castro was found hanging in his prison cell last night. His death has now been ruled a suicide. From member station WCPN, Nick Castele reports.

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World Cafe
2:01 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Natalia Clavier On World Cafe

Natalia Clavier.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 1:30 pm

There was never any doubt that Argentine vocalist Natalia Clavier could sing. She's been proving that for years, performing jazz and serving as the anonymous voice on hundreds of techno and dance songs, most recorded when she lived in Barcelona after moving there from Buenos Aires. For years, she's also been the go-to live voice for Thievery Corporation, and she remains part of its live act.

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World Cafe
2:01 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Youth Lagoon On World Cafe

Youth Lagoon performs live at NPR Music's SXSW showcase in March 2013.
Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 1:30 pm

Youth Lagoon is the work of Boise, Idaho's Trevor Powers. The title of his first album, 2011's The Year of Hibernation, captures what was going on: a solo bedroom project that explored the theme of emerging from isolation. It sounded great, and the positive response got Powers out of the bedroom and on the road for a year.

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Planet Money
1:07 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

The Nobel Laureate Who Figured Out How To Deal With Annoying People

"I've been wrong so often I don't find it extraordinary at all," Ronald Coase told us last year.
University of Chicago

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 4:22 pm

Update, Sept. 4: We added the audio for David Kestenbaum's radio obituary of Ronald Coase.

If you created the world as a simple economic thought experiment, companies wouldn't exist. Instead, everybody would work for themselves, and they'd be constantly selling their labor (or the fruits of their labor, or use of their tools, or whatever) to the highest bidder. Wages would rise and fall every day (every hour! every second!) depending on supply and demand. That's how the market works, after all.

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Music News
12:57 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Everybody Loves John Fogerty

John Fogerty teams up with Brad Paisley, whom he calls one of the greatest guitarists alive, in "Hot Rod Heart" on his new album, Wrote a Song for Everyone.
Benjamin Enos Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 4:22 pm

Imagine you wrote some of the most enduring songs in 1960s rock, but then got so mired in legal and financial issues with those same songs that you felt you couldn't play them.

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Book Reviews
12:30 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

From McDermott, An Extraordinary Story Of An Ordinary 'Someone'

The main character of Alice McDermott's Someone grew up in 1920s and '30s New York.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 2:27 pm

Endurance, going the distance, sucking up the solitude and the brine: I'm not talking about the glorious Diana Nyad and her instantly historic swim from Cuba to Key West, but of the ordinary heroine whose life is the subject of Alice McDermott's latest novel, Someone. "Ordinary" is a word that's used a lot to describe McDermott's characters, mostly Irish and working class, mostly un-heroic in any splashy way.

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Parallels
12:14 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

'We Are Next': Greek Jews Fear Rise Of Far-Right Party

Mois Yussuroum, a 94-year-old retired dentist, fought the Nazis as part of the Greek resistance during World War II. "Of the 650 Greek Jews who fought in the resistance, I'm the only one still alive," he says.
Joanna Kakissis/NPR

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 4:22 pm

No one has ever doubted Mois Yussuroum's patriotism. As part of the Greek resistance during World War II, he fought Benito Mussolini's fascist army and then the Nazis.

"The other resistance fighters didn't know I was Jewish," he says, since he used the name "Yiorgos Gazis" in case he was captured. "But my superiors did know, and they gave me many responsibilities, including making me a garrison commander."

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U.S.
12:04 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Program Fights Gun Violence Bravado With 'Story Of Suffering'

Dr. Amy Goldberg explains the medical treatment Adams received after he was shot. Part of her demonstration involves placing stickers on a student volunteer to mark bullet entry and exit points.
Courtesy Jessica Kourkounis

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 4:06 pm

In 2004, 16-year-old Lamont Adams was shot more than a dozen times near his home in North Philadelphia. He was taken to Philadelphia's Temple University Hospital, where trauma unit head Dr. Amy Goldberg fought to save his life. Goldberg lost that battle and Lamont died shortly after arriving at the hospital, but after treating so many gun injuries and watching so many victims die, Goldberg decided to make a change.

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Beauty Shop
11:03 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Who Are The Smartest People On Twitter?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, Sheila Bridges stood out for many reasons in her chosen field of interior design. Her celebrity client list, being African-American, but then she began to stand out in a way she did not want - she started losing her hair. We'll talk about how that changed her life and her focus. She talks about that in her new memoir "The Bald Mermaid." And we'll have that conversation in just a few minutes.

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