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Sports
3:45 am
Thu August 29, 2013

2013 College Football Season Opens On Thursday

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 5:43 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

All right, college football fans, it is time to get out your body paint and those foam fingers. The NCAA Division One football season is starting tonight with 17 games on the schedule. Most of the heavyweights start their campaigns on Saturday, and that includes top-ranked Alabama. NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman joins me to preview the new season. And Tom, are you excited?

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Sure. Are you?

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Around the Nation
3:45 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Firefighters Battle To Get A Grip On Calif. Rim Fire

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 4:15 am

In California, there are more than 4,500 firefighters battling the wildfire burning in and around Yosemite National Park. The Rim Fire is more than 300 square miles in size. Crews have been making progress by doing controlled burns of things like brush that would feed a bigger blaze.

Europe
3:45 am
Thu August 29, 2013

British Prime Minister's Call For Action In Syria Stalls

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 4:25 am

In London, Prime Minister David Cameron had planned to get backing from Parliament Thursday – approving a possible military intervention. Instead, he's been forced to back down. The Labour Party announced it would vote against military action in Syria.

Environment
2:35 am
Thu August 29, 2013

A Cooler Pacific May Be Behind Recent Pause In Global Warming

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 10:47 am

A study in the journal Nature could help explain why the Earth's average temperature hasn't increased during the past 15 years — despite a long-term trend of global warming.

The Earth's average temperature has risen by more than 1 degree Fahrenheit since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. But the temperature rise has not been moving in lock step with the rise of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide — mainly from burning fossil fuels — traps heat in the air.

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Around the Nation
2:34 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Post-Katrina New Orleans A Story Of Modern Pioneering

Ronald Lewis, a resident of the Lower 9th Ward, says eight years after Hurricane Katrina, rebuilding his neighborhood is a story still in progress.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 9:44 am

It's been eight years to the day since Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast. To mark the anniversary, NPR revisits neighborhood activist and curator Ronald Lewis, a New Orleans resident whom Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep regularly checked in with in the months after the storm.

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The Salt
2:33 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Move Over, Pot Stickers: China Cooks Up Hundreds Of Dumplings

A Flock of Dumpling Ducklings: What's inside? Roasted Beijing duck, of course.
Anthony Kuhn NPR

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 6:52 pm

All week, we've been talking about dumplings — from tortellini's sensual origins in Italy to kubbeh's tasty variations in Israel.

But perhaps no country has a longer history or greater variety of dumplings than China. Dumplings come in all shapes and with every imaginable filling. They are served at everything from a humble family meal to elaborate works of culinary art.

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Around the Nation
2:28 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Area Man Realizes He's Been Reading Fake News For 25 Years

Jan. 18-24, 2001
The Onion

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 12:47 pm

Before Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert became establishments in news satire, there was The Onion. Thursday, "America's Finest News Source" turns 25.

Two college students founded the fake news organization, which began as a newspaper in Madison, Wis. "It really started as something very local that was intended mainly to ... sell pizza coupons," Editor-in-Chief Will Tracy tells Morning Edition host Renee Montagne..

It still has that Midwestern touch, he says.

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The NPR 100
5:39 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

The Inspiring Force Of 'We Shall Overcome'

American folk singer and activist Pete Seeger (left) adopted and helped popularize "We Shall Overcome" by teaching the song at rallies and protests. Here he sings with activists in Greenwood, Miss., in 1963.
Adger Cowans Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 8:26 pm

As the nation marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, All Things Considered concludes its series about the moments that defined the historic summer of 1963. Back in 1999, Noah Adams explored the history and legacy of the song "We Shall Overcome" for the NPR 100. The audio link contains a condensed version of that piece.

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Shots - Health News
4:13 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

In South Africa, A Clinic Focuses On Prostitutes To Fight HIV

A prostitute in Johannesburg waits for a client on a street corner. An estimated two-thirds of sex workers in South Africa are HIV positive.
Yoav Lemmer AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 8:25 pm

South Africa has come a long way in dealing with AIDS. The country has been successful in getting drug treatment to millions of people infected with HIV.

But the country still has one of the highest rates of HIV infection in the world — and the virus continues to spread. Nearly 400,000 South Africans are infected with HIV each year.

One health clinic in the heart of Johannesburg is attempting to break the HIV cycle by focusing on people at extremely high risk for infection — prostitutes.

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NPR Story
4:13 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Teen Victoria Duval Pulls Off Major Upset At U.S. Open

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 5:39 pm

American teenager Victoria Duval pulled off a first round upset at the U.S. Open last night when she beat the 2011 tennis champ Samantha Stosur.

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