Pages

The Record
11:03 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

The White Mandingos: Music That Defies Definition

The White Mandingos are, from left, Sacha Jenkins, Murs and Darryl Jenifer.
Courtesy of Biz 3 Publicity

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:59 am

Read more
World Cafe
5:46 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

World Cafe Next: New Country Rehab

Toronto band New Country Rehab.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 1:32 pm

Out of the Toronto music community comes New Country Rehab, an alt-country band that just released its second album, Ghost Of Your Charms.

The foursome, led by singer and fiddle player John Showman, combine a bluegrass aesthetic with some really strong songwriting chops. We love their song "Luxury Hotel," which may make you think differently about your summer vacation spot.

Book Reviews
5:03 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Heading West: The Gritty, Luminous 'Son Of A Gun'

Justin St. Germain teaches at the University of New Mexico.
William Bledsoe

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 7:17 pm

My parents married young — both were still undergraduates — and so by the time my father started graduate school in mathematics, he and my mother were the harried parents of three small children. They wanted us to see America. And so my father chose the University of Arizona — about as far as you could go from our West Virginia home without falling off the country's opposite edge. On our way, we stopped in Tombstone.

Read more
Education
5:03 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Ala. School District Cancels Bus Service, Igniting Controversy

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

I'm Robert Siegel.

For many communities around the country, the yellow school bus is the quintessential sign that school is in session. Well, one school district is taking its buses off the roads. Citing the need to cut costs, district officials in Hoover, Alabama are canceling school bus service starting one year from now.

Read more
Music Reviews
4:06 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Shine And The Moonbeams: R&B For The Kids

Shawana Kemp, lead singer for Shine and the Moonbeams.
Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 7:03 pm

Family music comes in a broad range of styles – folk, rock, punk and even polka. But, compared with its popularity among adults, there have been very few R&B and soul music albums for kids. Enter Shine and the Moonbeams.

Read more
Law
4:06 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

NYPD's 'Stop-And-Frisk' Deemed Unconstitutional

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 5:03 pm

A federal judge in New York City ruled that the police department has been violating the civil rights of tens of thousands of minority New Yorkers with its practice of warrantless searches, better known as "stop-and-frisk." It's a rebuke for city officials have defended the tactic as an important crime-fighting tool. Judge Shira Scheindlin is appointing a federal monitor to oversee reforms at the department.

World
4:06 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Haiti's Cholera Outbreak Tied To Nepalese U.N. Peacekeepers

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 5:03 pm

More than 100 years after the eradication of cholera in the island nation of Haiti, the disease has reemerged with a vengeance. A new study out of Yale University traces the outbreak back to an infected Nepalese disaster response team, dispatched by the UN in the aftermath of Haiti's massive 2010 earthquake. Robert Siegel speaks with the study supervisor, Muneer Ahmad.

Code Switch
3:26 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Medgar Evers' Son Honors Civil Rights Icon In His Own Way

After Medgar Evers was murdered, his wife, Myrlie Evers, carried on his work. This photo shows Myrlie Evers and her children, Van, 9; Darrell, 16; and Rena, 14, in June 1969 in their Claremont, Calif., home.
AP

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 7:06 pm

James Van Dyke Evers was only 3 when his father, Medgar, was assassinated in the driveway of the family's home in Jackson, Miss., in June 1963.

A sniper shot Medgar Evers in the back as he returned from a meeting late at night. Tensions had been running high because Evers, the first field secretary for the NAACP, was making headway in pushing the state's black citizens to register to vote. White Mississippians who had lived comfortably under segregation could feel the ground shifting beneath them — and they didn't like it.

Read more
Shots - Health News
2:33 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Brains Of Dying Rats Yield Clues About Near-Death Experiences

Could the images common in accounts of near-death experiences be explained by a rush of electrical activity in the brain?
Odina iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 6:57 am

A burst of brain activity just after the heart stops may be the cause of so-called near-death experiences, scientists say.

The insight comes from research involving nine lab rats whose brains were analyzed as they were being euthanized. Researchers discovered what appears to be a momentary increase in electrical activity in the brain associated with consciousness.

Although the experiment relied on animals, the results could apply to humans, too, the researchers say.

Read more
Author Interviews
11:50 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Behind 'The New Black': The Real Piper's Prison Story

Taylor Schilling plays Piper in Netflix's Orange Is the New Black, which is based on Piper Kerman's memoir of her year in prison.
Jessica Miglio Netflix

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 10:18 am

Piper Kerman was a 24-year-old Smith College graduate in 1993, when she flew to Belgium with a suitcase of money intended for a West African drug lord.

This misguided adventure started when she began a romantic relationship with a woman who was part of what Kerman describes as a "clique of impossibly stylish and cool lesbians in their mid-30s." That woman was involved in a drug-smuggling ring, and got Kerman involved, too, though Kerman left that life after several months.

Read more

Pages