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Book Reviews
12:41 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

A Gossipy, Nostalgic History Of A Publishing 'Hothouse'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 2:28 pm

In the world of book publishing, ravaged though it may be, the name Farrar, Straus & Giroux still bespeaks literary quality. It's a publishing house that boasts a roll call of 25 Nobel Prize winners and heavyweights like Susan Sontag, Carlos Fuentes, Joan Didion, Philip Roth and Jonathan Franzen. A lot of writers, past and present, have turned down higher advances for their books from other publishing houses for the honor of being an FSG author.

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Music Reviews
12:32 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

A Forgotten Quartet, Reissued And Reevaluated

A new collection of Brahms and Mozart recordings by the Stuyvesant Quartet from 1947 conveys a kind of inward grace.
Jay Shulman Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 12:50 pm

A movie last year called A Late Quartet told the traumatic story of what happens when a famous string quartet has to change personnel. But, in fact, most string quartets — like symphony orchestras, only more conspicuously — continually change players, because players retire, or die, or get more lucrative offers.

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NPR Story
11:02 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Summer Songs: Clarinetist Remakes 50 Cent

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 11:08 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Now we continue our Summer Songs series. Gwen Thompkins, the host of Music Inside Out on WWNO in New Orleans, is introducing us to a handful of contemporary artists who've taken some old classics out for a new spin. This week, she tells us about an unlikely pairing with New Orleans favorite Michael White.

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NPR Story
11:02 am
Thu August 15, 2013

A Family Tree That Includes Slaves — And Slave Owners

Andrea Stuart is also the author of The Rose of Martinique: A Life of Napoleon's Josephine.
Clara Molden Camera Press Redux

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:15 pm

Part of our summer reading series Island Reads, highlighting authors from the Caribbean

Andrea Stuart was curious about her family's history in Barbados. And through years of careful research, she found that her bloodline includes both slave owners and slaves. She has written about her own family, as well as a detailed history of slavery in the Caribbean, in her book Sugar in the Blood. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks with Stuart about her family history, the moral complexity of slavery and finding roots in the past.

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NPR Story
11:02 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Snooty Swiss Saleswoman Equals Racism?

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 11:13 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, we head to Barbados for a twisted family tale that spans centuries. "Sugar in the Blood" is the latest in our summer island read series. More on that in just a few minutes. But first, a visit to the beauty shop. That's where our panel of female commentators and journalists get a fresh cut on the week's news.

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Middle East
10:40 am
Thu August 15, 2013

U.S. Cancels Military Exercise With Egypt Amid Crackdown

President Obama announced the cancellation of a joint military exercise with Egypt in the wake of that country's military government crackdown on protesters. At least 500 were killed in those skirmishes, including 40 police. For more, David Greene speaks with NPR's Scott Horsley.

Around the Nation
5:58 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Word Usage Heats Up Internet, 'Literally'

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. The Internet is literally on fire this morning over the usage of a word. Traditionally literally means something that is strictly true. Google's dictionary, bloggers just noticed, says you can also use that word for emphasis. Like I would literally give my right arm to own a pickup truck. That's true. Grammar sticklers claim Google has sided with language traitors and broken the English language. In other words, the sky is literally falling. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:50 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Ohio University Houses Students At Waterpark Resort

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene.

Capital University, just outside Columbus, Ohio, was gearing up for the new school year when the administration found itself in a slippery situation. There weren't enough dorm rooms on campus. But a local business quickly dove in with a solution: Fort Rapids Resort, an indoor water park. Thirty students will, you might say, tread water there until space frees-up on campus. It's all included in their tuition - yes, including access to the water park itself.

Business
4:24 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Auto Industry's Pent-Up Demand Expected To Ease Slowly

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

If economists looking at the housing sector are generally optimistic, those who follow the auto industry are practically brimming with glee. Right now, the average age of cars on the road is the oldest ever recorded, at 11-and-a-half years, which means at some time, people will have to buy newer ones. As NPR's Sonari Glinton reports, that time may be now.

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Business
4:13 am
Thu August 15, 2013

2 Ex-Traders Accused Of Covering Up JPMorgan Losses

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 4:24 am

Federal prosecutors in the U.S. have charged two former traders in JPMorgan Chase's London office with securities fraud. The two men were part of the so-called "London Whale" case, which ended up costing the company more than $6 billion. U.S. officials say the men lied about the value of some derivatives trades to cover up mounting losses.

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